Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSunnis
IN THE NEWS

Sunnis

FEATURED ARTICLES
WORLD
April 27, 2013 | By Ned Parker, Los Angeles Times
BAGHDAD - Four Iraqi soldiers were shot dead Saturday, the day after Sunni Arab tribes in the restive western province of Anbar announced that they had formed their own army to defend themselves against the Shiite-dominated Iraqi government. The deadly attack came as Sunni gunmen around Iraq clashed with government forces in the aftermath of a government crackdown on Sunni demonstrators Tuesday in northern Iraq. More than 200 people died last week in fighting between Sunnis and Iraqi security forces.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2014 | By Yvonne Villarreal
The sun will come out tomorrow and then some for Charlie Day, Glenn Howerton and Rob McElhenney. As part of a new three-year overall deal between FX Productions and the trio's RCG Productions, the threesome's offbeat comedy "It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia" is being renewed for two more seasons on FXX, and their new comedy starring "SNL"/"30 Rock" alum Tracy Morgan received a straight to series order. The additional two seasons of "It's Always Sunny" will take the comedy to its 12th season, with each cycle consisting of 12 episodes.
Advertisement
OPINION
August 24, 2005
Re "Sunnis Call for Delay in Charter," Aug. 22 American voters should take heed of the message that goes with abstaining from voting, as the Sunnis did in Iraq. The Sunnis didn't go to the polls and now have an uphill battle for representation. With our low voter turnout and the silly excuses that "my vote won't make a difference" or "they're all crooks anyhow," neither of which is true, we place ourselves in the same position as the Sunnis at each of our elections. The difference is mainly that we can't be identified as a bloc of voters as easily as the Sunnis.
SCIENCE
March 12, 2014 | Monte Morin
Ever feel the rainy-day blues on a bright and sunny afternoon? If so, your Facebook account may be to blame, according to new research. In a paper published Wednesday in the journal PLOS ONE, scientists argued that the hugely popular social networking site exerts an emotional "spillover" effect that may carry significant consequences for an increasingly interconnected world. By analyzing more than a billion Facebook status updates, authors concluded that emotionally positive posts gave rise to more positive posts by friends, while negative posts spawned more negative posts.
WORLD
November 1, 2010 | By Meris Lutz, Los Angeles Times
Bahrain's opposition movement was dealt a blow Sunday when results from a second-round election held over the weekend showed that pro-government and Sunni Islamist lawmakers had retained their majority in the country's only elected legislative body. The largely Shiite Muslim opposition had hoped to gain at least a tie in the lower house of parliament, opening the door to government investigations of alleged corruption and the extent of the Sunni ruling family's properties, according to local news reports.
WORLD
May 10, 2013 | By Ned Parker, Los Angeles Times
BAGHDAD - Less than a year and a half after the last U.S. troops left, Iraq's political leaders are openly debating the prospect of two dangerous paths for their country: de facto division or civil war. Perhaps both. Tension between the Shiite majority, now in control of the levers of power, and the Sunni Arab minority, which dominated under Saddam Hussein, has been building for months. But politicians on all sides agree that the country has entered a perilous new phase, highlighted in late April by an attack on a Sunni protest camp by security forces that killed at least 45 people.
WORLD
July 8, 2010 | By Ned Parker and Nadeem Hamid, Los Angeles Times
A suicide bomber attacked a crowd of Shiite Muslim pilgrims in a Sunni neighborhood of Baghdad on Wednesday night, killing at least 33 people and wounding 108, according to police. The attack on the eve of the anniversary of the death of Imam Musa Kadhim, a Shiite saint, came as the country's political parties continued to bicker over the shape of the next government four months after national elections. The violence suggested that despite several setbacks to Al Qaeda in Iraq in recent months, militant groups are still capable of bloody and devastating attacks.
WORLD
April 15, 2011 | By Neela Banerjee, Los Angeles Times
When thousands of protesters spilled into Bahrain's streets in February, Dr. Mohammed Al-Muharraqi, a self-professed pessimist, thought his country might change for the better. Though most of the demonstrators gathering in the capital's Pearl Square roundabout were Shiite Muslims and he is a Sunni Muslim, Muharraqi was excited to hear them voice hopes he'd long shared. "When it started, we found it really, really cool," Muharraqi said. "They wanted a more equal distribution of wealth, less unemployment, more parliamentary power.
WORLD
April 25, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
Gunmen reportedly overtook a town north of Baghdad as battles continued to rage Thursday between Iraqi government forces and Sunni fighters. The violence began Tuesday after security forces stormed a Sunni Muslim protest encampment in Hawija, spurring clashes and revenge attacks that spread throughout Sunni areas. More than 100 people have reportedly lost their lives over the past three days. Protests had simmered for months ahead of the Hawija clashes, as Sunni demonstrators charged that they had been marginalized and mistreated by the Shiite Muslim-dominated government.
OPINION
September 18, 2007
Re "Reconciliation needed -- in D.C.," Opinion, Sept. 12 Ronald Brownstein's article asking how can we expect political reconciliation between the Sunnis and the Shiites in Iraq if we don't have it between Democrats and Republicans in Washington overlooks a key point: Reconciliation does not mean agreeing with each other, it means talking with each other toward a common goal. We have peaceful, albeit sometimes acrimonious, talking in our capital; we have violence and wanton murder in Iraq.
SPORTS
March 3, 2014 | Bill Dwyre
Lindsay Davenport has been elected to the International Tennis Hall of Fame. Knowing her, when word got out, she probably asked for a recount, just to make sure she hadn't bumped out somebody else more deserving. She is 37 now, lives in Orange County, is married to Jon Leach of the famed USC tennis family of dad and coach Dick Leach and longtime pro doubles star Rick Leach, Jon's brother. Jon was a USC All-American and is now an investment banker. Davenport had her fourth child in January and was notified of her Hall of Fame selection as she was about to give birth.
SPORTS
February 3, 2014 | By David Wharton
SOCHI, Russia - The sun shines brightly as a gentle breeze rustles palm trees along the shore. The forecast calls for a mostly clear sky with mild temperatures through the week. Welcome to the Winter Olympics. The 2014 Sochi Games will take place 1,000 miles south of Moscow, at a Black Sea resort that qualifies as one of only a few Russian cities with a subtropical climate. If that seems less than hibernal, the organizers insist they can stage a successful competition no matter what kind of weather there is over the next month.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2014 | By Meredith Blake
She's already been on Fallon, Leno, Letterman and Colbert, and now First Lady Michelle Obama will make an appearance in the Puppy Bowl, Animal Planet's consistently adorable and increasingly popular counter-programming to the Super Bowl.  The network announced this week that Obama hosted a "training camp" at the White House, attended by first dogs Bo and Sunny, 12 first- and second-graders from D.C.'s Harriet Tubman Elementary School and 13...
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2014 | By Meg James and Richard Verrier
The project took five months of planning, 11 days to film and a specially rigged SUV to conceal six puppeteers. A crew of 100 people shot some scenes in Malibu, Pico Canyon, Stevenson Ranch, Playa del Rey and Universal City. This wasn't for a movie or television episode, but a Muppet commercial for Toyota that will air during the Super Bowl on Sunday. The 60-second "Joyride" advertisement - created by Saatchi & Saatchi LA for Toyota Motor Sales U.S.A. Inc. of Torrance - promotes the launch of the 2014 Toyota Highlander and the upcoming Disney movie "Muppets Most Wanted.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 2014 | Julie Cart
Five years after the Obama administration's renewable energy initiative touched off a building boom of large-scale solar power plants across the desert Southwest, the pace of development has slowed to a crawl, with a number of companies going out of business and major projects canceled for lack of financing. Of the 365 federal solar applications since 2009, just 20 plants are on track to be built. Only three large-scale solar facilities have gone online, two in California and one in Nevada.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 2014 | By Ari Bloomekatz
Temperatures are likely to remain above normal through this weekend as sunny skies are expected across Los Angeles County. The normal high temperature in downtown L.A. for this time of year is 68 degrees, said David Sweet of the National Weather Service in Oxnard. The forecast calls for the high in downtown L.A. Saturday to exceed 70 degrees and reach 74 on Sunday. The low will be around 50 degrees both days, Sweet said. "Going to be sunny right on through Sunday," Sweet said.
OPINION
February 20, 2004
The Times' Feb. 15 editorial "High-Wire Act in Iraq" sounded like a scolding parent chastising three errant children with three "shoulds" and a "must." But these aren't kids. Asking the Kurds, the Sunnis and the Shiites "Why can't you all just get along?" is an exercise in futility. They were a nation only because they had been literally hammered together, first by the British, and then kept that way by a brutal dictator. Better than three presidents of one forced union of warring factions might be a recognition that these people want to be separate.
OPINION
May 4, 2006
Re "Biden Offers Alternative Plan for Iraq," May 2 The plan of Sen. Joseph Biden Jr. (D-Del.) to divide Iraq into three separate countries is an excellent idea, but how does he expect to get the Kurds, Sunnis and Shiites to agree on the borders? It could take 200 years of haggling. My solution: Let Rep. Tom DeLay (R-Texas) gerrymander the place. JOHN BLUMENTHAL Westlake Village There is no basis, historically, for the preservation of Iraq. The only logical solution would be for it to be broken up into three separate entities.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
The Times asked its reporters and critics to highlight figures in entertainment and the arts who will be making news in 2014. Here's who they picked: Khatia Buniatishvili | Pianist The sultry young Georgian pianist Khatia Buniatishvili sneaked into Los Angeles under the radar last February for an underpublicized recital debut at Cal State L.A.'s Luckman Theatre. But her Los Angeles Philharmonic debut in January will not be so stealthy. Buniatishvili will be playing Chopin's Second Piano Concerto with another young Eastern European - Polish conductor and Indianapolis Symphony Music Director Krzysztof Urbanski, who made an impressive Hollywood Bowl debut last year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 2013 | By Ari Bloomekatz
It's how Los Angeles does Christmas: Sunny and warm. Forecasters said temperatures in downtown L.A. this week will be well above the normal 68 degrees for December and will reach into the mid-70s. "It's going to be a great week," said meteorologist Stuart Seto of the National Weather Service in Oxnard. "If you want snow, it's not going to be a good week. " Throughout the week, Seto said overnight lows will be relatively warm at about 50 degrees and there's no forecast of rain - or snow.  In Long Beach, Christmas Day will see a high of 76 degrees.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|