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Sundial Bridge

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TRAVEL
June 27, 2004 | Catharine Hamm, Times Staff Writer
You can see the work of architect Santiago Calatrava at the Olympics this summer in Athens; in the revitalization of parts of Valencia, Spain; and in the new PATH transportation terminal at the World Trade Center site in New York. And now, add Redding to his list of sites. Calatrava's $23-million Sundial Bridge, which spans the Sacramento River and links the campuses of Turtle Bay Exploration Park, is scheduled to open July 4.
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TRAVEL
October 10, 2010 | By Christopher Reynolds, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
They're a disparate lot ? museums, hotels, an observation deck, a sculpture park and a sundial-shaped bridge ? but these recent structures, none more than 10 years old, are redefining the West. Before we bow to them, though, let's admit that it's been a good decade too for landmark renewal, including San Francisco's Ferry Building (www.ferrybuildingmarketplace.com), a transit hub reborn in 2003 as a foodie mall; Sausalito's Cavallo Point, an Army post born again in 2008 as a luxury lodge (www.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 2004 | Rone Tempest, Times Staff Writer
A few days ago, he was in the Netherlands, surrounded by Dutch royalty and assorted European culturati, for the gala dedication of three new spans he designed. But it was nothing, Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava said, compared to the stirring Fourth of July bridge opening here Sunday. Local boosters are hoping the soaring new $23.
TRAVEL
June 3, 2007 | Beverly Beyette, Times Staff Writer
SEEN through the semi-translucent green glass deck of the Sundial Bridge at Turtle Bay, the Sacramento River is a sun-dappled abstract watercolor. It is a beautiful thing, this bridge, a sculpture in steel, glass and granite. One can walk it again and again and each time make a new discovery, finding a different angle from which to view its soaring white pylon. At night, when the bridge is illuminated from underneath, it glows.
TRAVEL
June 3, 2007 | Beverly Beyette, Times Staff Writer
SEEN through the semi-translucent green glass deck of the Sundial Bridge at Turtle Bay, the Sacramento River is a sun-dappled abstract watercolor. It is a beautiful thing, this bridge, a sculpture in steel, glass and granite. One can walk it again and again and each time make a new discovery, finding a different angle from which to view its soaring white pylon. At night, when the bridge is illuminated from underneath, it glows.
TRAVEL
October 10, 2010 | By Christopher Reynolds, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
They're a disparate lot ? museums, hotels, an observation deck, a sculpture park and a sundial-shaped bridge ? but these recent structures, none more than 10 years old, are redefining the West. Before we bow to them, though, let's admit that it's been a good decade too for landmark renewal, including San Francisco's Ferry Building (www.ferrybuildingmarketplace.com), a transit hub reborn in 2003 as a foodie mall; Sausalito's Cavallo Point, an Army post born again in 2008 as a luxury lodge (www.
BUSINESS
May 10, 2009 | Times Staff And Wire Reports
Eric Peterson says California "just might be the greatest state for road trips." And he's written a new book to prove his point: "Ramble California: A Wanderer's Guide to the Offbeat, Overlooked, and Outrageous." The book includes sections on Los Angeles and Southern California, on San Francisco and Northern California, on Central California's coastal areas and valley, on the High Sierra, and on places in the California desert such as Joshua Tree National Park, Death Valley and Palm Springs.
NEWS
July 21, 2002 | DON THOMPSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER
Visitors to the city's new Turtle Bay Museum blink as they leave the summer's hot glare and enter a cool limestone cave that mimics popular nearby Lake Shasta Caverns right down to the fake bats and cave crickets. They emerge face-to-face with a 22,000-gallon open-air aquarium teeming with steelhead and sturgeon, giving the illusion that they have waded head-deep into the Sacramento River 100 feet away.
OPINION
April 25, 2010 | By Lewis MacAdams and Alex Ward
In Life magazine photographer Horace Bristol's 1933 photo, the 6th Street Bridge's graceful, steel, streamline Moderne arches gleam in the sunlight, the perfect symbol of a young metropolis just coming into its own. When it opened in 1932, according to Joe Linton's "Down By the Los Angeles River: Friends of the Los Angeles River's Official Guide," the nearly mile-long link was the longest concrete bridge in the world. It was also the last great downtown Los Angeles River bridge — formally known as a viaduct because it spans not just a river but railroad tracks and roads — and the crowning achievement of the city's engineer for bridges and structures, Merrill Butler, who, over four decades of service, oversaw the construction of at least nine Los Angeles River bridges.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 2011 | By Gale Holland, Los Angeles Times
Heather Dennis first saw him rolling up to the Dutch Bros. Coffee house, his music shrieking out the car window. Dutch Bros. was where everybody young in Redding, at the northern tip of California's Central Valley, hung out. Heather, just 18, was sitting in her truck with her friends listening to her own music. "I yelled at him, 'If I wanted to hear your music, I'd just come over and sit in your car,' " she said. After that encounter in July 2008, they were together every evening until Preston J. Dennis joined the Army and started basic training later that year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 2004 | Rone Tempest, Times Staff Writer
A few days ago, he was in the Netherlands, surrounded by Dutch royalty and assorted European culturati, for the gala dedication of three new spans he designed. But it was nothing, Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava said, compared to the stirring Fourth of July bridge opening here Sunday. Local boosters are hoping the soaring new $23.
TRAVEL
June 27, 2004 | Catharine Hamm, Times Staff Writer
You can see the work of architect Santiago Calatrava at the Olympics this summer in Athens; in the revitalization of parts of Valencia, Spain; and in the new PATH transportation terminal at the World Trade Center site in New York. And now, add Redding to his list of sites. Calatrava's $23-million Sundial Bridge, which spans the Sacramento River and links the campuses of Turtle Bay Exploration Park, is scheduled to open July 4.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 2001 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The footbridge rising on the banks of the Sacramento River is not the rustic span one might expect in this former timber town. It is a soaring configuration of steel and glass that has stirred up questions of civic identity, power and money. The creation of one of the world's most innovative bridge builders, the structure will cost nearly $20 million and look unlike anything else in a part of the state known more for high temperatures than high design.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 2005 | Ann M. Simmons, Times Staff Writer
For generations, the people of Shasta County made their livings by taking from the land, logging and mining. Today they are trying to exploit nature in a different way -- through preserving and sharing its beauty.
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