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Super Bowl Xliii

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SPORTS
February 1, 2009 | Andrea Adelson
If there was ever one guy to root for, it would have to be Kurt Warner. That story of his is pretty incredible. Grocery bagger turned league MVP turned washed-up old guy turned potential Hall of Famer. What's that? You disagree? If there was ever one guy to root for, it would have to be Ben Roethlisberger, you say. That story of his is pretty incredible. Small-school quarterback turned Super Bowl winner turned reckless rebel turned indestructible leader. Both quarterbacks take their incredible stories into the Super Bowl on Sunday, and though both are worthy of cheers, you can only root for one. Who do you choose?
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
January 27, 2011 | Sam Farmer
You could never root for him? That's understandable. But if you think Pittsburgh's Ben Roethlisberger is anything less than an elite NFL quarterback, you're wrong. Roethlisberger might not have the gaudy statistics of New England's Tom Brady or Indianapolis' Peyton Manning ? and, in fact, some of his numbers are cover-your-eyes bad ? but there's no debating his most important statistic: He wins. Look at last Sunday's victory over the New York Jets in the AFC championship game.
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SPORTS
February 1, 2009 | Associated Press
For both the Arizona Cardinals and Pittsburgh Steelers, Sunday's Super Bowl is about the rush. For Arizona, it will be rushing the ball to give quarterback Kurt Warner time to find targets like Larry Fitzgerald and Anquan Boldin, the top members of the most dangerous receiving corps in football. For Pittsburgh, it is rushing Warner so he doesn't have time to throw accurately -- the Steelers were second in the NFL this season with 51 sacks. A look at the strategy that each team is likely to use in Sunday's Super Bowl.
SPORTS
January 23, 2011 | Sam Farmer
With temperatures predicted to dip into the single digits, tonight's AFC championship game between the New York Jets and Pittsburgh Steelers could go down as the coldest NFL playoff game in the illustrious football history of this city. It's fitting then that Santonio Holmes, the Steelers-turned-Jets receiver, is approaching this reunion with -- as opposed to a flicker of warmth -- the icy resolve of a mercenary. "I don't care about the Steelers right now," Holmes said in the week leading up to this showdown.
BUSINESS
September 12, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
NBC Universal, the television network that just broadcast the most-watched Olympic Games, said it had sold 85% of its commercial spots for Super Bowl XLIII and might sell the rest by year's end. NBC executive Seth Winter said the network had gotten as much as $3 million for a 30-second ad to be aired during Super Bowl XLIII, which will take place Feb. 1 in Tampa, Fla.
BUSINESS
November 26, 2008 | Associated Press
Most advertising slots for the 2009 Super Bowl that weren't sold in September still haven't moved, a change from earlier in the year when NBC announced the air time had been selling faster than usual. Super Bowl regulars such as FedEx Corp., Garmin Ltd., Salesgenie.com and General Motors Corp. are sitting out this year's football championship, to be held Feb. 1 in Tampa, Fla.
SPORTS
March 1, 2008 | Lonnie White, Times Staff Writer
After watching UCLA's men's basketball team fall short in back-to-back Final Four appearances over the last two years, don't be surprised to see Bruins supporters dancing in the streets after the latest numbers were released by oddsmakers for this year's NCAA championship. The Bruins' rise comes as a result of a shakeup at the top, with previously unbeaten Memphis losing at home to Tennessee, which followed that up with an upset loss of its own at Vanderbilt.
SPORTS
August 27, 2008 | Thomas Bonk, Times Staff Writer
Of course, we are all familiar with money-back guarantees on purchases of everything from clothing to appliances to Venetian blinds. But football games? That's what they're doing at Stanford, where buyers of certain season-ticket plans have the chance for a "Gridiron Guarantee" option. The premise: You say you didn't get the proper entertainment value at the end of the season. The pitch: You get the cost of your season tickets refunded. It's the brainchild of the Cardinal sports marketing department, which is trying to fill up the refurbished 55,500-seat Stanford Stadium.
SPORTS
January 21, 2009 | David Haugh
Every television set Ray Anderson passed Tuesday inside the NFL's league offices in New York was tuned to the same channel -- and it wasn't the NFL Network hyping the Pittsburgh Steelers and Arizona Cardinals in Super Bowl XLIII. It was all inauguration, all the time. Obama-vision indeed. What does the swearing-in of the 44th president have to do with the 43rd Super Bowl? "It's natural to link the inauguration with [Steelers Coach] Mike Tomlin becoming the third African American head coach in the Super Bowl because you see the spirit of change is real, change is here," Anderson, the NFL's vice president of football operations, said by phone.
SPORTS
February 1, 2009 | Sam Farmer
When tens of millions of worldwide viewers tune in today to Super Bowl XLIII, they will see two divergent clubs. The Pittsburgh Steelers want to make history. The Arizona Cardinals want to erase it. Arizona is a team tired of left-handed compliments. For too long, the Cardinals have heard they're the best thing produced by a bad franchise. Pittsburgh is a team looking for a left-handed complement. The Steelers want an NFL-record sixth Super Bowl ring to go with the five on their right hand.
SPORTS
February 2, 2009 | BILL PLASCHKE
It was Pittsburgh . . . no, it was Arizona . . . no, it was Pittsburgh . . . no, it was both of them, clutching each other in a dance of breathless, wonderful chaos. It was the Steelers' giant James Harrison rumbling 100 yards with an interception for the longest scoring play in Super Bowl history, then collapsing in the end zone in exhaustion.
SPORTS
February 1, 2009 | Sam Farmer
When tens of millions of worldwide viewers tune in today to Super Bowl XLIII, they will see two divergent clubs. The Pittsburgh Steelers want to make history. The Arizona Cardinals want to erase it. Arizona is a team tired of left-handed compliments. For too long, the Cardinals have heard they're the best thing produced by a bad franchise. Pittsburgh is a team looking for a left-handed complement. The Steelers want an NFL-record sixth Super Bowl ring to go with the five on their right hand.
SPORTS
February 1, 2009 | Associated Press
For both the Arizona Cardinals and Pittsburgh Steelers, Sunday's Super Bowl is about the rush. For Arizona, it will be rushing the ball to give quarterback Kurt Warner time to find targets like Larry Fitzgerald and Anquan Boldin, the top members of the most dangerous receiving corps in football. For Pittsburgh, it is rushing Warner so he doesn't have time to throw accurately -- the Steelers were second in the NFL this season with 51 sacks. A look at the strategy that each team is likely to use in Sunday's Super Bowl.
SPORTS
February 1, 2009 | Andrea Adelson
If there was ever one guy to root for, it would have to be Kurt Warner. That story of his is pretty incredible. Grocery bagger turned league MVP turned washed-up old guy turned potential Hall of Famer. What's that? You disagree? If there was ever one guy to root for, it would have to be Ben Roethlisberger, you say. That story of his is pretty incredible. Small-school quarterback turned Super Bowl winner turned reckless rebel turned indestructible leader. Both quarterbacks take their incredible stories into the Super Bowl on Sunday, and though both are worthy of cheers, you can only root for one. Who do you choose?
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2009 | Reed Johnson
And so it came to pass that a terrible hardship swept over the land, and heavy were the hearts of the people. First the money temples failed. Then the mighty house of Lehman fell silent. And double woe unto them who had followed the evil counsels of Darth Madoff, who was sometimes called Ponzi. Beholding all this, the people were sore afraid. Even the wise man Bernanke and his sorcerers feared that their magic rods were but twigs against a whirlwind.
SPORTS
February 1, 2009 | Sam Farmer
Ed Palladini has run a limousine company in Tampa for 27 years, accumulating a fleet of more than a dozen luxury cars, ranging from a basic Cadillac sedan to a plush Mercedes minibus that seats 14. Even now, during Super Bowl week, when Palladini's business should be booked solid, some of those beauties will not leave the lot. "I've got a car that hasn't moved in six months, but I've had to keep the insurance on it for the Super Bowl," he said.
SPORTS
January 23, 2011 | Sam Farmer
With temperatures predicted to dip into the single digits, tonight's AFC championship game between the New York Jets and Pittsburgh Steelers could go down as the coldest NFL playoff game in the illustrious football history of this city. It's fitting then that Santonio Holmes, the Steelers-turned-Jets receiver, is approaching this reunion with -- as opposed to a flicker of warmth -- the icy resolve of a mercenary. "I don't care about the Steelers right now," Holmes said in the week leading up to this showdown.
SPORTS
January 19, 2009 | Sam Farmer
The Arizona Cardinals didn't open their retractable roof Sunday. They shattered their glass ceiling. The long-held belief that "Cardinals" and "Super Bowl" will never occupy the same sentence is over, laid to rest by Arizona's 32-25 victory over the Philadelphia Eagles in the NFC championship game. This time, the punch line punched back. "We believe in ourselves, and we believe in each other, so really it doesn't matter what other people believe," Cardinals defensive end Bertrand Berry said.
SPORTS
January 30, 2009 | JOHN SCHEIBE
It's finally here. After weeks of gearing up and seemingly limitless promotion, Super Bowl XLIII hits on Sunday. And the Boss will be in charge, whether it's the pregame interview with President Obama or the halftime performance by Bruce Springsteen and his E Street Band. Oh, and there is the football game too. But as NBC Chairman Dick Ebersol reminded reporters this week during a conference call, "The Super Bowl is much more than a game," he said. Scheduled to kick off about 3:25 p.m.
SPORTS
January 25, 2009 | MICHAEL WILBON, Wilbon is a columnist for the Washington Post.
Usually it was on Saturdays when Larry Fitzgerald took his two boys to work with him. Fitz was (and still is) a sportswriter and radio talk show host in Minneapolis, so going to work meant to a North Stars skate or a Twins game or Vikings practice. Little Larry, who was about 8 at the time, and younger brother Marcus were ridiculously well behaved because Big Larry and Carol didn't tolerate any foolishness. But still they were curious, active little boys. So even though Big Larry would inevitably tell his sons, "Sit right there, watch practice, and don't move," he'd sometimes come back and find they were gone.
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