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SCIENCE
May 3, 2008 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
New evidence confirms that the sunflower was domesticated in Mexico more than 4,600 years ago, researchers say, contrary to the widely held belief that it was converted into a food crop only in the Mississippi Valley. "Given all the available data, the best explanation is that the sunflower was domesticated twice," said archaeologist David L. Lentz of the University of Cincinnati. The sunflower has been an important food crop in the Americas, both for its high fat content and its oil.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 2014 | By Samantha Schaefer
The cloudy morning was brightening, the pavement turning hot. The L.A. Marathon had been on for about four hours, and at the corner of Santa Monica Boulevard and Crescent Drive in Beverly Hills - roughly the 16-mile mark - dozens of volunteers edged the course, eagerly bopping along with outstretched arms, handing water to passing runners.  A pair of Boy Scouts tossed water onto grateful race participants. A runner leaned her head back and spread her arms, letting the water hit her. A beaming Jordyn Jackson, 13, handed out cups to loping marathoners.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 2014 | By Samantha Schaefer
The cloudy morning was brightening, the pavement turning hot. The L.A. Marathon had been on for about four hours, and at the corner of Santa Monica Boulevard and Crescent Drive in Beverly Hills - roughly the 16-mile mark - dozens of volunteers edged the course, eagerly bopping along with outstretched arms, handing water to passing runners.  A pair of Boy Scouts tossed water onto grateful race participants. A runner leaned her head back and spread her arms, letting the water hit her. A beaming Jordyn Jackson, 13, handed out cups to loping marathoners.
NEWS
January 25, 2012 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Rejoice, those who love fried foods: eating them may not put you at higher risk for coronary heart disease--if you're frying those foods in olive or sunflower oils. A study published this week in the British Medical Journal analyzed data on 40,757 Spanish adults age 29 to 69 who were followed for an average 11 years. Free of coronary heart disease at the beginning of the study, they were asked what they ate and what cooking methods they used, then were tracked to see who developed coronary heart disease and who died.
TRAVEL
June 8, 1997
Judi Birnberg's picture of sunflowers near Poitiers, France (Best Shot, May 25) brought back fond memories of two summers I spent in France going to school. If we knew in what direction she was facing when she snapped the shot, we would know what time of day it was, dusk or dawn. I remember driving from Paris early in the day, and every flower in every field would be facing one way and turning another on my way back to town later. The French word for sunflower is tournesol, literally translated as "turn sun."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 1990
From the beginning I was captivated by the auditory and visual experience of "Fantasia." I could imagine a kindly and wise Uncle Walt, orchestrating his vision of a world where music and life supersede all other petty concerns. This pleasant mood was shattered by a thunderbolt about two-thirds into the film when, in a pastoral scene set to Beethoven's Sixth Symphony, I briefly glimpsed two zebra-striped, brown-skinned female centaurs serving a fat little Caucasian cherub as if they were his slaves.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1999 | MATTHEW EBNET, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She is hiding, not just from the television reporters but from memories, and from guilt. She goes for long drives and discreetly leaves sunflowers at a Costa Mesa preschool. She knows the man accused of plunging his Cadillac into the preschool's playground last week, killing two children, injuring five other people and reportedly saying afterward that he did it because of her. Steve Abrams, 39, told police he was expressing frustration over a failed relationship with the 26-year-old Costa Mesa woman.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1986 | MAYERENE BARKER
Large clusters of sunflowers with their bright yellow, daisy-like blooms can be seen along Southern California roadsides throughout the year. There are many varieties of this leafy perennial, introduced to the western United States from the plains states, where it grows abundantly in fields and prairies from Minnesota to Texas. Pictured here are sunflowers growing along Chatsworth Street near Tampa Avenue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1998 | DANA PARSONS
The defense attorney blamed his own bad judgment. The mother blamed her own bad parenting. Thousands of Koreans who petitioned the judge blamed a lack of American understanding for a seemingly peculiar nuance of Korean culture. But after all the blame had been parceled out, Judge Eileen Moore shoved it aside and sentenced 24-year-old Jeen Han to prison for a long, long time.
SCIENCE
May 3, 2008 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
New evidence confirms that the sunflower was domesticated in Mexico more than 4,600 years ago, researchers say, contrary to the widely held belief that it was converted into a food crop only in the Mississippi Valley. "Given all the available data, the best explanation is that the sunflower was domesticated twice," said archaeologist David L. Lentz of the University of Cincinnati. The sunflower has been an important food crop in the Americas, both for its high fat content and its oil.
BOOKS
August 26, 2007 | Arthur Phillips, Arthur Phillips' "Prague" won the 2003 Los Angeles Times' Art Seidenbaum Award for First Fiction. His most recent novel is "Angelica."
MAYBE I should just write, "Read 'Sunflower' " and leave it at that. Otherwise, I might lose control; fans of the great Hungarian novelist Gyula Krúdy (1878-1933) tend toward gibberish when trying to explain his unique appeal. Here, for example, is one of his translators, the usually sober-minded poet George Szirtes, describing Krúdy's Sindbad stories (no relation to the Arab sailor): "The language comes to pieces . . . leaving a curiously sweet erotic vacuum, like an ache without a centre."
HOME & GARDEN
March 24, 2005 | Ann Brenoff, Times Staff Writer
What is it about the sunflower -- the bloom that Vincent van Gogh immortalized, that Kansas bestowed state honors on, that the avian crowd treats as a neon welcome mat -- that brings an instant smile to children's faces? "It's the most human-looking of all plants," says Larry Kleingartner, executive director of the National Sunflower Assn. "They look like they are alive.
HOME & GARDEN
August 14, 2003 | Tina Daunt, Times Staff Writer
Morning glories open at daybreak, but moonflowers wait until after dusk. And 4-o'clocks? Better check for their blooms about 5; they're pretty lazy. If you poke the touch-me-nots, they shrivel up and play dead. But the cactus, known as Old Man, will stay put while you groom its tuft of white hair with a Barbie brush. Kids everywhere are discovering the wonder of plants -- their distinctive personalities, their surprising quirks, their comical sides.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 2002 | RICHARD FAUSSET and CAROL CHAMBERS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Biologists working for the developer of a proposed 21,700-home project near Santa Clarita have found a sunflower on the site not seen since 1937 and thought to have been extinct. The same developer, Newhall Land & Farming Co., on Friday was charged with a misdemeanor on suspicion of altering a streambed in the area. The 10-to 12-foot Los Angeles sunflower was found on a boggy bank along the Santa Clara River.
FOOD
August 1, 2001 | CINDY DORN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
DEAR SOS: Could you please print the recipe for Kansas City Ice Cream? I was going to make some for the Fourth of July but found I had lost the recipe. Everyone was really disappointed. I have been making it for years. It's the best. MARCIA REAVES Covina DEAR MARCIA: Did they all scream for ice cream? Or did they just pout about it? This ran in the Food section July 23, 1987. It's a crowd pleaser.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1999 | MATTHEW EBNET, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She is hiding, not just from the television reporters but from memories, and from guilt. She goes for long drives and discreetly leaves sunflowers at a Costa Mesa preschool. She knows the man accused of plunging his Cadillac into the preschool's playground last week, killing two children, injuring five other people and reportedly saying afterward that he did it because of her. Steve Abrams, 39, told police he was expressing frustration over a failed relationship with the 26-year-old Costa Mesa woman.
HOME & GARDEN
July 25, 1998 | JANICE JONES DODDS
A cottage made of sunflowers sounds like a storybook fantasy. But just such a place is blooming at the Fullerton Arboretum Children's Garden. And it isn't too late to plant and enjoy one in a sunny spot in your yard or garden. You can include a "roof" made of morning glories. Building a Sunflower House 1. Select a site with full sun and good drainage. 2. Determine shape and size, but keep dimensions small, or the morning glories won't form a roof.
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