Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSuper Bowl Xx
IN THE NEWS

Super Bowl Xx

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
January 28, 1986
An estimated 5,066,100 viewers in the Los Angeles television market watched part or all of Sunday's Super Bowl game between the Chicago Bears and New England Patriots, according to the A. C. Nielsen Co. The game drew a Nielsen rating of 43.3 here, with a 76% share of the audience. That means that the game was being watched in 43.3% of the 4.4 million TV households in the L.A. market, and that 76% of the people watching television at the time were watching the Super Bowl.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
February 3, 2002 | DIANE PUCIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There is a small corner of the city jampacked with people who think the New England Patriots are going to win a Super Bowl at the Superdome. At the corner of Decatur and St. Peter's, right in the heart of the French Quarter, is The Corner Oyster Bar & Grill. In the window the sign says, "Danger Patriot Fans Partying." And they are. Brad Darr, a native of Memphis, Tenn., is the 32-year-old owner of The Corner and a passionate Patriot fan.
Advertisement
SPORTS
January 26, 1986 | DEREK RASER, Times Staff Writer
It was possibly the only time in Jeff Fisher's career as a punt-return specialist for the Chicago Bears that he left a football field untouched. "We had a press conference today," said Fisher from his New Orleans hotel Friday. "There were about 3,000 reporters. They had us all out on the field, lined up at tables by position. The quarterbacks were on the 50-yard line, the running backs were on the 40-yard line. . . . The media came over and started interviewing players.
SPORTS
January 27, 1997 | RANDY HARVEY
Although he has two small children, I knew it was OK to call my friend Ian in London late on Super Bowl Sunday night/Monday morning. An Oregonian living abroad for the last few years, he figured to be wide awake from the 11:15 p.m. kickoff to the 2:45 a.m. finish for his annual fix of the ultimate in Americana. Here's my question, I told him. I know what a lot of people in New England are doing--watching the game on television. What about Olde England? "Same thing," he said.
SPORTS
January 22, 1986 | RICH ROBERTS, Times Staff Writer
Remember the Rams' hurry-up offense at the end of the half in the NFC title game at Chicago two weeks ago--the one that almost got called for delay of game? Well, the Rams' old pal, Buddy Ryan, assures them that they didn't blow it, that it was his defense that did them in. "They had the right call," the Bears' defensive coordinator said Tuesday. "We knew what they were gonna do, like everybody's gonna do. They're gonna run double corners or double posts.
SPORTS
January 25, 1986
There have been many "dull" Super Bowl games in the past. Let's not judge this one before it's over. I have a feeling the football fans in Chicago and New England don't particularly care what either Mr. Murray or Mr. Ostler think about Super Bowl XX. Dull is reading about the Lakers blowing out their weak opposition in the Western Division by 20-30 points every game. That's dull. W. CASE Fullerton
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 1990 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Specials and Super Bowls Dominate SHOW NETWORK DATE AUDIENCE % 1. "MASH" (Final Episode) CBS Feb. 28, 1983 60.2 2. "Dallas" CBS Nov. 21, 1980 53.3 ("Who Shot J.R.?") 3. "Roots," Part VIII ABC Jan. 30, 1977 51.1 4. "Super Bowl XVI" CBS Jan. 24, 1982 49.1 5. "Super Bowl XVII" NBC Jan. 30, 1983 48.6 6. "Super Bowl XX" NBC Jan. 26, 1986 48.5 7. "Gone With The Wind," NBC Nov. 7, 1976 47.7 Part 1 8. "Gone With The Wind," NBC Nov. 8, 1976 47.4 Part 2 9. "Super Bowl XII" CBS Jan 15, 1978 47.2 10.
SPORTS
January 20, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
The Super Bowl-bound Chicago Bears took Sunday off before leaving for the New Orleans Superdome, a place that holds mixed memories for the NFC champions. The Bears, coming off three days of practice inside Memorial Stadium's bubble in Champaign, will leave for New Orleans today to prepare for the New England Patriots in Super Bowl XX. The game will mark the Bears' fourth at the Superdome, home of the New Orleans Saints. Two of the games were regular-season contests, one an exhibition.
SPORTS
January 20, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
The Super Bowl-bound Chicago Bears took Sunday off before leaving for the New Orleans Superdome, a place that holds mixed memories for the NFC champions. The Bears, coming off three days of practice inside Memorial Stadium's bubble in Champaign, will leave for New Orleans today to prepare for the New England Patriots in Super Bowl XX. The game will mark the Bears' fourth at the Superdome, home of the New Orleans Saints. Two of the games were regular-season contests, one an exhibition.
SPORTS
May 11, 1986 | United Press International
Chicago Bear cornerback Leslie Frazier, who suffered a major knee injury in the second quarter of Super Bowl XX, says he may return to action by the middle of next season. Frazier, who was injured during a punt return, underwent reconstructive knee surgery immediately after Chicago's Super Bowl victory. The Bears had said they did not expect Frazier back for the 1986 season. "Initially, they told me it would take eight to 10 months before I would be running," Frazier said.
SPORTS
January 31, 1993 | MIKE PENNER
The greatest comeback in Buffalo Bills history has nothing to do with Frank Reich, Warren Moon, Andre Reed or Jim (The Work Isn't Steady) Eddy, former defensive coordinator of the Houston Oilers.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 1990 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Specials and Super Bowls Dominate SHOW NETWORK DATE AUDIENCE % 1. "MASH" (Final Episode) CBS Feb. 28, 1983 60.2 2. "Dallas" CBS Nov. 21, 1980 53.3 ("Who Shot J.R.?") 3. "Roots," Part VIII ABC Jan. 30, 1977 51.1 4. "Super Bowl XVI" CBS Jan. 24, 1982 49.1 5. "Super Bowl XVII" NBC Jan. 30, 1983 48.6 6. "Super Bowl XX" NBC Jan. 26, 1986 48.5 7. "Gone With The Wind," NBC Nov. 7, 1976 47.7 Part 1 8. "Gone With The Wind," NBC Nov. 8, 1976 47.4 Part 2 9. "Super Bowl XII" CBS Jan 15, 1978 47.2 10.
SPORTS
January 26, 1990 | LARRY STEWART
Pat Summerall expects a high-scoring game with the 49ers winning. John Madden, although he says the 49ers may be the best team of all time, isn't making any predictions. "I look for the 49ers to win, 31-21, or something like that," Summerall said when CBS' Super Bowl announcers met with a few reporters to talk about Sunday's game. "It's going to be a high-scoring game. The 49er defense is underrated, but you've got to figure that John Elway is going to put some points on the board."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1988 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, Times Staff Writer
OK. Each of us has our favorite team, whether you're talkin' Big Bad Bears(Chicago) or Luv 'Ya Blue(Houston). But who's San Diego's favorite team? Well, why did San Diego want to have this Super Bowl game, anyway? You got it. Let's talk bucks. No matter "how you cut it," the Super Bowl represents an economic windfall to the city playing host to it, said Jim Steeg, head of special events for the National Football League. The game is scheduled for Sunday, Jan. 31, at San Diego Jack Murphy Stadium.
SPORTS
May 11, 1986 | United Press International
Chicago Bear cornerback Leslie Frazier, who suffered a major knee injury in the second quarter of Super Bowl XX, says he may return to action by the middle of next season. Frazier, who was injured during a punt return, underwent reconstructive knee surgery immediately after Chicago's Super Bowl victory. The Bears had said they did not expect Frazier back for the 1986 season. "Initially, they told me it would take eight to 10 months before I would be running," Frazier said.
SPORTS
January 29, 1986 | MIKE DOWNEY
This is the last straw. Now they have even filled a Super Bowl with dope dust. Now some of us no longer will look back upon the New England Patriots as a pack of grinning, winning wild cards. Instead we will picture them on their knees, nose down, trying to snort a Superdome hash mark. The poor public pays 75 bucks--or 10 times that--for a ticket to a football game, only to discover that much of the money goes directly from pockets to nostrils.
SPORTS
January 27, 1986 | SCOTT OSTLER
It seemed so clear two weeks ago. The vanilla New England Patriots, with no passing attack, a robot quarterback and a workmanlike but unflashy defense, didn't stand a chance against the Chicago Bears. The Bears were confident, tough, swaggering bullies and outlaws. The milquetoast Patriots didn't even have their own Super Bowl video, for cripes sake. So what happened? How did we all get talked into believing this would be a game?
SPORTS
January 13, 1986
In Super Bowl XX, Chicago's Jim McMahon and New England's Craig James will be opposing each other in a bowl for the first time since they lit up the scoreboard in the 1980 Holiday Bowl at San Diego. If they produce the same kind of fireworks in New Orleans, fans are in for a treat. In the Holiday Bowl, McMahon hit tight end Clay Brown with a 41-yard touchdown pass on the last play of the game to give Brigham Young a 46-45 victory over Southern Methodist.
SPORTS
January 28, 1986
An estimated 5,066,100 viewers in the Los Angeles television market watched part or all of Sunday's Super Bowl game between the Chicago Bears and New England Patriots, according to the A. C. Nielsen Co. The game drew a Nielsen rating of 43.3 here, with a 76% share of the audience. That means that the game was being watched in 43.3% of the 4.4 million TV households in the L.A. market, and that 76% of the people watching television at the time were watching the Super Bowl.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 1986 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Electrifying, wasn't it? I don't know about you, but for me, the highlight of NBC's marathon 6 1/2-hour Super Bowl Sunday was its coast-to-coast yak between The Lipper and The Gipper. They schmoozed football for eight minutes during a two-hour pregame show. And "NBC Nightly News" anchorman Tom Brokaw actually looked interested when President Reagan recalled the block he missed as an offensive lineman in his long-ago football days at Eureka College. Oh, no, Ronnie, not the football yarns . . .
Los Angeles Times Articles
|