Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSundance Kid
IN THE NEWS

Sundance Kid

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 3, 1992 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Butch and Sundance. Now there's a neat little mystery. Were the famed outlaws really killed in Bolivia after a shootout with troops? Did Butch Cassidy kill the Sundance Kid, then do himself in, rather than be captured? Or did they escape and live out their lives, as lore has it, in such disparate locales as France, Uruguay and Spokane, Wash.?
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2011 | By Mark Olsen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Sam Shepard's cultural reach goes deep. There's the Oscar nomination for supporting actor in "The Right Stuff," the Pulitzer Prize for his play "Buried Child" and his screenplay for the seminal film "Paris, Texas. " Shepard makes a brief appearance in Patti Smith's recent memoir, "Just Kids," in which she describes him as "my cowboy with Indian ways. " And with his soulful, loner swagger, he represents the poetic masculine American ideal. The new film "Blackthorn," which is already available on video on demand and which opened in Los Angeles on Friday, presupposes that the Wild West bandit Butch Cassidy did not die in a sepia-toned shootout as famously depicted in 1969's "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. " Rather, Shepard, in an increasingly rare lead role, portrays the outlaw as an old man living in the hardscrabble mountains of Bolivia, feeling time passing him by and dreaming of returning to America.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1989
In the article "Pinkerton's Nuggets" (Metro, Feb. 20), staff writer Amy Pyle incorrectly identified the National Archives as the repository of some of the original Pinkerton National Detective Agency material. This collection, approximately 2,000 items, is in the possession of the Library of Congress. The National Archives, which is the repository of permanently valuable documents created by the federal government, does not have any Pinkerton material in its holdings, with the exception of the wanted poster for Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid!
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2011 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
In the opening scenes of "Blackthorn," the old desperado who gives this mostly satisfying western its name is bent over a letter, writing of coming back home to the U.S. Though he's grown gray, he remains split-rail hard, suffers no fools — he's still plenty fiery too, if the girl in his bed is any indication. Naturally, the character is played by Sam Shepard, who wears the dust, the boots, the bravado and the rest as if they were designed for him alone. And so begins Spanish filmmaker Mateo Gil's lightly rendered reimagining of the later days of Butch Cassidy, which expands on the rumors that the legendary outlaw and his cohort the Sundance Kid did not die in a 1908 shootout in Bolivia.
NEWS
February 16, 2010 | By Lauren Beale
A Malibu beach home once owned by actor-producer-director Robert Redford has come on the market for $13.8 million. The gated two-story, built in 1948 and extensively upgraded, has walls of glass, living areas that open to expansive patios, and stone and hardwood floors. There are five bedrooms, 4 1/2 bathrooms and two fireplaces in 5,329 square feet. The ocean view master bedroom features an attached spa. Redford, 73, received the first Robert Redford Award for Engaged Artists award from the USC School of Theatre earlier this month for his social activism.
TRAVEL
April 20, 2008 | By Susan Spano, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
"Most of what follows is true. " That's the opening of "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid," the 1969 movie about two bandits born as the sun was setting over the mesas and buttes of the old Wild West. Morally ambiguous, the movie struck a chord with Vietnam War-era audiences who stood and cheered when Paul Newman as Butch and Robert Redford as Sundance met a hail of bullets in a dusty Bolivian town, etching the final freeze frame onto my 15-year-old heart. I didn't know it then, but the movie wrote something else there: a love of the sumptuous Western scenery, which I rediscovered on a trip last month to southern Utah.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 1986 | RODERICK MANN
If you wondered what happened to Diane Lane after she made "The Cotton Club" a couple of years ago--wonder no more. She's finally surfaced again, this time in Pittsburgh, and she's gone back to work. Lane, who made a Time cover at 14 after working with Laurence Olivier in "A Little Romance" and who earned some of the best notices in "The Cotton Club" in which she played a sophisticated '20s vamp, decided she'd made enough money in her 15-year career to take things easy for awhile.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2011 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
In the opening scenes of "Blackthorn," the old desperado who gives this mostly satisfying western its name is bent over a letter, writing of coming back home to the U.S. Though he's grown gray, he remains split-rail hard, suffers no fools — he's still plenty fiery too, if the girl in his bed is any indication. Naturally, the character is played by Sam Shepard, who wears the dust, the boots, the bravado and the rest as if they were designed for him alone. And so begins Spanish filmmaker Mateo Gil's lightly rendered reimagining of the later days of Butch Cassidy, which expands on the rumors that the legendary outlaw and his cohort the Sundance Kid did not die in a 1908 shootout in Bolivia.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2011 | By Mark Olsen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Sam Shepard's cultural reach goes deep. There's the Oscar nomination for supporting actor in "The Right Stuff," the Pulitzer Prize for his play "Buried Child" and his screenplay for the seminal film "Paris, Texas. " Shepard makes a brief appearance in Patti Smith's recent memoir, "Just Kids," in which she describes him as "my cowboy with Indian ways. " And with his soulful, loner swagger, he represents the poetic masculine American ideal. The new film "Blackthorn," which is already available on video on demand and which opened in Los Angeles on Friday, presupposes that the Wild West bandit Butch Cassidy did not die in a sepia-toned shootout as famously depicted in 1969's "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. " Rather, Shepard, in an increasingly rare lead role, portrays the outlaw as an old man living in the hardscrabble mountains of Bolivia, feeling time passing him by and dreaming of returning to America.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1994 | Ty Tagami
Sean Nelson had just turned 13 when he took on the role of Fresh, the street-smart, drug-running teen in the current movie of the same name. But besides living in New York City and liking "X-Men" comics, Nelson and the character he plays have little in common. Nelson lives with his parents, six siblings and a menagerie of birds, rabbits and fish in an apartment in the Bronx. Now 14, he has just started ninth grade at Manhattan's Professional Performing Arts School.
NEWS
February 16, 2010 | By Lauren Beale
A Malibu beach home once owned by actor-producer-director Robert Redford has come on the market for $13.8 million. The gated two-story, built in 1948 and extensively upgraded, has walls of glass, living areas that open to expansive patios, and stone and hardwood floors. There are five bedrooms, 4 1/2 bathrooms and two fireplaces in 5,329 square feet. The ocean view master bedroom features an attached spa. Redford, 73, received the first Robert Redford Award for Engaged Artists award from the USC School of Theatre earlier this month for his social activism.
TRAVEL
April 20, 2008 | By Susan Spano, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
"Most of what follows is true. " That's the opening of "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid," the 1969 movie about two bandits born as the sun was setting over the mesas and buttes of the old Wild West. Morally ambiguous, the movie struck a chord with Vietnam War-era audiences who stood and cheered when Paul Newman as Butch and Robert Redford as Sundance met a hail of bullets in a dusty Bolivian town, etching the final freeze frame onto my 15-year-old heart. I didn't know it then, but the movie wrote something else there: a love of the sumptuous Western scenery, which I rediscovered on a trip last month to southern Utah.
BOOKS
July 9, 2006 | Phillip Lopate, Essayist and novelist Phillip Lopate is the editor of "American Movie Critics: From the Silents Until Now."
EVER since the French New Wave and the auteur theory arrived simultaneously on our shores in the early 1960s, there have been attempts to promote, as equivalent wavelets, succeeding generations of gifted American directors. The 1970s emergence of Martin Scorsese, Francis Ford Coppola, Bob Rafelson, William Friedkin, Michael Cimino and Hal Ashby is often celebrated as the golden age of the maverick filmmaker, able to make exciting, personal works within the studio system.
SPORTS
January 25, 1997 | From Associated Press
Tonya Harding might try an Olympic comeback to the strains of some other country's national anthem, and the question is: Where can she get those golden skates sharpened in Bolivia? Harding's agent said Friday he was near a decision on asking the U.S. Figure Skating Assn. to rescind the lifetime ban imposed for the two-time Olympian's part in covering up the attack on rival Nancy Kerrigan three years ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1996 | BOB MIMS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid met their maker in a dusty Bolivian town on Nov. 6, 1908. Historians say they are dead. What refuses to die is the legend that they survived that shootout and lived on. Now comes a batch of new research that tends to lay the legend in its grave. But don't bank on it.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1994 | Ty Tagami
Sean Nelson had just turned 13 when he took on the role of Fresh, the street-smart, drug-running teen in the current movie of the same name. But besides living in New York City and liking "X-Men" comics, Nelson and the character he plays have little in common. Nelson lives with his parents, six siblings and a menagerie of birds, rabbits and fish in an apartment in the Bronx. Now 14, he has just started ninth grade at Manhattan's Professional Performing Arts School.
NEWS
June 11, 1995 | Peter Rainer
Paul Newman and Robert Redford (from left) star in this mega-popular 1969 Western, and a lot of people have fond memories of it still. As outlaws perpetually on the run from an entire fleet of posses and lawmen, the two glamor boys get to go buddy-buddy big time. They have an easy rapport that sets the stage for their subsequent pairing in "The Sting." True Western fans tend to dislike this film--deriding it, with some justice, as nothing but a "Beverly Hills Western."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|