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BUSINESS
March 1, 2005 | From Times Staff Reports
The assets of California fruit and vegetable grower Sun World International Inc. have been acquired in a Bankruptcy Court auction by private investment firm Black Diamond Capital Management for $127.8 million. Sun World, based in Coachella and Bakersfield, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in January 2003. The subsidiary of the water company Cadiz Inc. owns about 17,000 acres in the San Joaquin and Coachella valleys, where it grows watermelons, table grapes, citrus and other produce.
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BUSINESS
July 18, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Rancho Cucamonga-based Cadiz Land won court approval of its acquisition of Sun World International, which filed for bankruptcy protection in 1994. . . . Lee Domanico has been appointed chief executive of USC University Hospital. . . . The investment group led by Goldman, Sachs & Co. and David Rockefeller has assumed title to Rockefeller Center, and NBC has completed its purchase of its space there.
BUSINESS
January 31, 2003 | Elizabeth Douglass, Times Staff Writer
Cadiz Inc. said Thursday that its Sun World International agriculture subsidiary filed for bankruptcy protection, adding to the Santa Monica-based water company's list of troubles. Sun World, a fruit and vegetable grower, said it has liabilities of $158 million and assets of $148 million. According to a copy of its Chapter 11 filing in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Riverside, the company has debt of $115 million in notes due in April 2004 and interest payments of $13 million a year.
BUSINESS
March 1, 2005 | From Times Staff Reports
The assets of California fruit and vegetable grower Sun World International Inc. have been acquired in a Bankruptcy Court auction by private investment firm Black Diamond Capital Management for $127.8 million. Sun World, based in Coachella and Bakersfield, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in January 2003. The subsidiary of the water company Cadiz Inc. owns about 17,000 acres in the San Joaquin and Coachella valleys, where it grows watermelons, table grapes, citrus and other produce.
BUSINESS
October 12, 2002 | Michael Hiltzik
AGRICULTURE * Standard & Poor's said it was placing the secured debt for the Cadiz subsidiary Sun World International, an agricultural company, on credit watch with "negative implications." The rating covers $115 million in notes secured by Sun World landholdings and other property. The announcement comes in the wake of the Metropolitan Water District's cancellation of its joint $150-million water storage project with Cadiz Inc.
BUSINESS
January 31, 2003 | Elizabeth Douglass, Times Staff Writer
Cadiz Inc. said Thursday that its Sun World International agriculture subsidiary filed for bankruptcy protection, adding to the Santa Monica-based water company's list of troubles. Sun World, a fruit and vegetable grower, said it has liabilities of $158 million and assets of $148 million. According to a copy of its Chapter 11 filing in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Riverside, the company has debt of $115 million in notes due in April 2004 and interest payments of $13 million a year.
BUSINESS
October 5, 1994 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sun World, the California produce giant that brought consumers the seedless watermelon, has filed for protection from its creditors under Chapter 11 of the U.S. bankruptcy code, the company said Tuesday. The Bakersfield-based firm--known around the world for its patented fruits and vegetables--filed the petition late Monday in federal court in San Bernardino. Its parent company, Sun World International, also filed for bankruptcy protection. The privately owned company is the largest U.S.
FOOD
August 2, 1990 | DANIEL P. PUZO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No fruit or vegetable has been more maligned than the modern tomato. And with good reason. The wonderful varieties that were sold in farmers' markets and roadside stands are, for the most part, gone from today's grocery store. The rich flavor, deep color and juicy texture of the classic beefsteak are distant memories. But now a major breakthrough in tomato technology is occurring in Orange County.
BUSINESS
January 18, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Tomato Virus Could Threaten Crops Globally: Much of Orange County has already been affected by a tomato virus, carried by a fly the size of a pinhead, that threatens the world's crop, agriculture officials warn. Growers may have to abandon Orange County's tomato industry, which had $17.4 million in 1992 sales, in order to halt the spread of the disease carried by the greenhouse whitefly, said James Duffus, a U.S. Department of Agriculture researcher.
BUSINESS
October 12, 2002 | Michael Hiltzik
AGRICULTURE * Standard & Poor's said it was placing the secured debt for the Cadiz subsidiary Sun World International, an agricultural company, on credit watch with "negative implications." The rating covers $115 million in notes secured by Sun World landholdings and other property. The announcement comes in the wake of the Metropolitan Water District's cancellation of its joint $150-million water storage project with Cadiz Inc.
BUSINESS
July 18, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Rancho Cucamonga-based Cadiz Land won court approval of its acquisition of Sun World International, which filed for bankruptcy protection in 1994. . . . Lee Domanico has been appointed chief executive of USC University Hospital. . . . The investment group led by Goldman, Sachs & Co. and David Rockefeller has assumed title to Rockefeller Center, and NBC has completed its purchase of its space there.
BUSINESS
October 5, 1994 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sun World, the California produce giant that brought consumers the seedless watermelon, has filed for protection from its creditors under Chapter 11 of the U.S. bankruptcy code, the company said Tuesday. The Bakersfield-based firm--known around the world for its patented fruits and vegetables--filed the petition late Monday in federal court in San Bernardino. Its parent company, Sun World International, also filed for bankruptcy protection. The privately owned company is the largest U.S.
FOOD
August 2, 1990 | DANIEL P. PUZO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No fruit or vegetable has been more maligned than the modern tomato. And with good reason. The wonderful varieties that were sold in farmers' markets and roadside stands are, for the most part, gone from today's grocery store. The rich flavor, deep color and juicy texture of the classic beefsteak are distant memories. But now a major breakthrough in tomato technology is occurring in Orange County.
BUSINESS
January 17, 2002 | Bloomberg News
Cadiz Inc. agreed to combine its Sun World International water and farming business with an Egyptian agricultural company controlled by billionaire Saudi Prince Al Waleed ibn Talal ibn Abdulaziz al Saud. Santa Monica-based Cadiz will own 50.25% of the combined company. Kingdom Agricultural Development Co., a private agricultural company founded by Al Waleed, will control 49.75%, said Cadiz spokeswoman Cynthia Coulter. Terms were not disclosed.
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