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WORLD
July 20, 2006 | Ali Windawi and Julian E. Barnes, Special to The Times
A surge in violence in this oil-rich city divided among Kurds, Sunni Arabs and Turkmens vying for power has alarmed Iraqi officials amid intensifying sectarian warfare in central and southern Iraq. Kirkuk has been contested ground since the 2003 U.S.-led invasion of Iraq, when Kurds displaced by Saddam Hussein and previous Sunni Arab-dominated governments began returning to their former homes.
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WORLD
June 22, 2013 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
CAIRO - Hezbollah's march into the Syrian civil war on behalf of President Bashar Assad is adding to tension along sectarian fault lines in a region increasingly roused by geopolitical maneuverings that are fueled by religious passions. Popular uprisings that overthrew secular autocrats in Egypt and other countries once enthralled Shiite and Sunni Muslims alike. But the replacement of fallen leaders by Islamist parties has further provoked the age-old vitriol between the sects, threatening to turn the Syrian battleground into a wider religious war. Hezbollah, long a proxy for Shiite-dominated Iran, is helping battle largely Sunni rebel forces seeking to overthrow Assad, a fellow ally of Iran whose Alawite faith is a spinoff of Shiite Islam.
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WORLD
August 17, 2007 | Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writer
Iraq's Kurdish president and Shiite Muslim prime minister hailed a governing alliance forged Thursday as a major stride toward reuniting the country's ethnically fractured leadership. But with Sunni Arabs refusing to take part in the coalition, it remained doubtful that significant progress toward resolving Iraq's myriad problems would come soon. The political maneuvering in the capital promised to further frustrate efforts by U.S.
WORLD
April 27, 2013 | By Ned Parker, Los Angeles Times
BAGHDAD - Four Iraqi soldiers were shot dead Saturday, the day after Sunni Arab tribes in the restive western province of Anbar announced that they had formed their own army to defend themselves against the Shiite-dominated Iraqi government. The deadly attack came as Sunni gunmen around Iraq clashed with government forces in the aftermath of a government crackdown on Sunni demonstrators Tuesday in northern Iraq. More than 200 people died last week in fighting between Sunnis and Iraqi security forces.
WORLD
March 28, 2005 | Richard Boudreaux, Times Staff Writer
Nearly two months after most of them sat out Iraq's historic election, 200 Sunni Arab leaders gathered to consider a belated plunge into democratic politics. It was not a civil discussion. As a legal scholar was explaining how they could help write a new constitution, a tribal chief cut him off, shouting, "Long live the resistance!" The chief, Mazin Jaber Nima, said the Sunni Arab-led insurgency against American troops would falter if Sunni Arabs joined in the U.S.
WORLD
August 28, 2005 | Borzou Daragahi, Times Staff Writer
Sunni Arabs across the political spectrum closed ranks Saturday, proposing a flurry of amendments to a draft constitution they have condemned, while some officials said negotiations could drag on until a nationwide referendum on the charter scheduled for the fall.
WORLD
February 16, 2005 | Patrick J. McDonnell, Times Staff Writer
An influential, hard-line Sunni Arab group declared Tuesday that it would not help draft Iraq's constitution or participate in the new government without a fixed timetable for the withdrawal of U.S.-led forces. The proclamation by the Muslim Scholars Assn. is an indication of the minefields that lie ahead as Shiite Arab and Kurdish coalitions triumphant in last month's landmark election seek to bring disaffected Sunni Arabs into the political process.
WORLD
June 2, 2007 | Ned Parker, Said Rifai and Saif Hameed, Times Staff Writers
Fighters allied with Al Qaeda battled Iraqi civilians and a nationalist insurgent group in the Amariya neighborhood of west Baghdad this week, in the latest indication of growing internal strife in Iraq's troubled Sunni Arab community. The clashes in the suburb, home during Saddam Hussein's rule to elite civil servants and military officers, appear to be a spillover from the fight against Al Qaeda in Iraq in the neighboring province of Al Anbar and Baghdad's western suburb of Abu Ghraib.
WORLD
July 21, 2005 | Alissa J. Rubin, Times Staff Writer
The Iraqi National Assembly's rush to finish a new constitution by mid-August ran into more trouble Wednesday when the drafting committee's Sunni Muslims halted their work after the assassination of a colleague. The suspension of Sunni Arab participation came on top of continuing deep divisions among committee members over such key issues as the independence of the governorates, control of the oil-rich northern city of Kirkuk and the status of women.
WORLD
September 26, 2006 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
Kurdish militiamen seized a police station in northern Iraq on Monday to prevent its transfer to a new Sunni Arab commander, igniting a daylong standoff that echoed the parliament's continuing unease over territory-sharing in the final administrative map of Iraq. The clash in the town of Jalawla underscored the potential for violence as parliament prepared to study the contentious issue of creating autonomous regions in this multiethnic and heavily armed nation.
NATIONAL
July 25, 2012 | By Brian Bennett, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - The militant organization that was once the scourge of the U.S. militarycampaign in Iraq and probably is responsible for more than 100 deaths in the country over the last few days has set its sights on launching attacks in the United States, intelligence officials said. Al Qaeda in Iraq released a message this week that threatened to strike at the "heart" of the United States, and several associates of the group have been arrested in the U.S. and Canada in the last two years, said American officials, a sign that the organization has tried to establish a network in North America.
WORLD
January 5, 2012 | By Raheem Salman and Alexandra Zavis, Los Angeles Times
A string of explosions targeting Shiite Muslims that killed at least 71 people bore the hallmark of Sunni Arab insurgents who have a history of trying to capitalize on tensions among Iraqi politicians to reignite the communal violence that nearly tore the country apart. The bombings Thursday in the south of Iraq and in mainly Shiite neighborhoods of the capital, Baghdad, were the second major wave of attacks since the last U.S. troops departed from Iraq less than three weeks ago. Sectarian tension has escalated sharply as a political dispute threatens to unravel U.S.-backed power-sharing arrangements among the country's Shiites, Sunni Arabs and ethnic Kurds.
WORLD
December 22, 2011 | By Raheem Salman and Alexandra Zavis, Los Angeles Times
  Sirens wailed, smoke billowed and blood pooled on the pavement. The scenes of devastation were all too familiar after more than a dozen explosions ripped through the Iraqi capital Thursday, killing at least 60 people and injuring nearly 200, just days after the last U.S. troops left the country. The attacks, some of the worst in Iraq this year, came in the midst of a political standoff between the country's main Shiite Muslim and Sunni Arab factions. The dispute threatens to unravel a U.S.-backed power-sharing government, and is spreading anxiety over the prospect of a return to the sectarian bloodletting that devastated the country in recent years.
WORLD
February 25, 2011 | By Ned Parker, Los Angeles Times
Mohamed Albuflasa was different from everyone else taking the stage on the second day of Bahrain's protests. He was a Sunni Muslim. The 34-year-old Salafist favored government reform, and he believed he should speak at the rally to promote unity among the country's Shiite Muslim majority and Sunnis at Manama's Pearl Square. Within hours, a security agency had detained him, and he has not been seen since. Even as hundreds of political prisoners were freed this week by King Hamed ibn Isa Khalifa, Albuflasa remains jailed and his whereabouts a mystery.
WORLD
August 30, 2010 | By Usama Redha and Ned Parker, Los Angeles Times
It has been a month now and still there are no answers. There is just a father gripping the photographs of his son. In one, 21-year-old Ali Mohammed Fakher is in Japan, dressed in his white judo robe; in another, he's on a boat in Turkey with his coach and teammates. Fakher had gone further than any of his family imagined, rising from the rough streets of west Baghdad to become the star player on Iraq's national judo team. On the day before he was to leave Iraq to train for tournaments, he was shot to death as he walked down the main street of his neighborhood.
WORLD
June 17, 2010 | By Ned Parker and Usama Redha, Los Angeles Times
A Sunni paramilitary leader, his wife and two of his sons were assassinated Thursday as attacks continued against members of the groups that helped U.S. troops defeat Al Qaeda in Iraq militants and bring an end to the country's sectarian war. Gunmen opened fire before dawn on the house of Khudair Hamad Saad, a prominent member of the Sunni Arab Awakening movement, in an area outside Fallouja in the western province of Anbar, police said. Saad had been a member of Al Qaeda in Iraq but broke away from the radical group three years ago and joined the Awakening movement in its fight against the insurgents, police said.
WORLD
August 24, 2005 | Edmund Sanders and Noam N. Levey, Times Staff Writers
There are no red states or blue states. Ballots won't have hanging chads. But the fight over Iraq's constitution appears headed for an election day showdown that -- similar to recent U.S. presidential elections -- will be decided by one or two battleground provinces. A draft of the charter is almost certain to win approval this week in the transitional National Assembly, which is dominated by Shiites and Kurds.
WORLD
September 13, 2010 | By Ned Parker, Los Angeles Times
Sheik Sabah Janabi wears a painful-looking metal brace on his left hand, its rods pressing into the puffy flesh like the spring on a mousetrap. He fumbles a Marlboro from a pack with his good hand, sucks in the smoke and frowns. In this farming town that was a center of extremism when Iraq fell into its nihilistic civil war, Janabi sits in a darkened room, his white shirt half tucked in and his blue tie slightly askew. He talks about how gunmen tried to kill him three months ago and describes himself as a leader under siege.
WORLD
May 11, 2010 | By Borzou Daragahi, Los Angeles Times
Militants launched attacks on security forces and Shiite Muslim civilians across Iraq on Monday, killing nearly 100 people in a spree of shootings and bombings that rattled the country and worsened tensions among its political elite. At least 92 Iraqis were killed and more than 300 were injured. The number of dead and wounded rose steadily in the evening as reports trickled in from Mosul in the north, Basra in the far south and points in between. News channels broadcast familiar images of weeping women cloaked in black abayas , mangled vehicles and pools of water tinged with blood.
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