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July 10, 1989 | MILES CORWIN, Times Staff Writer
Norman Paulsen has shown a remarkable ability during his 20-year career as a guru to preach asceticism and live in comfort. While most of his followers live in Utah and work long hours for low pay in one of the commune's small businesses, Paulsen lives in a waterfront Oxnard condominium a short walk from the group's 78-foot schooner, where he can sail every day and ponder cosmic issues without distraction.
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NEWS
July 10, 1989 | MILES CORWIN, Times Staff Writer
Norman Paulsen has shown a remarkable ability during his 20-year career as a guru to preach asceticism and live in comfort. While most of his followers live in Utah and work long hours for low pay in one of the commune's small businesses, Paulsen lives in a waterfront Oxnard condominium a short walk from the group's 78-foot schooner, where he can sail every day and ponder cosmic issues without distraction.
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BUSINESS
May 29, 1998 | Bloomberg News
Dole Food Co. bought two fresh-flower companies in an effort to offer more products to supermarkets that already buy Dole's fruit, vegetables and salads. Westlake Village-based Dole, the world's largest producer and marketer of fresh fruit and vegetables, said it acquired closely held Sunburst Farms Inc., the largest U.S. importer of fresh-cut flowers, and closely held Floramerica Co., Latin America's largest grower and exporter of cut flowers to the U.S.
BUSINESS
June 9, 1998 | BARBARA MURPHY
Dole Food Co. in Westlake Village has purchased two fresh-flower companies in an effort to offer more products to supermarkets that already buy Dole's fruit, vegetables and salads. Dole, the world's largest producer and marketer of fresh fruit and vegetables, said it acquired Sunburst Farms, the largest U.S. importer of fresh-cut flowers, and Floramerica Co., Latin America's largest grower and exporter of fresh-cut flowers to the United States.
BUSINESS
September 9, 1986 | JAMES BATES, Times Staff Writer
Arose by any other name would smell as sweet except at a firm like Aldik. There, the roses don't smell at all. Neither do the chrysanthemums, fuchsias, azaleas or hundreds of other flowers and plants that the Van Nuys company sells. They're all artificial. All the same, Aldik's business is blossoming, with annual sales up about fourfold in five years, to $12 million now.
BUSINESS
June 15, 1986 | BRUCE KEPPEL, Times Staff Writer
For a while, Carpinteria flower grower Henry Persoon seriously considered moving his H&M Flowers operation to Bolivia in order to compete better in the U.S. cut-flower market. "When I call up a customer and say that I've got so many bunches of flowers and ask if he'd like to take some at such and such a price," Persoon said, "he'll tell me he can get them out of South America for half that. So I was thinking of giving up here and going to Bolivia and starting over."
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