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July 12, 1994 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The former owner of now-bankrupt Sunset Motors, once the leading West Coast dealer of recreational vehicles, pleaded guilty Monday to bilking $2.8 million from three community banks. William P. Whitledge Jr., whose $50-million network of RV sales stretched to Seattle and included such celebrity customers as actor Tom Cruise, admitted that he used RVs as collateral for loans when the RVs already backed other loans and when he didn't own them or sell them.
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BUSINESS
July 12, 1994 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The former owner of now-bankrupt Sunset Motors, once the leading West Coast dealer of recreational vehicles, pleaded guilty Monday to bilking $2.8 million from three community banks. William P. Whitledge Jr., whose $50-million network of RV sales stretched to Seattle and included such celebrity customers as actor Tom Cruise, admitted that he used RVs as collateral for loans when the RVs already backed other loans and when he didn't own them or sell them.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 1992 | DEBRA CANO
City officials have wrapped up a deal to bring the city's first recreational vehicle dealership to town, a move that is expected to pour $300,000 in annual sales-tax revenues into the municipal treasury. "This deal has the potential to take care of the money the state took from us," City Manager Ray Kromer said. Kromer said the city is expected to lose about $400,000 in state revenues from its general fund, money used to pay for services such as public safety.
BUSINESS
December 15, 1992 | DEBRA CANO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Actor Tom Cruise owns one. Baseball players Rod Carew and Bert Blyleven have also bought them. Luxury motor homes with marble floors, microwave ovens, built-in bars, ice makers and coffee makers, oak cabinets, leather sofas, wallpapered bathrooms and satellite dishes are like castles on wheels--for those who can afford them.
BUSINESS
December 15, 1992 | DEBRA CANO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Actor Tom Cruise owns one. Baseball players Rod Carew and Bert Blyleven have also bought them. Luxury motor homes with marble floors, microwave ovens, built-in bars, ice makers and coffee makers, oak cabinets, leather sofas, wallpapered bathrooms and satellite dishes are like castles on wheels--for those who can afford them.
BUSINESS
July 12, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Ex-RV Dealer Pleads Guilty to Fraud: The former owner of now-bankrupt Sunset Motors, once the leading West Coast recreational vehicle dealership, pleaded guilty to bilking three community banks out of $2.8 million. William P. Whitledge Jr., whose $50-million network of RV sales stretched to Seattle, could face 30 years in prison and a $1-million fine for pledging the same RVs as collateral to get multiple loans from more than one bank. Whitledge also obtained liens against RVs he didn't own.
BUSINESS
August 12, 1993 | DEBRA CANO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Orange County's only dealer in several lines of Fleetwood recreational vehicles has parked at a new location in Fountain Valley. Mike Thompson's RV Super Stores opened July 29, relocating a 12-year-old operation from Irvine's Traveland U.S.A. to a four-acre site fronting the San Diego Freeway. The company, with headquarters in Santa Fe Springs, also has dealerships there and in Colton, both with freeway frontage.
BUSINESS
February 3, 1992 | JOHN LIPPMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Once, TV time was so costly that a spot buried in a Godzilla movie on a UHF station at 3 a.m. was all a local car dealer could afford. Now, thanks to the explosion in cable TV channels, Tony Buttacavoli of Fullerton Dodge is popping up at every click of the remote control. For $12,000 per month--his entire ad budget--Buttacavoli becomes an ubiquitous pitchman, with 30 commercials a week reaching 87,000 cable subscribers in Orange County.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 1992 | DEBRA CANO
City officials have wrapped up a deal to bring the city's first recreational vehicle dealership to town, a move that is expected to pour $300,000 in annual sales-tax revenues into the municipal treasury. "This deal has the potential to take care of the money the state took from us," City Manager Ray Kromer said. Kromer said the city is expected to lose about $400,000 in state revenues from its general fund, money used to pay for services such as public safety.
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