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Sunthorn Kongsompong

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NEWS
February 26, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
Fifteen students were arrested as a crowd of 1,000 people defied martial law Monday to take part in the first major protest against the coup that toppled Thailand's elected government. Meanwhile, the deputy leader of the military junta that ousted Prime Minister Chatichai Choonhavan on Saturday said an interim government would be formed "not later than next week" and would exclude the military and politicians.
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NEWS
March 3, 1991 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This nation's military rulers Saturday named a former ambassador to the United States to serve as Thailand's interim civilian prime minister until elections are organized for a new Parliament. The prime minister designate is Anand Panyarachun, 58, a prominent Thai businessman who heads the Federation of Thai Industries. Before moving into the private sector he had a successful career as a diplomat and was permanent secretary of the foreign ministry after serving as the ambassador to Washington.
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NEWS
February 25, 1991 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thailand's new military rulers said Sunday that they plan elections within six months to replace the civilian government that was toppled in a bloodless coup. Bangkok and its environs remained calm, despite the presence of soldiers and police at key installations since the start of the coup at midday Saturday. There were no reports of resistance to the military.
NEWS
February 26, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
Fifteen students were arrested as a crowd of 1,000 people defied martial law Monday to take part in the first major protest against the coup that toppled Thailand's elected government. Meanwhile, the deputy leader of the military junta that ousted Prime Minister Chatichai Choonhavan on Saturday said an interim government would be formed "not later than next week" and would exclude the military and politicians.
NEWS
March 3, 1991 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This nation's military rulers Saturday named a former ambassador to the United States to serve as Thailand's interim civilian prime minister until elections are organized for a new Parliament. The prime minister designate is Anand Panyarachun, 58, a prominent Thai businessman who heads the Federation of Thai Industries. Before moving into the private sector he had a successful career as a diplomat and was permanent secretary of the foreign ministry after serving as the ambassador to Washington.
NEWS
February 24, 1991 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thailand's military Saturday ousted the country's civilian government, suspended the constitution and imposed martial law in a coup that could undermine one of Asia's fastest-growing economies. Prime Minister Chatichai Choonhavan, a former army general who was the nation's first elected prime minister in 12 years, reportedly was taken from a military plane at gunpoint as he was about to leave a Bangkok airfield on a flight to attend the swearing-in of his new deputy defense minister.
NEWS
August 4, 1999
Tony Diamond, 65, longtime USO performer and founder of BRAVO, a nonprofit group serving veterans. Born Frank Anthony Pacelli in Paterson, N.J., Diamond served in the Army during the Korean War, using his talents as a comedian to entertain soldiers. After the war, he adopted the stage name of Tony Diamond and performed on the comedy circuit and on Broadway.
NEWS
March 2, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
King Bhumibol Adulyadej approved an interim constitution Friday that gives the military junta sweeping powers to oversee the country prior to a return to civilian rule. The junta, which overthrew Premier Chatichai Choonhavan's elected government last Saturday, announced a provisional constitution that pledges to hold elections by the end of the year.
NEWS
April 6, 1992 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A coalition of Thai political parties Sunday named the country's supreme military commander as the next prime minister after a week of embarrassing revelations that their first candidate had been denied a U.S. visa because of allegations of involvement with the illegal drug trade. The selection of Gen. Suchinda Kraprayoon may prove equally controversial, since he is a leader of the military junta that overthrew the last elected government in February, 1991.
NEWS
April 6, 1992 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A coalition of Thai political parties Sunday named the country's supreme military commander as the next prime minister after a week of embarrassing revelations that their first candidate had been denied a U.S. visa because of allegations of involvement with the illegal drug trade. The selection of Gen. Suchinda Kraprayoon may prove equally controversial, since he is a leader of the military junta that overthrew the last elected government in February, 1991.
NEWS
February 25, 1991 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thailand's new military rulers said Sunday that they plan elections within six months to replace the civilian government that was toppled in a bloodless coup. Bangkok and its environs remained calm, despite the presence of soldiers and police at key installations since the start of the coup at midday Saturday. There were no reports of resistance to the military.
NEWS
February 24, 1991 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thailand's military Saturday ousted the country's civilian government, suspended the constitution and imposed martial law in a coup that could undermine one of Asia's fastest-growing economies. Prime Minister Chatichai Choonhavan, a former army general who was the nation's first elected prime minister in 12 years, reportedly was taken from a military plane at gunpoint as he was about to leave a Bangkok airfield on a flight to attend the swearing-in of his new deputy defense minister.
NEWS
March 10, 1991 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Deposed Prime Minister Chatichai Choonhavan was released from detention Saturday, two weeks after being overthrown in a bloodless military coup. The 71-year-old former prime minister, known for his trademark quip "no problem," appeared as jaunty as ever when he was shown on television having breakfast with the head of Thailand's military junta, Gen. Sunthorn Kongsompong, and the newly appointed civilian prime minister, Anand Panyarachun.
NEWS
July 16, 1991 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Is it merely a cheap shot at the leader of Thailand's ruling military junta or the opening fusillade of long-suppressed feminist outrage in a country better known for obsequious femininity? Gen. Sunthorn Kongsompong, the supreme commander of Thailand's armed forces, is undoubtedly accustomed to making front-page headlines, but a spate of recent articles has thrust him into a national debate for reasons unconnected with his powerful job. Gen.
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