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Sunshine Canyon

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1999
Re "Sunshine Canyon Landfill Expansion," Letters to the Valley Edition, Feb. 28. Had [Larry] Naramore bothered to check, he would have seen that I supported [Richard] Alarcon's office as an active member of both the North Valley Coalition and LASER [Landfill Alternatives Save Environmental Resources], to close Lopez Canyon Landfill. I also testified at public meetings. I did this because I do not believe that any dump should be located close to residences. If it were not for Bradley Landfill closing within three years, I would be fighting to close that, if asked.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2012 | By Ann M. Simmons, Los Angeles Times
Dennis Montano stood on a corner in Granada Hills one recent brisk morning, lifted his nose to the sky and sniffed. "Right now, I don't smell anything," Montano said. That was good news for the embattled Sunshine Canyon Landfill. The disposal site operates roughly a mile away in Sylmar but has roiled the Granada Hills North neighborhood with a potpourri of foul smells. In the face of numerous complaints and dozens of public nuisance violations, the company has organized an "odor patrol team" in an effort to improve community relations and comply with state regulations.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1990
The Los Angeles City Council agreed Wednesday to allow dumping to continue until March 1 in the southern area of the controversial Sunshine Canyon Landfill. The council is currently permitting the landfill owner, Browning-Ferris Industries, to operate in the southern portion of the canyon on a month-to-month basis as long as BFI shows it is taking steps to move all of its dumping operations to the northern end of the dump by June 30, said Greig Smith, chief deputy to Councilman Hal Bernson.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 2008 | Amanda Covarrubias, Times Staff Writer
Adding another wrinkle to a decades-old controversy over a giant dump in the north San Fernando Valley, the state has approved a request by the operator of Sunshine Canyon Landfill to step in and oversee enforcement of waste laws at the facility until a city-county joint agency is approved. Sunshine Canyon is actually two landfills roughly a quarter of a mile apart, which puts them in different jurisdictions: one in the city of Los Angeles, the other in unincorporated county territory.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1999 | PATRICK McGREEVY
Opponents of the expansion of the Sunshine Canyon into Granada Hills will get a few more days to lobby the Los Angeles City Council, after the city attorney's office issued a ruling Monday that will likely require two more votes to enact the measure. City lawyers said the council's 9-5 vote last week to approve the expansion made so many changes in the zoning ordinance that a new first reading will be required today.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Los Angeles Board of Public Works voted Monday to recommend that the city renew its five-year contract to take most of its trash to the Sunshine Canyon Landfill above Granada Hills. The board picked Sunshine Canyon over landfills in the San Joaquin Valley and Riverside County. The City Council has until the end of February to make a decision on the contract.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
City garbage trucks would travel 1 million more miles each year under a plan approved Friday by the City Council. The city would divert some trash from Sunshine Canyon Landfill above Granada Hills to dumps in Riverside County and in Avenal, 200 miles north. The council has renewed a contract to take all the city's trash to Sunshine Canyon but has until next week to rescind that deal. If implemented, the policy approved Friday would cost the city an additional $11.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Continuing to dump city garbage at the Sunshine Canyon Landfill above Granada Hills is the cheapest option for Los Angeles, according to a new Sanitation bureau report. The report looked at three scenarios: dumping at Sunshine ($29 million annually), splitting trash between Sunshine and a Corona landfill (about $44 million) and splitting it between the Corona dump and one in the San Joaquin Valley ($59.2 million).
OPINION
March 21, 2006
Re "City to Pay More, but Dump Less," March 18 The L.A. mayor and the City Council backed out of a bargain on Sunshine Canyon supposedly in the name of the environment. What a farce! There may be plans for reducing the volume sent to landfills, but in the meantime the reality is that L.A. will pay more for its reduced use of Sunshine Canyon while burning more energy to ship trash to faraway places. The mayor talked of "balancing decisions." There is no balance. Sunshine Canyon is still open, and landfill operator BFI is probably reviewing its long list of potential customers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1989
The operator of Sunshine Canyon Landfill on Saturday rejected a compromise offer from a group of neighbors who have fought to close the dump near Granada Hills. At a meeting with members of North Valley Coalition, officials of Browning-Ferris Industries rejected the residents' proposal for limited expansion of the dump in exchange for the firm dropping its proposal to expand into an adjacent area of unincorporated Los Angeles County, said Mary Edwards, the coalition's secretary.
OPINION
February 7, 2007
Re "Break up the family," editorial, Feb. 5 BFI hired my lobbying firm about 14 years ago. Matt Knabe was still in college, and L.A. County Supervisor Don Knabe was the chief deputy to a supervisor. Don Knabe and his predecessor, Deane Dana, supported the Sunshine Canyon landfill before BFI ever retained me; Don Knabe has been consistent in that support. However, The Times' editorial makes it appear as if the only vote on Sunshine Canyon occurred in the past year. When Matt Knabe became a member of my firm, he was immediately sealed off from anything to do with supervisors' votes on Sunshine Canyon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Three months after the City Council voted to spend up to $5 million annually to divert some trash from Sunshine Canyon landfill beginning today, most of the city's trash will continue to go to the Granada Hills dump for at least a while longer. The city is in negotiations with two dumps outside Los Angeles to begin receiving some trash next year.
OPINION
June 13, 2006
WHO SAYS THE CITY AND COUNTY can't cooperate? The Los Angeles City Council and County Board of Supervisors have long worked hand in hand on the Sunshine Canyon Landfill, each heaping blame on the other for keeping the dump near Granada Hills alive. The landfill straddles the city limits, and when the city's part closed for a few decades, the county's side opened up and kept Sunshine Canyon in business. Now they're both open and operating.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 2006 | Jack Leonard, Times Staff Writer
Overruling an earlier decision by regional planning commissioners, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors voted 3 to 2 on Wednesday to approve a new operating permit for the controversial Sunshine Canyon Landfill while also calling for a possible end to dumping at the site after 30 years.
OPINION
March 21, 2006
Re "City to Pay More, but Dump Less," March 18 The L.A. mayor and the City Council backed out of a bargain on Sunshine Canyon supposedly in the name of the environment. What a farce! There may be plans for reducing the volume sent to landfills, but in the meantime the reality is that L.A. will pay more for its reduced use of Sunshine Canyon while burning more energy to ship trash to faraway places. The mayor talked of "balancing decisions." There is no balance. Sunshine Canyon is still open, and landfill operator BFI is probably reviewing its long list of potential customers.
OPINION
March 21, 2006
IN A STROKE OF POLITICAL GENIUS, the Los Angeles City Council on Friday voted to pay the operators of the Sunshine Canyon landfill several million dollars more for the privilege of sending them less of the city's garbage. Instead, the city will send it -- for more money still -- out of the county to two other dumps. This is a marvelous idea. The council can now apply this principle to other city contracts and services. The new runway at LAX, for example.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1992 | JOHN SCHWADA
A judge has refused to order Browning-Ferris Industries to pay $350,000 to cover the legal costs of a homeowner group that sued the company to block the expansion of a landfill in Sunshine Canyon. The North Valley Coalition of homeowners sought the money under a state law that allows litigants to win legal costs if they prevail in a lawsuit that is necessary to secure important rights of interest to the general public. In a ruling late Tuesday, Superior Court Judge Ronald M.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2000 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A judge dismissed a lawsuit by opponents of the expansion of Sunshine Canyon landfill Monday, rejecting claims that the Los Angeles City Council did not adequately consider all of the negative impacts of permitting the dump to grow into Granada Hills. Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Dzintra Janavs rebuffed the North Valley Coalition of Concerned Citizens, finding that the city's environmental impact report "properly focused on new information and/or changes in the landfill project."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2006 | Steve Hymon and Lynn Doan, Times Staff Writers
In a move that by business standards may sound peculiar, the Los Angeles City Council voted unanimously Friday to pay more money to send less trash to the long-controversial Sunshine Canyon Landfill above Granada Hills. Though the bulk of the city's trash still will be buried at Sunshine, about 600 tons of trash each day are expected to be trucked to other landfills in other cities. While agreements have yet to be reached, the trash is likely to go to Avenal, about 200 miles north of L.A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
City garbage trucks would travel 1 million more miles each year under a plan approved Friday by the City Council. The city would divert some trash from Sunshine Canyon Landfill above Granada Hills to dumps in Riverside County and in Avenal, 200 miles north. The council has renewed a contract to take all the city's trash to Sunshine Canyon but has until next week to rescind that deal. If implemented, the policy approved Friday would cost the city an additional $11.
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