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NEWS
November 14, 1989 | From Associated Press
Salim Hoss, a Sunni Muslim who has been a voice of moderation through 14 years of civil war in Lebanon, returns to the prime minister's office for the fourth time in 13 years to try to end the fighting. The 59-year-old economist is a firm backer of democracy, a free-wheeling economy and Christian-Muslim coexistence. He is married to a Christian. Hoss' main asset is the wide respect he commands among both Christians and Muslims.
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WORLD
April 4, 2014 | By Ramin Mostaghim and Patrick J. McDonnell
TEHRAN -- Four Iranian border guards kidnapped two months ago by Sunni Muslim militants along the nation's southeastern frontier with Pakistan have been released in Pakistan, Iranian news agencies reported Friday. A fifth kidnapped border guard was reported executed last month by his captors. His body has been handed over to Iranian authorities, according to media accounts. The case sparked outrage in Iran and inflamed tension between Iran and Pakistan, where the abducted guards were apparently held.
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WORLD
October 7, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Two bombs exploded at a gathering of about 3,000 Sunni Muslim radicals in the central Pakistani city of Multan, killing at least 36 people and wounding about 100, police said. Officials suspected a sectarian attack. The bombing comes nearly a week after a suicide attack left 31 dead at a Shiite Muslim mosque in an eastern city. A car bomb exploded as people were starting to disperse after the meeting, and two minutes later a second bomb on a motorcycle went off, police said.
WORLD
March 19, 2014 | By Patrick J. McDonnell and Nabih Bulos
BEIRUT - Authorities said roads across Lebanon were reopened Wednesday following a tense evening of road-closing protests linked to the war in neighboring Syria. Clashes erupted late Tuesday between demonstrators and security forces as protesters used burning tires to block a number of roads throughout the country. The army fired warning shots and used tear gas to disperse protesters and several injures were reported, according to local media accounts. Fallout from the Syrian war has resulted in a wave of sectarian-fueled car bombings, gun battles and rocket and mortar strikes in Lebanon, causing profound instability.
NEWS
March 3, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Gunmen tied up and executed seven Sunni Muslim men, apparently in retaliation for the slaughter of Shiite Muslim worshipers last weekend, authorities said. An eighth man who was shot in the head survived, and five women were beaten with rifle butts but were not shot, police said. The massacre occurred in a middle-class Karachi neighborhood near two Shiite mosques where 20 worshipers were fatally shot Saturday.
NEWS
June 4, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
Shia Muslim fighters of the Amal militia, moving behind tank and mortar barrages, stormed through Sunni Muslim strongholds of West Beirut on Tuesday after 15 hours of street battles that killed at least eight people and wounded more than 70, security officials said. The fighting in the Muslim sector--death estimates ran as high as 32--was the worst inter-Muslim bloodletting in Lebanon in six months.
WORLD
December 19, 2010 | By Ned Parker and Raheem Salman, Los Angeles Times
Iraq's parliament knocked away one of the last barriers to forming a new government Saturday when it struck down a ban on three Sunni Muslim politicians. The reinstatement of former lawmaker Saleh Mutlak and two other politicians virtually guaranteed that their secular Iraqiya bloc, popular with Iraq's Sunnis, will join Prime Minister Nouri Maliki's government. Different Iraqi political groups and U.S. officials have pushed for a coalition government with a big role for the country's Sunni minority, who after the U.S.-led invasion in 2003 waged an insurgency against the Americans and the new Shiite elite.
NEWS
December 9, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Clashes over the death of a Sunni Muslim religious leader left five people dead in western Iran, a senior security official in Bakhtaran said. The unrest was sparked by the death last week of Mullah Mohammed Rabii, leader of the Sunni Muslim sect, a minority in overwhelmingly Shiite Iran. Officials said Rabii suffered a heart attack, but his supporters claim he was killed by government agents.
NEWS
October 2, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Gunmen opened fire in a Shiite mosque during morning prayers, one of four attacks on the group that left 14 dead in Pakistan. Police said that a retaliatory assault on a Sunni Muslim school killed four students and that the violence was the latest in a bitter feud between extremist members of the two Muslim branches. The violence began when armed attackers killed nine Shiites in the mosque in the city of Karachi.
NEWS
September 17, 1985
Muslim militiamen fought artillery and mortar duels across the ravaged avenues of the northern Lebanese port of Tripoli, killing at least 34 people and wounding 76 in what Beirut radio called the worst street battles in two years. The fighting was between two Sunni Muslim militias--the pro-Syrian Arab Democratic Party and the Tawhid, or Islamic Unification Movement. Premier Rashid Karami, a Sunni and a native of Tripoli, hinted that he might resign if the fighting continues.
WORLD
February 9, 2014 | By Patrick J. McDonnell
HOMS, Syria - The international community is lauding a United Nations-brokered deal to provide relief to Homs' long-blockaded Old City, but the aid plan is far from universally welcome in this battle-scarred and profoundly divided city. The relief effort has stirred deep animosities among many government supporters, who view it as a sellout to opposition forces - "terrorists," in official terms - hunkered down in the ruins of the Old City. "This is basically giving the terrorists food and medicine and letting them go free," said Rihab Ismael, a dairy worker who lives in the Zahra district, a sniper-plagued zone less than a mile from what remains of the rebel-controlled Old City.
WORLD
January 6, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri Maliki urged the residents of Fallouja to expel Al Qaeda-aligned militants who seized the city last week or deal with an imminent attack by government forces to regain the Sunni Muslim stronghold, news agencies in Baghdad reported Monday. Although the statement issued by Maliki on his Shiite-led government's website appealed for troops to avoid striking civilian areas, it warned of the risks of a military onslaught and armed clash with the Sunni warriors of the Al Qaeda-affiliated Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, or ISIS.
OPINION
September 8, 2013 | By Peter Galbraith
The Obama administration - with the backing of key Republicans in Congress - is poised to embark on a strategy that entails punitive airstrikes on Syrian government positions and stepped-up lethal aid to moderate elements of the Syrian opposition. So far, however, the Syrian opposition has been unable to win significant support from the country's ethnic and religious minorities. Without such support, the opposition is unlikely to prevail even with stepped-up U.S. assistance. Moreover, the inability of the Syrian rebels, who are almost all Sunni Muslim Arabs, to win over the country's Kurds, Alawites and Christians raises the question of whether their victory is even desirable.
WORLD
August 23, 2013 | By Patrick J. McDonnell
BEIRUT -- The toll from a pair of explosions outside two mosques in the northern Lebanese city of Tripoli on Friday has risen to at least 29 with hundreds wounded, authorities said. The explosions appeared to be the latest in a series of attacks that have stunned Lebanon and stoked sectarian strife in the small but strategically situated Middle East nation, which endured a ruinous 15-year civil war that ended in 1990.  Tripoli has seen numerous outbreaks of violence since civil war ignited in neighboring Syria two years ago. Gun battles between supporters and opponents of Syrian President Bashar Assad in the coastal city have cost dozens of lives.
WORLD
August 23, 2013 | By Patrick J. McDonnell
BEIRUT -- A pair of apparent car bombs exploded outside two mosques in the northern Lebanese city of Tripoli on Friday, killing at least a dozen people and injuring scores, authorities said. Local news accounts said the death toll was at least 27, with more than 300 wounded, and blamed the attacks on car bombs detonated on a day when worshipers gathered at the mosques for Friday prayers. Video from the scenes showed cars ablaze and people running through the streets in panic.
OPINION
July 25, 2013 | By Timothy Garton Ash
Some 6,000 refugees pour out of Syria every day, straining humanitarian aid resources and destabilizing the country's neighbors. Cumulatively, they already make up 10% of the population of Jordan. And there is no end in sight. Antonio Guterres, the U.N. high commissioner for refugees, says the displacement of people has not risen "at such a frightening rate" since the Rwandan genocide of 1994. The absolute size of the humanitarian catastrophe may not yet match the largest of recent times, such as the 2010 floods in Pakistan, but Syria is working hard to catch up. Moreover, its political effects are potentially far greater than those of any tsunami or earthquake.
WORLD
October 8, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Rioters attacked police and burned Shiite Muslim mosques in several Pakistani cities, demanding revenge a day after a hard-line Sunni Muslim politician was gunned down in the capital, Islamabad. Three bodyguards and a driver also were killed in the assassination of parliament member Maulana Azam Tariq, onetime leader of Sipah-e-Sahaba, a banned extremist group known for attacks on Shiites. At least one person was killed in the riots.
NEWS
May 20, 2001 | From Associated Press
Riots stretched into a second day Saturday over the killing of a Sunni Muslim leader, with protesters burning cars, smashing billboards and blocking roads in Karachi, Pakistan's largest city and main commercial hub. In the eastern city of Lahore, police used tear gas and steel-tipped batons to disperse about 300 of the slain leader's supporters, who threw stones and burned furniture to block roads near Data Darbar, a shrine for a Muslim saint.
WORLD
June 24, 2013 | By Jeffrey Fleishman
CAIRO -- The bloodied bodies of four men were dragged over a village road in what one witness described as a public lynching. The victims - Shiite Muslims - were attacked and killed Sunday in a rampage reportedly led by radical Sunni Muslim preachers. Shiites comprise a fraction of Egypt's predominately Sunni population, but the clerics had stoked sectarian mistrust in the poor village of Zawyat Abu Musalam. "For three weeks the Salafist sheikhs in the village have been attacking the Shiites and accusing them of being infidels and spreading debauchery," Hazem Barakat, a witness who videotaped the incident, told the Egyptian media.
WORLD
June 12, 2013 | By Patrick J. McDonnell
BEIRUT -- Syrian rebels burned homes and killed civilians in a sectarian rampage targeting Shiite Muslims in a village in eastern Syria, activists and officials said Wednesday.  The rebel attack on Hatla, in eastern Deir Elzur province, resulted in the deaths of unspecified numbers of civilians and combatants, the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said. The British-based monitoring group says it documents abuses by all sides in the Syrian civil war. The official Syrian government press office said “terrorists” attacked Hatla and killed 30 people, including women and children.
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