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March 7, 2010 | By Ned Parker and Raheem Salman
Hassan Suneid remembers the time the cattle prod stopped working as his guards were torturing him. He kept screaming louder and louder, hoping to fool his tormentors, but they quickly realized he was overacting. Other times, he says, he tried to bore them by showing no reaction whatsoever. "Prison gives the human another personality, makes him tougher and patient in order to solve the problems and to not feel the pain from anything," said Suneid, who was sent to prison under Saddam Hussein and is now a senior leader of Prime Minister Nouri Maliki's Islamic Dawa Party.
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WORLD
March 7, 2010 | By Ned Parker and Raheem Salman
Hassan Suneid remembers the time the cattle prod stopped working as his guards were torturing him. He kept screaming louder and louder, hoping to fool his tormentors, but they quickly realized he was overacting. Other times, he says, he tried to bore them by showing no reaction whatsoever. "Prison gives the human another personality, makes him tougher and patient in order to solve the problems and to not feel the pain from anything," said Suneid, who was sent to prison under Saddam Hussein and is now a senior leader of Prime Minister Nouri Maliki's Islamic Dawa Party.
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WORLD
October 4, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Judges have postponed the verdict in the war crimes trial of ousted President Saddam Hussein, an Iraqi court announced Tuesday, a delay that comes amid growing concern that any ruling would sharpen Iraq's deadly sectarian divide. A death sentence for the former leader could enrage Sunni Arabs, while anything less is sure to spark Shiite fury. When the trial began nearly a year ago, U.S. and Iraqi officials touted the tribunal as a way to help heal Iraq's divisions.
WORLD
July 24, 2008 | Ned Parker and Saif Hameed, Times Staff Writers
Iraq's Presidency Council vetoed a newly approved provincial election bill, casting doubt on the possibility that local elections will be held this year. U.S. officials have identified the vote as pivotal for stabilizing Iraq. Iraqi President Jalal Talabani had denounced the measure, siding with fellow Kurds who walked out of parliament Tuesday over a controversial provision that would delay elections in Tamim province and its capital, the disputed oil-rich city of Kirkuk.
WORLD
May 31, 2008 | Ned Parker and Saif Hameed, Times Staff Writers
Thousands of supporters of Shiite Muslim cleric Muqtada Sadr protested Friday against any security agreement between the U.S. government and Iraq that would keep American forces in the country for years. Protests were held in several cities, as Sadr's followers angrily voiced their opposition to negotiations that call for U.S. troops or military bases to remain in Iraq. Waving Iraqi flags, some protesters in Sadr City shouted: "No, no, no to the occupation!" A small group burned an effigy of Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri Maliki.
WORLD
February 10, 2008 | Garrett Therolf, Times Staff Writer
A potential security crisis loomed Saturday in troubled Diyala province as significant numbers of a U.S.-funded force of Sunni fighters left their posts, demanding the ouster of the provincial police chief. "You can imagine what danger will face the region in the next days," said Abu Talib, commander of 2,000 to 3,000 so-called Sons of Iraq fighters. His men, many of them former insurgents, turned against the militant group Al Qaeda in Iraq last year under the Awakening banner.
WORLD
October 2, 2010 | By Ned Parker and Raheem Salman, Los Angeles Times
Shiite Muslim cleric Muqtada Sadr's political movement announced its support Friday for Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri Maliki's bid for a second term, a significant boost for him despite many remaining obstacles to his bid to continue leading the country. Rival Shiite religious factions are in negotiations to form an alliance with Maliki's chief competitor in March parliamentary elections, former Prime Minister Iyad Allawi, a secular politician. Hassan Suneid, a member of Maliki's bloc, said the Sadr bloc's endorsement would help pave the way for forming a government and holding regular parliamentary sessions.
WORLD
May 21, 2008 | Alexandra Zavis and Raheem Salman, Times Staff Writers
Sadr City residents awoke Tuesday to a sight many had not seen in years: Iraqi soldiers deployed in the deepest reaches of the Baghdad district that is a bastion of militiamen loyal to radical Shiite Muslim cleric Muqtada Sadr. U.S. and Iraqi officials declared the operation, which took place after talks with Sadr's followers and met with no resistance, a turning point in efforts to restore government authority in areas long controlled by armed factions. But it remains to be seen how Sadr's Mahdi Army militia responds when the Iraqi troops begin searching for weapons and detaining wanted fighters.
WORLD
November 25, 2010 | By Ned Parker, Los Angeles Times
Anti-U.S. cleric Muqtada Sadr, whose feared militia was crushed by Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri Maliki two years ago, has leveraged support for his former enemy's government into renewed influence over the country's security forces, governors' offices and even its prisons. In recent months, Maliki's government has freed hundreds of controversial members of the Shiite Muslim cleric's Mahdi Army and handed security positions to veteran commanders of the militia, which was blamed for some of the most disturbing violence in the country's civil war and insurgency against U.S. forces.
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