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ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 2012
In Sunlight and in Shadow A Novel Mark Helprin Houghton Mifflin Harcourt: 720 pp., $28
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NATIONAL
March 4, 2014 | By Evan Halper
WASHINGTON - As international efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions stall, schemes to slow global warming using fantastical technologies once dismissed as a sideshow are getting serious consideration in Washington. Ships that spew salt into the air to block sunlight. Mirrored satellites designed to bounce solar rays back into space. Massive "reverse" power plants that would suck carbon from the atmosphere. These are among the ideas the National Academy of Sciences has charged a panel of some of the nation's top climate thinkers to investigate.
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HOME & GARDEN
January 9, 2010
Luster Leaf is best known for digital monitors that check the pH and moisture levels of your soil, but the company's SunCalc targets a different variable: light. The "sunlight calculator" measures the amount of sunshine that actually reaches a specific spot during a 12-hour period -- key to determining which plants should go where. A University of Maine global warming monitoring station put the SunCalc through its paces, and it ultimately performed on a par with the school's radiometer.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2013
'Sunlight Jr.' Not rated Running time: 1 hour, 35 minutes Playing: Laemmle's Royal Theatre, West Los Angeles
NEWS
December 15, 2010 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times
If you’re feeling just a little depressed and lethargic¬† this time of year, go ahead and blame the universe – specifically the sun. The cause may be seasonal affective disorder, which ties the blahs to waning winter sunlight. SAD, as it's called, usually affects people who live in northern states where days are short and darker during winter months. This HealthKey article lists symptoms as: "… Oversleeping, daytime fatigue, carbohydrate craving and weight gain as signs of SAD, as well as symptoms of generalized depression, such as decreased sexual interest, lethargy, hopelessness, suicidal thoughts and loss of interest in your normal activities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 2011 | By Dean Kuipers
A new discovery from a chemist at the University of Texas at Austin may allow photovoltaic solar cells to double their efficiency, thus providing loads more electrical power from regular sunlight. Not only that, but it's way cheap. Chemistry professor Xiaoyang Zhu and his team discovered that an organic plastic semiconductor could double the number of electrons harvested out of one photon of sunlight. Yep, plastic. For the Record, 12:15 p.m. Dec. 19.: An earlier version of this online article incorrectly said Queen's University is in Toronto.
SCIENCE
April 4, 2009 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Arctic sea ice is melting so fast most of it could be gone in 30 years. A new analysis using complex computer models of weather and climate says conditions that had been forecast by the end of the century could occur much sooner. The ice is important because the white surface reflects sunlight back into space. When ice is replaced by dark water, sunlight can warm the water and increase warming of the planet. The new report appears in Friday's edition of the journal Geophysical Research Letters.
REAL ESTATE
September 7, 1986
Ask any optician how he can tell if a glass for eyeglasses is heat treated--tempered "Safety Glass Law to Affect Escrows" (Aug. 24). He would look at it with a polariscope. With a glass door you could hold Polaroid eyeglasses on each side and look through and move lenses about at the same time. Sunlight on a thick glass door at a bank, for example, will look like dark areas all over it, about three inches apart. AL ASHWORTH San Clemente
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2013 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Michelle Pfeiffer revealed an interesting tidbit over the weekend: She was once unwittingly a member of a cult. Pfeiffer told the Daily Telegraph's Sunday magazine, Stella, that as an up-and-coming actress, around age 20, she'd fallen in with a Los Angeles couple who acted as "kind of personal trainers" and were "very controlling. " Now a strict vegan, Pfeiffer was put on a diet by the unnamed couple, who also worked with weight training. "Their thing was vegetarianism," she said (via the Daily Telegraph )
HEALTH
January 28, 2008 | Chris Woolston, Special to The Times
The products: We all carry the residue of modern living deep within our bodies. We get mercury from fish, pesticides from apples and polyvinyl chlorides from that "new-car smell." A 2005 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study of more than 2,000 people across the country found traces of more than 60 toxic compounds, including such nasty stuff as dioxins and uranium, in the blood and urine of participants.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Early on in the excellent new indie drama "Sunlight Jr.," a thunderstorm turns the Florida sky a low-hanging gray. A car runs out of gas. A couple on their last dime are stranded - on the roadside and in lives as empty of promise as that tank. The scene is a modern-day reality and "Sunlight's" central metaphor. Filmmaker Laurie Collyer uses a conspiracy of hardships to set the tone for this bittersweet romance. The film stars Naomi Watts and Matt Dillon as Melissa and Richie, the down-market lovers who will take us into a world of suburban decay where the American Dream is reflected in the broken glass of bankrupt stripmalls.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2013 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Michelle Pfeiffer revealed an interesting tidbit over the weekend: She was once unwittingly a member of a cult. Pfeiffer told the Daily Telegraph's Sunday magazine, Stella, that as an up-and-coming actress, around age 20, she'd fallen in with a Los Angeles couple who acted as "kind of personal trainers" and were "very controlling. " Now a strict vegan, Pfeiffer was put on a diet by the unnamed couple, who also worked with weight training. "Their thing was vegetarianism," she said (via the Daily Telegraph )
OPINION
November 3, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
When Congress passed the Dodd-Frank law in 2010, it included a little-noticed provision requiring financial companies and banks to provide greater disclosure to customers sending money overseas. Last week, the new rules took effect, guaranteeing consumers much-needed protections and greater transparency. Until now, banks and money-transfer companies have been required to comply with federal laws aimed at curbing money laundering and fighting terrorism. But there have been no federal regulations in place mandating what they were required to disclose to consumers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall, Los Angeles Times
Teams will fan out across the Sierra Nevada on Thursday to perform their final snow survey of the season, a closely watched rite of spring that helps determine how much water will flow to farms and cities in coming months. But 18,000 feet above the Sierra slopes, an airborne experiment is underway that could revolutionize that ritual. Starting in early April, researchers have made weekly flights over the upper Tuolumne River basin, taking sophisticated instrument readings of the snow depth and reflected sunlight.
SCIENCE
February 12, 2013 | By Monte Morin, Los Angeles Times
Ancient plant and animal matter trapped within Arctic permafrost can be converted rapidly into climate-warming carbon dioxide when melted and exposed to sunlight, according to a new study. In a report published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , a team of environmental and biological scientists examined 27 melting permafrost sites in Alaska and found that bacteria converted dissolved organic carbon materials into the greenhouse gas CO2 40% faster when exposed to ultraviolet light.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 2012
In Sunlight and in Shadow A Novel Mark Helprin Houghton Mifflin Harcourt: 720 pp., $28
MAGAZINE
September 21, 2003
Even before modernist innovators such as Alfred Stieglitz began to explore photography as an art form, its status as an "objective" record of literal reality was open to debate. These days, however, digital technology has taken the medium's creative possibilities into a new era. Thanks to Photoshop and similar programs, the lines between photography, collage, sometimes even drawing and painting, are growing ever blurrier.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 2000 | AL MARTINEZ
Just about everything to be said about last week's Democratic convention has already been said and all of the pictures shown, so what am I doing here? We've heard the LAPD applaud its restraint, the protesters applaud their restraint, television applaud its restraint and the Democrats applaud their restraint.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 2012 | Steve Lopez
FRESNO - It was around 2 o'clock, temperatures rising under an arcing sun, when I met two workers on a peach farm near here recently. One had first entered the country illegally nearly 40 years ago but later became a U.S. citizen at a time when the process wasn't so difficult and politicized. He became a foreman, and he and his wife raised three children who went to California universities and got good jobs. The second worker, who was thinning peach trees, is here illegally from Mexico.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 2011 | By Dean Kuipers
A new discovery from a chemist at the University of Texas at Austin may allow photovoltaic solar cells to double their efficiency, thus providing loads more electrical power from regular sunlight. Not only that, but it's way cheap. Chemistry professor Xiaoyang Zhu and his team discovered that an organic plastic semiconductor could double the number of electrons harvested out of one photon of sunlight. Yep, plastic. For the Record, 12:15 p.m. Dec. 19.: An earlier version of this online article incorrectly said Queen's University is in Toronto.
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