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Sunland Ca Development And Redevelopment

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1996 | DARRELL SATZMAN
The city of Los Angeles will conduct a public hearing today to discuss the most recent proposal to build a golf course in environmentally sensitive Big Tujunga Wash. Since 1987, developer Cosmo World Corp. has waged a protracted battle with neighbors, environmentalists, the state Department of Fish and Game and the Army Corps of Engineers to build the course.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1997 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to save sensitive plant habitat, the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy made an offer Tuesday to buy 350 acres of land in Big Tujunga Wash--an area now planned for development as an 18-hole public golf course. Conservancy leaders declined to provide details of their meeting Tuesday with the Foothill Golf Development Group, which plans to build the project. But a spokesman for the golf developer said a sale is unlikely.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1997
Opponents of a proposed 18-hole golf course in Big Tujunga Canyon, including environmentalists and Native Americans, warned a City Council panel Tuesday that the development would ruin sensitive plant habitat and lead to an "ecological disaster." About 30 people urged the council's Planning and Land Use Committee to reject the 350-acre project proposed by Foothills Golf Development Group.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1997
Opponents of a proposed 18-hole golf course in Big Tujunga Canyon, including environmentalists and Native Americans, warned a City Council panel Tuesday that the development would ruin sensitive plant habitat and lead to an "ecological disaster." About 30 people urged the council's Planning and Land Use Committee to reject the 350-acre project proposed by Foothills Golf Development Group.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1997 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to save sensitive plant habitat, the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy made an offer Tuesday to buy 350 acres of land in Big Tujunga Wash--an area now planned for development as an 18-hole public golf course. Conservancy leaders declined to provide details of their meeting Tuesday with the Foothill Golf Development Group, which plans to build the project. But a spokesman for the golf developer said a sale is unlikely.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 1996 | DARRELL SATZMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Delivering a setback to environmentalists, the Los Angeles Planning Commission unanimously approved a proposal Thursday to build a public golf course and preserve on 160 acres of the ecologically sensitive Big Tujunga Wash. Although opponents said they will appeal the decision to the City Council, the commission action is a significant victory for developers, who battled for years with environmentalists, neighbors and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.
NEWS
February 24, 1997 | JILL LEOVY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In this far corner of the northeast San Fernando Valley, motorists on the Foothill Freeway pass an embattled landscape-- a strange, rocky plain that is one of the world's rarest habitats. For a decade, developers fighting to build a golf course over what's called Big Tujunga Wash have been held at bay by the presence of a federally listed endangered wildflower on the site. But this last large, natural wash spilling down from the San Gabriel Mountains into the L.A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1993 | CARMEN VALENCIA
A city planning official fashioned a compromise to allow the installation of a cellular phone antenna facility on a Sunland hillside, but both the applicant and nearby homeowners vow to appeal the decision. After conducting a hearing Monday at the Van Nuys Woman's Club, zoning administrator Albert Landini approved a permit request by L.A. Cellular Telephone Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1994 | ED BOND
Thursday's groundbreaking for the $2.2 million renovation and expansion of the Sunland-Tujunga Library could mean that the city is taking note of this community, residents said. "We're obtaining our fair share, finally," said Joan Slater, president of the Sunland-Tujunga Chamber of Commerce. "We've gotten nothing, really, from the city, for many years," she said. The renovation project is being funded through bond money approved by voters in 1989 to rebuild and create city libraries.
NEWS
February 24, 1997 | JILL LEOVY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In this far corner of the northeast San Fernando Valley, motorists on the Foothill Freeway pass an embattled landscape-- a strange, rocky plain that is one of the world's rarest habitats. For a decade, developers fighting to build a golf course over what's called Big Tujunga Wash have been held at bay by the presence of a federally listed endangered wildflower on the site. But this last large, natural wash spilling down from the San Gabriel Mountains into the L.A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 1996 | DARRELL SATZMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Delivering a setback to environmentalists, the Los Angeles Planning Commission unanimously approved a proposal Thursday to build a public golf course and preserve on 160 acres of the ecologically sensitive Big Tujunga Wash. Although opponents said they will appeal the decision to the City Council, the commission action is a significant victory for developers, who battled for years with environmentalists, neighbors and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1996 | DARRELL SATZMAN
The city of Los Angeles will conduct a public hearing today to discuss the most recent proposal to build a golf course in environmentally sensitive Big Tujunga Wash. Since 1987, developer Cosmo World Corp. has waged a protracted battle with neighbors, environmentalists, the state Department of Fish and Game and the Army Corps of Engineers to build the course.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1994 | ED BOND
Thursday's groundbreaking for the $2.2 million renovation and expansion of the Sunland-Tujunga Library could mean that the city is taking note of this community, residents said. "We're obtaining our fair share, finally," said Joan Slater, president of the Sunland-Tujunga Chamber of Commerce. "We've gotten nothing, really, from the city, for many years," she said. The renovation project is being funded through bond money approved by voters in 1989 to rebuild and create city libraries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1993 | CARMEN VALENCIA
A city planning official fashioned a compromise to allow the installation of a cellular phone antenna facility on a Sunland hillside, but both the applicant and nearby homeowners vow to appeal the decision. After conducting a hearing Monday at the Van Nuys Woman's Club, zoning administrator Albert Landini approved a permit request by L.A. Cellular Telephone Co.
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