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August 19, 2009 | Pete Thomas
A month after Zac Sunderland, at 17, became the youngest person to sail around the world by himself, his younger sister has announced plans to try to break that record. Abby Sunderland, who will turn 16 in October, is hoping to embark on a nonstop, unassisted voyage in November aboard a 40-foot cruising vessel, and complete the trip in about six months. First, however, she will have to land a sponsor to help cover the $350,000 cost of the odyssey. "I've been wanting to do this since I was 13, and when I was 13 there was nobody doing this," she told the Associated Press.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2011 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
Abby Sunderland is sitting barefoot aboard her brother's boat in Marina del Rey on a recent morning, her blond hair fluttering in the light breeze. The only physical evidence of the five months she traveled by herself at sea before her sailboat rolled over, ripping off her mast and soaking everything on board, is a simple rope bracelet. The knotted white band on her left wrist was a gift from one of the French fishermen who found her last summer, officially ending her attempt to become the world's youngest sailor to circumnavigate the globe nonstop.
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SPORTS
July 8, 2003 | Tim Brown
The Lakers announced Monday that Paul Sunderland has signed a contract to announce Laker games for two more years. He will work on television alongside analyst Stu Lantz, who also recently agreed to a two-year deal. Sunderland replaced Chick Hearn for 56 games during the 2001-02 season, then all of last season. Hearn died nearly a year ago. "I'm absolutely thrilled the Lakers would want me back for an extended period of time," Sunderland said Monday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 2010 | By Catherine Saillant, Los Angeles Times
Rescued teen sailor Abby Sunderland has hired a talent agent and will use her public profile to "inspire others to follow their dreams," her spokesman said. Sunderland, 16, signed Lyall Mercer, head of an Australian-based public relations and talent management firm, to handle her business affairs. Mercer had been serving in a pro bono capacity as Sunderland's spokesman during the last few weeks. Public fascination over Sunderland's aborted attempt to sail around the world by herself has raised her profile significantly, Mercer said in a statement released this week.
SPORTS
April 1, 2005 | LARRY STEWART
The Lakers need to make some changes. But changing television play-by-play announcers shouldn't be one of them. What the Lakers need are more wins, not more one-liners. Paul Sunderland is no Chick Hearn. But who is? Sunderland was put in a difficult position when he was asked to fill in for Hearn for 56 games during the 2001-02 season, and again when he was asked to replace Hearn after his death in August 2002. Following a legend isn't easy.
SPORTS
March 30, 2002
As we Laker fans eagerly await Chick Hearn's return, I would like to express my personal "slaaaaam dunk" to Paul Sunderland, for the exceptional job he has done keeping Chick's seat warm, giving us his excellent "words-eye view" of the Lakers' games during Chick's absence. While filling in for, arguably, the finest basketball play-by-play announcer to ever sit behind a mike, Paul has maintained the consistent high quality and objectivity that we have enjoyed over the years with Chick.
SPORTS
May 3, 2005 | Larry Stewart, Times Staff Writer
Paul Sunderland was informed Monday that the Lakers will not bring him back as their television play-by-play announcer. He got the word from Laker executive vice president Frank Mariani, who handles the team's broadcasting deals. Mariani did not say what the team's plans were regarding a new TV play-by-play announcer. But he did say he expected to re-sign commentator Stu Lantz, who has had that role for 18 seasons.
SPORTS
January 19, 1992 | MIKE PENNER
All around him, bodies were falling. All around him, jump shots were not. Aaron Sunderland looked all around the Bren Center, sizing up Saturday night's first half between the winless wonders of the Big West Conference, and would have pinched his nose closed if he hadn't been busy trying to dribble basketballs through a minefield of writhing Titans and Anteaters. " Oooooeeeeee! " Sunderland squealed. "That was bad.
SPORTS
September 27, 2002 | LARRY STEWART
Paul Sunderland knew an offer was forthcoming from the Lakers because his agent had called the night before. So what did Sunderland do? He went fishing. Sunderland is not an avid fisherman, but he and longtime KLAC engineer/producer Frank Polak had planned the outing for some time. Polak works Laker radio broadcasts from the KLAC studios in Los Angeles, so he was only a voice Sunderland heard in his earpiece when he announced 56 Laker games last season.
SPORTS
March 5, 1993 | SCOTT MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cal State Fullerton, shooting only 38.8% from the field, lost its third game in a row, 78-70, Thursday night as New Mexico State clinched the No. 1 seeding in the Big West Conference tournament in front of 2,279 in Titan Gym. The Titans, and especially point guard Aaron Sunderland, were off-target from almost every location. Sunderland, calling it his worst game at any level, was 0 for 15 from the field.
OPINION
June 30, 2010 | Sean Dolan
Now that Abby Sunderland is safe and sound and the major part of the hullabaloo about her distress and rescue has died down, I would like to weigh in with some thoughts from the perspective of 36 years at sea, with 18 of them spent as captain and chief mate of a number of container ships. I am not going to speak to the question of Mr. and Mrs. Sunderland's parental wisdom — or lack thereof — in encouraging, allowing, and facilitating Abby's ill-conceived voyage. I'll leave that to the psychologists and social workers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 2010 | By Catherine Saillant, Los Angeles Times
Facing dozens of cameras, 16-year-old sailor Abby Sunderland thanked her rescuers on Tuesday, recounted how she got through her most terrifying moments at sea and spoke about how her family has gotten through sharp criticism of the voyage. Responding to those who said she was too young to sail around the world by herself, Abby defended her abilities. On boats since she was a toddler, she has worked as a crew member on sailboats piloted by her father, a shipwright, and her older brother, Zac, who made his own circumnavigation last year at age 17, before departing on her trip in late January.
OPINION
June 29, 2010 | Karin Klein
A brave teenager came to mind the other day. She is a 15-year-old girl who had served time for drugs and robbery, and had decided to shed her past and do well in school. But the streets were a constant danger. She told me, in her gentle voice, how afraid she was to leave Locke High School every day because of the gangs that prowled off campus. Her family had worked out a plan for her: Go to a relative's house nearby until her brother could pick her up and take her home. Paradoxically, I thought of this girl, and other teenagers I met during a year of covering Locke, because of Abby Sunderland, the bold 16-year-old who plied the ocean, got herself into a sea of trouble and then was rescued as the world watched and fretted.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 2010 | By My-Thuan Tran, Los Angeles Times
Abby Sunderland, the teenage sailor who was rescued after her yacht became disabled by strong waves in the Indian Ocean while attempting a solo around-the-world voyage, was one step closer to home Friday night when she landed at Reunion Island, near Madagascar. Several people were waiting for her on the island: her older brother, Zac, who sailed around the world alone at age 17 in 2009, and some members of her support team, according to her blog. After she arrived about 10 p.m. Pacific time, Sunderland told reporters that she was "really disappointed that things didn't go as planned," the Associated Press reported.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 2010 | By Catherine Saillant, Rich Connell and Scott Collins, Los Angeles Times
Even as rescued teenage sailor Abby Sunderland makes her way back home to California, a battle is shaping up over who will tell the story of her harrowing sea voyage — and what the story line will be. The possibility of dueling narratives emerged this week as a Los Angeles production team and Abby's parents squabbled over the back story of her attempted around-the-world journey. It remains unclear whether any type of film or reality TV show will emerge from Abby's aborted trip.
OPINION
June 17, 2010 | Meghan Daum
What is the "appropriate" age to watch an R-rated movie, take public transportation alone, get your ears pierced, get your nose pierced? The general consensus would probably be that it's all relative. Society imposes legal age restrictions on certain privileges, but most people agree that it depends on the individual. Anyone who's spent five minutes in a high school hallway knows that some 16-year-olds seem more like third-graders while others act as if they could be working in a Las Vegas casino.
SPORTS
March 30, 2005 | Larry Stewart
Laker television announcer Paul Sunderland learned Tuesday that the team might not renew his contract, which expires at the end of the season. Frank Mariani, Laker executive vice president in charge of broadcasting, said Sunderland's contract has a stipulation that he be notified by April 1 if the Lakers do not plan to re-sign him. "We want to keep our options open," Mariani said, "and we were contractually bound to let Paul know that."
SPORTS
March 24, 2006 | LARRY STEWART
Paul Sunderland got the devastating news a year ago Sunday. His agent at the time called, telling him that the Lakers were not going to renew his contract. A few days later, Sunderland got a letter from Frank Mariani, Laker executive vice president, that strongly implied that Sunderland was out as the Lakers' television play-by-play announcer. "It was obviously a tremendous disappointment," Sunderland said this week. "But what's done is done. There is no going back.
OPINION
June 16, 2010 | Bruce Barcott
What in heaven's name were her parents thinking? For a lot of people, that was the second thought that came to mind upon hearing that Abby Sunderland, the 16-year-old Thousand Oaks girl attempting to sail solo around the world, was rescued by a French fishing vessel Saturday after being cast adrift in the middle of the Indian Ocean. (The first thought, of course, was: Thank God she's alive.) Now that Abby's OK, the inevitable storm of criticism is raining down on her parents, Laurence and Marianne, who wished their daughter bon voyage when she cast off from Marina del Rey in January.
OPINION
June 15, 2010
Making waves Re "Sailor's parents unswayed by critics," June 12 As a solo sailor with thousands of miles under the keel, and as a father of five, I can't tell you how incensed I am at Abby Sunderland's teenage prank. First, who says sailing when you are talking to daddy on the satellite phone every few hours is "solo" sailing? Second, who says a child adrift in a dismasted vessel in the Indian Ocean is "safe"? Finally, isn't child endangerment a crime in California?
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