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Sunil Gulati

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November 24, 2012 | By Kevin Baxter
Sunil Gulati knows economics. So much so that students at Columbia, where he is a senior lecturer, have been known to spend as many as 13 hours in a registration line to get a spot in his class. Gulati also knows soccer. So much so that Alan Rothenberg, the founder of Major League Soccer, called him "the single most important person in the development of soccer in this country. " Now we're about to discover whether Gulati knows how to make the two work together because Wednesday, Gulati, president of U.S. Soccer, announced the formation of an eight-team women's professional league that will begin play in the spring.
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SPORTS
October 9, 2013 | By Kevin Baxter
The U.S. Soccer Federation, still angry over being passed over in the bidding for the 2022 World Cup, said Wednesday it is unlikely to try to bring the sport's premier event back to North America unless significant changes are made in way host countries are chosen. Sunil Gulati, president of the U.S. federation and a member of FIFA's executive committee, said factors other than soccer swayed voters to award the 2022 tournament to the oil-rich state of Qatar, which spent lavishly in an attempt to raise its global profile.
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SPORTS
August 26, 2010 | Grahame L. Jones, On Soccer
The tiresome dance involving U.S. national team Coach Bob Bradley and U.S. Soccer is getting on my nerves. Does he want to stay? Does the federation want him back? Does anyone outside of the small band of U.S. soccer fanatics really give two figs one way or another? Bradley has been a success. So keep him. Stop messing about. Just throw some more money at him — his $600,000 salary, plus bonuses, is a pitiful amount and should at least be doubled — and let him get on with the job. Bradley has been a failure.
SPORTS
November 24, 2012 | By Kevin Baxter
Sunil Gulati knows economics. So much so that students at Columbia, where he is a senior lecturer, have been known to spend as many as 13 hours in a registration line to get a spot in his class. Gulati also knows soccer. So much so that Alan Rothenberg, the founder of Major League Soccer, called him "the single most important person in the development of soccer in this country. " Now we're about to discover whether Gulati knows how to make the two work together because Wednesday, Gulati, president of U.S. Soccer, announced the formation of an eight-team women's professional league that will begin play in the spring.
SPORTS
June 24, 2010 | By Ken Bensinger
The U.S. soccer team is enjoying its greatest success in 80 years, but the hunt to bring America the World Cup goes far beyond the next two weeks in South Africa. Even as the national squad prepares to play Ghana on Saturday, U.S. soccer officials are racing to secure the country's bid to host the World Cup in 2018 or 2022. Leading the charge is Sunil Gulati, president of the U.S. Soccer Federation and chairman of the USA Bid Committee. In that role, he coordinates efforts to convince the bigwigs of FIFA that the U.S. and not Japan, Qatar, Russia or eight other countries deserve to get the nod. A final decision will be made Dec. 2. In the meantime, win or lose in Johannesburg, Gulati will be focused on one goal.
SPORTS
August 30, 2010 | By Grahame L. Jones
Bob Bradley will remain as coach of the U.S. men's national soccer team for another four years, U.S. Soccer announced Monday afternoon. The 52-year-old Manhattan Beach resident guided the U.S. into the second round of the World Cup this summer after winning the CONCACAF Gold Cup in 2008 and finishing in first place, ahead of Mexico, in regional qualifying for South Africa 2010. His record since taking charge of the American team in 2007 is 38-20-8, and his most notable victory came when the U.S. beat European champion Spain in the semifinals of last year's Confederations Cup in South Africa.
SPORTS
October 9, 2013 | By Kevin Baxter
The U.S. Soccer Federation, still angry over being passed over in the bidding for the 2022 World Cup, said Wednesday it is unlikely to try to bring the sport's premier event back to North America unless significant changes are made in way host countries are chosen. Sunil Gulati, president of the U.S. federation and a member of FIFA's executive committee, said factors other than soccer swayed voters to award the 2022 tournament to the oil-rich state of Qatar, which spent lavishly in an attempt to raise its global profile.
SPORTS
November 27, 2010 | By Philip Hersh
Now that the United States has overcome the discomfiting situation of needing to win a playoff series to qualify for the 2011 women's World Cup, the question is whether getting into such a predicament was a one-time fluke or part of an emerging pattern. The U.S. earned the final spot in the 16-team World Cup field with two 1-0 victories in the aggregate-goals playoff with Italy, adding Saturday's victory at Toyota Park to the one Nov. 20 in Padua, Italy. For the country that had dominated women's soccer since winning the inaugural World Cup in 1991, just being in danger of not making the sixth World Cup next summer in Germany may be the jolt needed to keep the U.S. program among the world leaders.
SPORTS
June 30, 2010 | Grahame L. Jones, On Soccer
T.C. Boyle could not have invented a more disparate or odd set of characters, or have placed them in a stranger setting. There they were, at night, in a luxury suite in a soccer stadium in the middle of the South African bushveld, within walking distance of a snake park advertising 40 varieties of reptile and a curio stand offering life-size wooden replicas of animals that once roamed free but long since ceased to do so. They were five...
SPORTS
July 29, 2011 | By Grahame L. Jones
The baker's son from Goeppingen, Germany, has finally hit the big time! If that was the reaction Friday to the news that Juergen Klinsmann had been named coach of the U.S. national soccer team, then it was way, way off the mark. Klinsmann, who turns 47 on Saturday, has been a household name in international soccer for more than two decades, so the fact that he has become the 35th man to hold the U.S. men's soccer coaching reins is only the latest step — or misstep — in an already storied career.
SPORTS
July 29, 2011 | By Grahame L. Jones
The baker's son from Goeppingen, Germany, has finally hit the big time! If that was the reaction Friday to the news that Juergen Klinsmann had been named coach of the U.S. national soccer team, then it was way, way off the mark. Klinsmann, who turns 47 on Saturday, has been a household name in international soccer for more than two decades, so the fact that he has become the 35th man to hold the U.S. men's soccer coaching reins is only the latest step — or misstep — in an already storied career.
SPORTS
December 2, 2010 | By Grahame L. Jones
Former President Bill Clinton's speech ran long and wandered off point. Actor Morgan Freeman lost his place in the script. Landon Donovan kept it brief. But Sunil Gulati, the president of U.S. Soccer, saved the day in Switzerland on Wednesday by telling the 22 members of FIFA's executive committee in Zurich exactly what they wanted to hear. Staging the World Cup in the United States in 2022 would produce a financial windfall for international soccer's governing body, Gulati said, with the event raking in more money for FIFA than it could imagine.
SPORTS
November 27, 2010 | By Philip Hersh
Now that the United States has overcome the discomfiting situation of needing to win a playoff series to qualify for the 2011 women's World Cup, the question is whether getting into such a predicament was a one-time fluke or part of an emerging pattern. The U.S. earned the final spot in the 16-team World Cup field with two 1-0 victories in the aggregate-goals playoff with Italy, adding Saturday's victory at Toyota Park to the one Nov. 20 in Padua, Italy. For the country that had dominated women's soccer since winning the inaugural World Cup in 1991, just being in danger of not making the sixth World Cup next summer in Germany may be the jolt needed to keep the U.S. program among the world leaders.
SPORTS
August 30, 2010 | By Grahame L. Jones
Bob Bradley will remain as coach of the U.S. men's national soccer team for another four years, U.S. Soccer announced Monday afternoon. The 52-year-old Manhattan Beach resident guided the U.S. into the second round of the World Cup this summer after winning the CONCACAF Gold Cup in 2008 and finishing in first place, ahead of Mexico, in regional qualifying for South Africa 2010. His record since taking charge of the American team in 2007 is 38-20-8, and his most notable victory came when the U.S. beat European champion Spain in the semifinals of last year's Confederations Cup in South Africa.
SPORTS
August 26, 2010 | Grahame L. Jones, On Soccer
The tiresome dance involving U.S. national team Coach Bob Bradley and U.S. Soccer is getting on my nerves. Does he want to stay? Does the federation want him back? Does anyone outside of the small band of U.S. soccer fanatics really give two figs one way or another? Bradley has been a success. So keep him. Stop messing about. Just throw some more money at him — his $600,000 salary, plus bonuses, is a pitiful amount and should at least be doubled — and let him get on with the job. Bradley has been a failure.
SPORTS
June 30, 2010 | Grahame L. Jones, On Soccer
T.C. Boyle could not have invented a more disparate or odd set of characters, or have placed them in a stranger setting. There they were, at night, in a luxury suite in a soccer stadium in the middle of the South African bushveld, within walking distance of a snake park advertising 40 varieties of reptile and a curio stand offering life-size wooden replicas of animals that once roamed free but long since ceased to do so. They were five...
SPORTS
December 2, 2010 | By Grahame L. Jones
Former President Bill Clinton's speech ran long and wandered off point. Actor Morgan Freeman lost his place in the script. Landon Donovan kept it brief. But Sunil Gulati, the president of U.S. Soccer, saved the day in Switzerland on Wednesday by telling the 22 members of FIFA's executive committee in Zurich exactly what they wanted to hear. Staging the World Cup in the United States in 2022 would produce a financial windfall for international soccer's governing body, Gulati said, with the event raking in more money for FIFA than it could imagine.
SPORTS
June 28, 2010 | By Grahame L. Jones and Kevin Baxter
Reporting from Johannesburg, South Africa — Bob Bradley's future as the U.S. national team coach will not be decided in the coming days or weeks but only after discussions between him and Sunil Gulati , the president of U.S. Soccer. "I want to hear his views, express some of mine and see what makes sense," Gulati said Monday morning in Johannesburg. "He's done a very good job. I want to make that very clear. . . . The problem is that our expectations have risen pretty sharply and there have been some performances where we didn't play as well as we would have liked."
SPORTS
June 28, 2010 | By Grahame L. Jones and Kevin Baxter
Reporting from Johannesburg, South Africa — Bob Bradley's future as the U.S. national team coach will not be decided in the coming days or weeks but only after discussions between him and Sunil Gulati , the president of U.S. Soccer. "I want to hear his views, express some of mine and see what makes sense," Gulati said Monday morning in Johannesburg. "He's done a very good job. I want to make that very clear. . . . The problem is that our expectations have risen pretty sharply and there have been some performances where we didn't play as well as we would have liked."
SPORTS
June 24, 2010 | By Ken Bensinger
The U.S. soccer team is enjoying its greatest success in 80 years, but the hunt to bring America the World Cup goes far beyond the next two weeks in South Africa. Even as the national squad prepares to play Ghana on Saturday, U.S. soccer officials are racing to secure the country's bid to host the World Cup in 2018 or 2022. Leading the charge is Sunil Gulati, president of the U.S. Soccer Federation and chairman of the USA Bid Committee. In that role, he coordinates efforts to convince the bigwigs of FIFA that the U.S. and not Japan, Qatar, Russia or eight other countries deserve to get the nod. A final decision will be made Dec. 2. In the meantime, win or lose in Johannesburg, Gulati will be focused on one goal.
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