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January 4, 1994 | Dean Takahashi, Times staff writer
Pow! Wham! Sunsoft Inc. is starting the new year with a bang. The video-game developer, a subsidiary of Japan's Sun Electronics Corp., said it signed a five-year contract with DC Comics to create Nintendo and Sega video games based on DC's popular super heroes. Sunsoft will develop video games for a variety of platforms based on well-known comic-book characters Batman, Superman, Flash, Aquaman, Wonder Woman and Green Arrow.
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BUSINESS
January 4, 1994 | Dean Takahashi, Times staff writer
Pow! Wham! Sunsoft Inc. is starting the new year with a bang. The video-game developer, a subsidiary of Japan's Sun Electronics Corp., said it signed a five-year contract with DC Comics to create Nintendo and Sega video games based on DC's popular super heroes. Sunsoft will develop video games for a variety of platforms based on well-known comic-book characters Batman, Superman, Flash, Aquaman, Wonder Woman and Green Arrow.
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BUSINESS
August 1, 1993 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eavesdrop on a conversation between David Siller and Rita Zimmerer, top executives at video game publisher SunSoft Inc., and it's easy to see that Orange County's game entrepreneurs are a zany lot. "Our hero, Aero the Acro-Bat, is something different; I call him Aero-dynamic," says Siller, product development manager. "He's a hero for the '90s, someone who rides flumes and goes bungee jumping." "I like to call him an acro- brat ," interjects Executive Vice President Zimmerer.
BUSINESS
August 1, 1993 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eavesdrop on a conversation between David Siller and Rita Zimmerer, top executives at video game publisher SunSoft Inc., and it's easy to see that Orange County's game entrepreneurs are a zany lot. "Our hero, Aero the Acro-Bat, is something different; I call him Aero-dynamic," says Siller, product development manager. "He's a hero for the '90s, someone who rides flumes and goes bungee jumping." "I like to call him an acro- brat ," interjects Executive Vice President Zimmerer.
BUSINESS
March 1, 1994 | Dean Takahashi,Times staff writer
Video Games: Davidson & Associates, an education software company in Torrance, has acquired two software developers, including video game developer Chaos Studios in Costa Mesa. Chaos Studios is known for developing titles such as "The Lost Vikings," "Rock and Roll Racing," and the upcoming "The Death and Return of Superman." The stock deal is valued at $6.75 million. Chaos, formerly known as Silicon & Synapse Inc., was founded in 1991 by Allen Adham, 27, and Michael Morhaime, 25.
BUSINESS
February 6, 1994 | DEAN TAKAHASHI
The success of companies like Virgin Interactive Entertainment and Interplay Productions Inc. has video game competitors scrambling to avoid being left behind. Sunsoft Inc. in Cypress, which expects sales of $80 million this year, has relied in the past on subcontractors to develop most of its Nintendo and Sega video games based on Warner Bros. cartoon characters. The company has waited for the CD-ROM market to grow before launching such games--and now the moment is at hand.
BUSINESS
April 1, 1998 | From Bloomberg News
Sun Microsystems Inc. and International Business Machines Corp. today will announce a Java operating system designed for network computers in a bid to define a standard that could help boost the fledgling NC market. The companies will collaborate on what they're calling Java OS for Business and will make it available to manufacturers at midyear, with products based on the software available next year.
BUSINESS
March 13, 1994 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Orange County millionaires go, Allen Adham and Michael Morhaime are mere youngsters. In another circle, the two entrepreneurs are elder statesmen. Adham, 27, and Morhaime, 26, sold their video game development company, Chaos Studios Inc., for $6.75 million two weeks ago. Chaos--now a subsidiary of Davidson & Associates, a Torrance-based educational software maker--has a crew of 19 "cool nerds" whose average age is 24 1/2 years. The mind-set at Chaos is just as young.
BUSINESS
August 1, 1993 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Video game publishing companies seem more like movie studios these days. They employ camera operators, producers, sound experts, artists and production crews. Creativity, glamour and adventure brew in every corporate cubicle. They tap the talents of computer cowboys--programmers, three-dimensional animators and well-paid joystick jockeys who "analyze" games in front of a screen all day.
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