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BUSINESS
January 26, 1993 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a consolidation of the commercial avionics manufacturing business, Rockwell International Corp. said Monday that it has acquired a division of Sundstrand Corp. for $225 million. Rockwell said it will merge Sundstrand's Data Control subsidiary in Redmond, Wash., into its Collins Commercial Avionics after the sale closes. The Sundstrand unit makes avionics equipment, including "black boxes" that record data in aircraft cockpits.
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BUSINESS
September 22, 2011 | Bloomberg News
United Technologies Corp. agreed Thursday to buy Goodrich Corp. for $16.5 billion, adding a maker of aircraft landing gear and jet-turbine casings to take advantage of a record surge in commercial plane orders. The acquisition caps a years-long pursuit by United Technologies, whose aviation brands include Pratt & Whitney jet engines and Sikorsky helicopters. Chief Executive Louis Chenevert plans to fold his Hamilton Sundstrand aviation equipment and Goodrich into UTC Aerospace Systems, based in Goodrich's hometown of Charlotte, N.C. Goodrich stockholders will get $127.50 a share as Hartford, Conn.-based United Technologies finances about 25% of the purchase with equity and the rest with new debt.
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BUSINESS
April 13, 1993 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Plans by Rockwell International Corp. to bolster its civilian aviation controls division with the acquisition of Sundstrand Corp.'s $200-million avionics unit were dashed Monday as the two companies failed to reach final agreement on the deal. Neither side would say whether the hang-up involved disagreement over numbers, such as Sundstrand Data Control's market value, or other factors like government approval of the merger or Rockwell's plans for the Sundstrand division's 1,500 employees.
BUSINESS
February 23, 1999 | Reuters
In the biggest deal in its 70-year history, United Technologies Corp., a leading maker of jet engines and aerospace components, said it has agreed to acquire aerospace components supplier Sundstrand Corp. for about $4.3 billion. Hartford, Conn.-based United Technologies said it would pay for the purchase 50% in cash and 50% in stock. It said the deal values Sundstrand at $70 a share, $11.50 above the stock's closing price on the New York Stock Exchange on Friday. Rockford, Ill.
BUSINESS
October 6, 1990 | Associated Press
Aerospace contractor Sundstrand Corp. and industrial equipment maker Milton Roy Co. have announced the signing of a merger agreement expected to be implemented about year-end. Milton Roy sees the merger as a way to broaden its distribution base.
BUSINESS
June 27, 1991
Sundstrand Corp. is moving its aviation parts manufacturing subsidiary with 110 employees to Redmond, Wash., as part of a consolidation, a company spokesman said Wednesday. Global Wulfsberg Systems Co., which makes navigation and communication equipment for small aircraft, will move sometime between July and September, said Claude Vernam, a Sundstrand spokesman. "We had two similar businesses in two places and we chose to consolidate in Redmond, where the operation was bigger," Vernam said.
BUSINESS
January 6, 1989 | Associated Press
Sundstrand Corp. said Thursday that it had fired five executives and disciplined 12 others for their roles in a Pentagon fraud scandal that has cost the suspended defense contractor more than $127 million. The Rockford, Ill.
BUSINESS
August 4, 1992 | DEAN TAKAHASHI
Sundstrand Corp. will shut down an aerospace parts manufacturing plant here over the next 14 months and lay off as many as 225 employees in a consolidation, the company confirmed Monday. The company will shift the plant's operations of building commercial and military electrical power systems to a newly acquired, half-empty plant in Ohio, said Gary Hedges, spokesman for Rockford, Ill.-based Sundstrand.
BUSINESS
July 12, 1990 | United Press International
Sundstrand Corp. has amassed a 15% stake in Milton Roy Co. for investment purposes, it said in a Securities and Exchange Commission filing. Sundstrand paid $15.6 million for 796,000 shares of the St. Petersburg, Fla., company.
BUSINESS
September 29, 1994 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For clues about how Harry C. Stonecipher is going to run McDonnell Douglas Corp., the best place to start is the seven years he spent in Rockford, Ill., running a large but bland aerospace company known as Sundstrand Corp. Stonecipher arrived as Sundstrand's president in 1987, just as the maker of aircraft and industrial parts was in trouble with the Pentagon for price fraud.
BUSINESS
April 13, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sundstrand Deal with Rockwell Terminated: Sundstrand Corp. said a deal to sell its civilian product lines to Rockwell International Corp. has fallen through. Rockwell, based in Seal Beach, had agreed several months ago to pay $225 million for Sundstrand Data Control, which has 1,500 employees and annual sales of $200 million.
BUSINESS
April 13, 1993 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Plans by Rockwell International Corp. to bolster its civilian aviation controls division with the acquisition of Sundstrand Corp.'s $200-million avionics unit were dashed Monday as the two companies failed to reach final agreement on the deal. Neither side would say whether the hang-up involved disagreement over numbers, such as Sundstrand Data Control's market value, or other factors like government approval of the merger or Rockwell's plans for the Sundstrand division's 1,500 employees.
BUSINESS
January 26, 1993 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a consolidation of the commercial avionics manufacturing business, Rockwell International Corp. said Monday that it has acquired a division of Sundstrand Corp. for $225 million. Rockwell said it will merge Sundstrand's Data Control subsidiary in Redmond, Wash., into its Collins Commercial Avionics after the sale closes. The Sundstrand unit makes avionics equipment, including "black boxes" that record data in aircraft cockpits.
BUSINESS
August 4, 1992 | DEAN TAKAHASHI
Sundstrand Corp. will shut down an aerospace parts manufacturing plant here over the next 14 months and lay off as many as 225 employees in a consolidation, the company confirmed Monday. The company will shift the plant's operations of building commercial and military electrical power systems to a newly acquired, half-empty plant in Ohio, said Gary Hedges, spokesman for Rockford, Ill.-based Sundstrand.
BUSINESS
June 27, 1991
Sundstrand Corp. is moving its aviation parts manufacturing subsidiary with 110 employees to Redmond, Wash., as part of a consolidation, a company spokesman said Wednesday. Global Wulfsberg Systems Co., which makes navigation and communication equipment for small aircraft, will move sometime between July and September, said Claude Vernam, a Sundstrand spokesman. "We had two similar businesses in two places and we chose to consolidate in Redmond, where the operation was bigger," Vernam said.
BUSINESS
January 13, 1989 | From Times staff and wire service reports
Sundstrand Corp. may pay the Pentagon nearly $100 million to settle questionable billing practices, compounding the effect of a record criminal fine levied against the military contractor last year, Business Week magazine reported in its latest edition. Quoting unidentified sources, it said the Defense Department is preparing what the magazine called an administrative settlement in which Sundstrand would make payments both in cash and contract price guarantees to resolve the billing problem.
BUSINESS
October 6, 1990 | Associated Press
Aerospace contractor Sundstrand Corp. and industrial equipment maker Milton Roy Co. have announced the signing of a merger agreement expected to be implemented about year-end. Milton Roy sees the merger as a way to broaden its distribution base.
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