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HEALTH
April 30, 2001 | By Denise Hamilton
With warm weather on the horizon and an ever-proliferating number of sunscreens on the market, Health decided it was time to find out more about protection from the sun. We consulted Dr. Robert Greenberg, a nationally known dermatologist in private practice in Vernon, Conn., who serves on the board of directors of the American Academy of Dermatology and is an assistant clinical professor of dermatology at the University of Connecticut Health Center. Question: The first thing we'd better emphasize is that sunscreen isn't just for summer.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2013 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Hugh Jackman could use some Wolverine-like regeneration right about now: The "X-Men" actor revealed Thursday that he'd had skin cancer removed from his nose. Jackman posted a photo of himself with a biggish nose bandage on Instagram with a warning to his fans. " Deb said to get the mark on my nose checked. Boy, was she right! I had a [basal] cell carcinoma," he wrote in the photo caption.  "Please don't be foolish like me. Get yourself checked.
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NEWS
May 25, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Does your sunscreen have what it takes to protect against the sun's damaging ultraviolet rays? Consumer Reports sized up 22 creams, sprays and lotions - just in time for beach-goers to start stocking up for summer. The sunscreens were put into three categories (SPF 30, SPF 40-50, and SPF 50+). The report also noted cost per ounce and what form the sunscreen came in. The products were ranked according to how effectively they guarded against UVB rays - rays that cause sunburn - and UVA rays, which go deeper into the skin and cause tanning and aging.
SCIENCE
September 4, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Has your doctor ever advised you to use sunscreen? Chances are, the answer is no. In fact, out of 18.3 billion doctor visits over nearly 21 years, sunscreen was recommended to patients only 12.83 million times, a new study finds. That works out to only 0.07% of visits. OK, you're thinking, surely doctors did a better job when they were seeing patients for a skin-related disease like melanoma or actinic keratosis . And indeed, they were 12 times more likely to mention sunscreen to these patients.
NEWS
January 23, 2012 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Sunscreens should be used regularly by people of all ages to prevent skin cancer, including the most dangerous form of cancer linked to sunburns: melanoma. However, a new study shows that kids are really bad about using sunscreen consistently. Researchers studied fifth-grade children in Massachusetts in 2004 and then re-surveyed the same 360 children three years later. In the first survey, more than half of the kids said they had experienced at least one sunburn, and this rate did not change three years later.
HEALTH
June 7, 2010 | By Julie Deardorff, Chicago Tribune
HOW TO USE IT — Use enough sunscreen to fill a shot glass, advises the American Academy of Dermatology, though larger people should adjust accordingly. Most people apply a quarter to half of the recommended amount of sunscreen, which lowers the advertised SPF factor. — Spread it on liberally 15 to 30 minutes before going outside and reapply every two hours or after swimming, sweating or towel drying. — Get some vitamin D. The body needs sunlight to make this vital chemical.
SCIENCE
September 4, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Has your doctor ever advised you to use sunscreen? Chances are, the answer is no. In fact, out of 18.3 billion doctor visits over nearly 21 years, sunscreen was recommended to patients only 12.83 million times, a new study finds. That works out to only 0.07% of visits. OK, you're thinking, surely doctors did a better job when they were seeing patients for a skin-related disease like melanoma or actinic keratosis . And indeed, they were 12 times more likely to mention sunscreen to these patients.
NEWS
April 11, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
See those lobster-colored hands? Those belong to me. But right now I wish they belonged to someone else. I'm usually a fanatic about applying sunscreen, but this past Sunday my brain went on hold as I meticulously spread the stuff on my face, shoulders, neck, lower arms and ears--places that I knew would be exposed as I walked around the Rose Bowl flea market. For some reason it didn't occur to me to put the sunscreen on the tops of my hands. It still didn't occur to me as I pushed a cart for about four hours.
IMAGE
July 24, 2011 | By Alexandra Drosu, Special to the Los Angeles Times
As summer heats up, we've learned to slather SPF 15 or higher all over our bodies and faces in an effort to prevent sun damage and skin cancer. We've also been told to recite our ABCs when checking for unusual moles: asymmetry, border irregularity and uneven color. Unfortunately, our scalps are often neglected. Sunscreen is transparent on skin, but who wants to go to work with greasy roots? How many people wear a hat during their lunch break? And who can see a mole on top of her own head?
HEALTH
June 1, 2009 | By Chris Woolston, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Have you ever slathered on sunscreen but somehow managed to miss your nose? Or the back of your hand? Or the tops of your feet? You're not the only one. According to the American Academy of Dermatology, most people apply less than half of the optimal amount of sunscreen, a habit that adds up to a lot of burned patches and uncomfortable rides home from the beach. If you don't completely trust your sunscreen skills, you might be interested in Heliocare, a supplement that promises sun protection in a pill.
SCIENCE
July 10, 2013 | By Stacey Leasca
Splashing in the surf and soaking up rays are just a part of life in the summertime: We take an average of 2 billion trips to the beach every year in America. While most of those trips end with the kids packing up seashells (and tons of sand) to take home, some end in tragedy. An average of 10 people a day die of unintentional drowning, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention . Drowning ranks fifth among the leading causes of unintentional death in the United States, with children ages 1 to 4 at the greatest risk.
NEWS
June 21, 2013 | By Alene Dawson
Summer officially starts on Friday and no matter how old you are, the season still beckons your inner kid with play, adventure and freedom . Just don't let grown-up, self-conscious worries zap the fun. Swimmer, 12-time Olympic medalist and California girl Natalie Coughlin shares tips on how to shake off hot-weather beauty fears and dive deep into summer with confidence.  Use sunscreen no matter what Coughlin is grounded, warm and engaging -- a bronzy, blue-eyed beauty who is as lithe as she is fit with a cascade of light-brown highlighted hair and nary a sunspot to be seen.
HEALTH
June 8, 2013 | By Karen Ravn
So, there you are in the sunscreen aisle, where the number of products on the shelves is approximately equal to the number of grains of sand on a beach. How to choose? Read the labels. Your decision may still not be easy, but new labeling regulations should help. "The new regulations will make a significant difference," says Latanya Benjamin, a dermatologist at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford University. "They standardize the basics of what to look for in a sunscreen.
NEWS
June 3, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
As if reducing the threat of skin cancer was not enough, scientists report that they have shown using sunscreen daily can slow the signs of aging skin -- even into middle age. Skin ages as people age, obviously. The sun is a major culprit in the skin's deterioration. Signs include wrinkles, of course, but also deterioration in texture and an increase in visible blood vessels. Scientists from Queensland Institute of Medical Research and other institutions divided 903 Australians 55 years old and younger into groups who used sunscreen with an SPF of at least 15 daily -- on face, neck, arms and hands -- and those who did so at their own discretion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2013 | By Joseph Serna
Southern Californians will get a sneak preview of summer this weekend when temperatures climb to 10 degrees warmer than normal for the time of year, forecasters said. “You have very nice weather in store for today and the weekend,” said National Weather Service meteorologist John Dumas. Temperatures are expected to be in the mid-80s Friday through Sunday, with clear skies in downtown Los Angeles, Dumas said. The weather will cool slightly to the upper 70s and then eventually into the mid-70s by early next week, he said.
IMAGE
September 23, 2012 | By Alexandra Drosu
Every few months a new beauty trend, treatment or potion is revealed - the latest skin-tightening laser, an age-defying ingredient or a longer-lasting filler. But should a fresh-faced 20-year-old be using retinol creams? And when is the right time to consider Botox? In the day of instant gratification, where do we draw the line between too soon and too late? We asked some experts for advice. The 20s In your 20s, wearing sunblock is the most important step you can take to prevent sun damage that leads to fine lines and wrinkles, says Dr. Simon Ourian, a dermatologist and founder of Epione Beverly Hills.
IMAGE
June 27, 2010 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
The amount of clothing many of us wear in summer is, understandably, inverse to the temperature. Matters of decency aside, that might not be a problem if we wore enough sunscreen, but most Americans don't. Just 18% of adults in the United States slather up before they go outdoors, according to a U.S. sunscreen study conducted by Neutrogena this year, and just 48% of Americans who slather up reapply sunscreen when they are exercising or swimming outside, even though many dermatologists recommend reapplication every two hours.
IMAGE
March 14, 2010 | By Alene Dawson, Special to the Los Angeles Times
When Lindsey Vonn finished her gold-medal-winning ski run during the Vancouver Olympics, she not only looked like a winner — she looked ready for her close-up. Setting aside her achievement on the slopes, how does a woman come through that kind of physical workout looking downright gorgeous? Somehow many female Olympic athletes seem able to look terrific during the most physically challenging workouts of their lives, muscling through pain, trying to conquer stress and battle nerves.
OPINION
August 31, 2012 | By Frances Z. Brown
This week, more than 60,000 souls will flock to the annual participatory-art festival of Burning Man. For first-time Burners, the weeklong "celebration of radical self-expression," which erects a weird, transient city in the Nevada desert, raises a host of issues. What to wear? What heat-resistant foodstuffs to pack? How do I find the giant three-dimensional Tetris blocks where my friends are camped? If the man registering me goes by Awesome Sauce and dresses as a bumblebee, do I really want to hang?
IMAGE
July 15, 2012 | By Kavita Daswani
Given their pedigree as a beauty staple for South Korean actresses, it may seem odd that BB creams would find their way into American beauty boutiques. But the products - originally known as Blemish Balm - are among the hottest new additions to the U.S. beauty scene, with a growing number of both small and internationally known brands clamoring to launch them. BB creams were formulated as skin lightening products and initially exploded in South Korea and Japan before spreading to China and other Southeast Asian countries - cultures where whiter skin is especially prized.
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