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OPINION
September 26, 2012
Re "Feeling burned in Sun Village," Column One, Sept. 24 Beginning in 1964, I participated in the Sun Village Waterworks District project. In contrast to the prejudice averred in your article, we in the L.A. County engineer's department worked hard to provide the remote desert enclave with municipal water. I was responsible for engineering Jackie Robinson Park. Ever since junior high, Robinson had been a hero of mine, as when he tore up the gridiron for UCLA. I followed him religiously when he broke Major League Baseball's color line.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
September 26, 2012
Re "Pushing back on test scores," Column, Sept. 22 Though I was glad to see Sandy Banks describe some of the constraints teachers face, I sensed her attitude was that, because there are "reams of research" proving teachers should be on the line for success or failure, teachers should stop whining about the myriad uncontrollable factors determining a student's ability to learn and "talk about something else. " Like what? Class size, inadequate supplies, administrative lethargy or lock-step curriculum requirements?
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 2012 | By Ann M. Simmons, Los Angeles Times
When Virginia Jo Miller first saw the high desert community of Sun Village in 1962, her heart sank. There were no streetlights, no paved roads. Many homes had no electricity. The setting was desolate, "nothing but tumbleweed, jackrabbits and snakes," recalled Miller. The rest of Southern California was booming, with working families similar to hers settling into comfortable subdivisions. But Miller, 68, and her husband, Jerry, were denied that life: They were African American at a time when discriminatory real estate practices throughout Southern California confined black home buyers to certain, often undesirable areas.
OPINION
September 26, 2012
Re "Expanding on soda's role in growing obesity ," Sept. 22 In the 1950s, Pepsi had a radio jingle that said, "Twelve full ounces, that's a lot. " Now fast-food places advertise 44-ounce drinks. The problem isn't what people drink, it is how much they drink. Don Gately Valencia ALSO: Letters: Deporting ex-detainees Letters: Sun Village, then and now Letters: A good example for Congress
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1989 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, Times Staff Writer
The pioneers of Sun Village, a small black community founded 40 years ago in the Antelope Valley, tell of struggle, hope and change. Their stories in some ways evoke the shifting ethnic and racial landscapes of urban America. It has unfolded, however, in a corner of barren desert where Joshua trees claw at the sky.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1992 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The years have not been kind to the desert town of Sun Village, the original black settlement in the Antelope Valley that emerged in the 1940s when blacks weren't allowed to buy property in some mostly white neighborhoods of the region. Never populated by more than a few thousand people, Sun Village is even smaller now. Over the past two decades, the 15-square-mile area has declined as younger blacks have moved away to seek opportunity elsewhere and businesses have disappeared.
OPINION
September 26, 2012
Re "Expanding on soda's role in growing obesity ," Sept. 22 In the 1950s, Pepsi had a radio jingle that said, "Twelve full ounces, that's a lot. " Now fast-food places advertise 44-ounce drinks. The problem isn't what people drink, it is how much they drink. Don Gately Valencia ALSO: Letters: Deporting ex-detainees Letters: Sun Village, then and now Letters: A good example for Congress
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2008 | Ann M. Simmons, Times Staff Writer
The stunning skyline drew Edith Jeske to small-town Acton 35 years ago, the rugged Sierra Pelona to the north and the snow-capped San Gabriel summits to the south. Before her lay the sprawling high desert wilderness dotted with enclaves named for their beauty: Littlerock, Pearblossom, Sun Village, Juniper Hills. "It was rural," said Jeske of the sleepy town of about 9,100 people, 50 miles north of downtown Los Angeles. But today she feels the rustic community, where she lives on 2 1/2 acres, is increasingly being eroded.
OPINION
September 26, 2012
Re "Pushing back on test scores," Column, Sept. 22 Though I was glad to see Sandy Banks describe some of the constraints teachers face, I sensed her attitude was that, because there are "reams of research" proving teachers should be on the line for success or failure, teachers should stop whining about the myriad uncontrollable factors determining a student's ability to learn and "talk about something else. " Like what? Class size, inadequate supplies, administrative lethargy or lock-step curriculum requirements?
OPINION
September 26, 2012
Re "Standout student honored," Sept. 24 Brendan Kutler is the type of person we need in these times. He thought of others, not just himself. His parents must be so proud of him and all he accomplished in his short life; I am proud just reading about him. Our lawmakers should take note of what he did and said. By sharing his class notes on the Internet before tests, he selflessly helped other students. According to his mother, Kutler reasoned that "it wasn't important how he did on the test but how everyone did on it. " We need to help one another, just as Kutler did. We need to stop obstructing bills that would promote the common good only because they don't come from our own party.
OPINION
September 26, 2012
Re "Standout student honored," Sept. 24 Brendan Kutler is the type of person we need in these times. He thought of others, not just himself. His parents must be so proud of him and all he accomplished in his short life; I am proud just reading about him. Our lawmakers should take note of what he did and said. By sharing his class notes on the Internet before tests, he selflessly helped other students. According to his mother, Kutler reasoned that "it wasn't important how he did on the test but how everyone did on it. " We need to help one another, just as Kutler did. We need to stop obstructing bills that would promote the common good only because they don't come from our own party.
OPINION
September 26, 2012
Re "Feeling burned in Sun Village," Column One, Sept. 24 Beginning in 1964, I participated in the Sun Village Waterworks District project. In contrast to the prejudice averred in your article, we in the L.A. County engineer's department worked hard to provide the remote desert enclave with municipal water. I was responsible for engineering Jackie Robinson Park. Ever since junior high, Robinson had been a hero of mine, as when he tore up the gridiron for UCLA. I followed him religiously when he broke Major League Baseball's color line.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 2012 | By Ann M. Simmons, Los Angeles Times
When Virginia Jo Miller first saw the high desert community of Sun Village in 1962, her heart sank. There were no streetlights, no paved roads. Many homes had no electricity. The setting was desolate, "nothing but tumbleweed, jackrabbits and snakes," recalled Miller. The rest of Southern California was booming, with working families similar to hers settling into comfortable subdivisions. But Miller, 68, and her husband, Jerry, were denied that life: They were African American at a time when discriminatory real estate practices throughout Southern California confined black home buyers to certain, often undesirable areas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2008 | Ann M. Simmons, Times Staff Writer
The stunning skyline drew Edith Jeske to small-town Acton 35 years ago, the rugged Sierra Pelona to the north and the snow-capped San Gabriel summits to the south. Before her lay the sprawling high desert wilderness dotted with enclaves named for their beauty: Littlerock, Pearblossom, Sun Village, Juniper Hills. "It was rural," said Jeske of the sleepy town of about 9,100 people, 50 miles north of downtown Los Angeles. But today she feels the rustic community, where she lives on 2 1/2 acres, is increasingly being eroded.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1992 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The years have not been kind to the desert town of Sun Village, the original black settlement in the Antelope Valley that emerged in the 1940s when blacks weren't allowed to buy property in some mostly white neighborhoods of the region. Never populated by more than a few thousand people, Sun Village is even smaller now. Over the past two decades, the 15-square-mile area has declined as younger blacks have moved away to seek opportunity elsewhere and businesses have disappeared.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1989 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, Times Staff Writer
The pioneers of Sun Village, a small black community founded 40 years ago in the Antelope Valley, tell of struggle, hope and change. Their stories in some ways evoke the shifting ethnic and racial landscapes of urban America. It has unfolded, however, in a corner of barren desert where Joshua trees claw at the sky.
SPORTS
August 8, 2013 | By Eric Sondheimer
 Bennie Boatwright, a 6-foot-7 junior who started last season at Mission Hills Alemany, has enrolled at Sun Valley Village Christian, Coach Jon Shaw said. Eric.sondheimer@latimes.com  
SPORTS
January 16, 2014 | By Eric Sondheimer
Florida Montverde Academy, considered the No. 1 high school team in the nation, defeated Sun Valley Village Christian, 96-46, in a tournament game on Thursday in Missouri. Village Christian dropped to 12-2. Eric.sondheimer@latimes.com  
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