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Super Bowl Xxxii

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 1999 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Armchair quarterbacks will be happy to learn professional football has entered the DVD era. Polygram's "The Best One Ever: Super Bowl XXXII" ($30) is the first DVD from a professional sports league. Thanks to multiple camera angles, football fans can choose how they want to relive the 1998 championship game between the Denver Broncos and the Green Bay Packers. Viewers also have the option to watch the terrific highlights with either the Bronco or Packer play-by-play radio broadcasts.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
January 26, 2003 | Helene Elliott, Times Staff Writer
He had been the franchise for 15 seasons and was something of a tragic figure after agonizing Super Bowl losses in 1987, 1988 and 1990. But John Elway found redemption Jan. 25, 1998 at Qualcomm Stadium. Elway, 37, didn't have to put on an aerial show and carry the burden of the Denver Broncos' history on his shoulders as they faced the Green Bay Packers. This time, he had a new dimension to his offense in running back Terrell Davis, who rushed for 157 yards and a Super Bowl-record three touchdowns in the Broncos' 31-24 victory in Super Bowl XXXII.
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NEWS
January 26, 1998 | SHAUN POWELL, NEWSDAY
Contrary to widespread belief, it's not the Denver Broncos who are confronted with the most difficult challenge Sunday. That belongs to yours truly, the expert, who must somehow convince you, the skeptic, why the Broncos will win Super Bowl XXXII. The only person in America with a trickier job of explaining away, at the moment, is White House spokesman Mike McCurry. As everyone knows, the Broncos traditionally don't play their best football in late January.
SPORTS
December 22, 2000 | MIKE PENNER
LAST-CHANCE GANG Seven teams begin the final week of the regular season angling for the three remaining playoff berths. Rating their prospects--or why the Steelers, at 8-7, have a better chance of sneaking in than the 9-6 Jets and the reigning Super Bowl champion Rams: MIAMI DOLPHINS Will qualify if: They win at New England. Why they find themselves in this predicament: Annual December swoon in full bloom.
NEWS
January 19, 1998 | MIKE DOWNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A woman I know works for public television. She called last week to ask: "Did you hear about the NFL?" Hear what? "CBS got the TV rights." I misunderstood. "PBS got the NFL? " "No, stupid," she said. "CBS." I did indeed feel stupid, as well as puzzled why someone from public television would call me "stupid," as opposed to, say, "intellectually inadequate." Apologizing, attributing my mistake to ears that are half what they used to be--not unlike Evander Holyfield's--I said, "The NFL on PBS.
SPORTS
January 22, 1998 | STEVE SPRINGER
The Broncos' Davis has been getting a lot of publicity over the fact that he is returning to his hometown to play Super Bowl XXXII. But his counterpart at running back on the Green Bay Packers, Dorsey Levens, doesn't envy Davis. "I would hate to play the Super Bowl in my own town with all the family and friends around," Levens said. "He can have it. I would hate that."
SPORTS
February 8, 1997
I have been a loyal San Diego Charger fan since 1970 and a season-ticket holder since 1985. I'm embarrassed to watch the town that I grew up in stand on the verge of losing Super Bowl XXXII and the Chargers to a very undeserving Los Angeles sports home. The average NFL fan in Los Angeles doesn't really understand the history of the lightning bolt and the importance of storied rivalries with the Oakland Raiders and Kansas City Chiefs. San Diego will end up being the laughingstock of the NFL world if it loses an opportunity to earn more than $300 million from the Super Bowl.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 1998 | LEE MARGULIES
Super ratings for the Super Bowl on Sunday sent NBC soaring in the seasonal standings against CBS, ABC and Fox, solidifying the network's bid to win the prime-time championship for the third year in a row. NBC said Super Bowl XXXII, in which the John Elway-led Denver Broncos beat the Green Bay Packers, 31-24, tied with Super Bowl XXVII as the third most-watched TV program in history, with an estimated 133.4 million viewers watching at least part of the football game.
SPORTS
August 18, 1998 | T.J. SIMERS
Late in Super Bowl XXXI with Green Bay thrashing New England, the editor back in Los Angeles wanted to know what Murray was going to write. Holding the phone to my ear. I gently asked Murray, sitting next to me, what his twist would be on the Super Bowl. "I'm thinking about the running backs," he said. "This Dorsey Levens guy left Notre Dame and went to Georgia Tech and Edgar Bennett."
SPORTS
January 27, 1998 | T.J. SIMERS
A review of Super Bowl XXXII, and hey, what's the big deal if Denver quarterback John Elway retires? It's not like Bubby Brister can't hand the ball off to Terrell Davis just as well as Elway. Davis, overlooked after graduating from high school and then falling to the sixth round in the NFL draft, became the seventh running back to be named the most valuable player in the Super Bowl after stomping the Packers, and will ride in style as he begins an extended victory lap.
SPORTS
January 31, 2000 | T.J. SIMERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was one yard, separating those who might enjoy glory from those lost eventually in historical anonymity, a Super Bowl slow to start, stirring in its finish, and in your face, Los Angeles. "It proves we did the right thing in going to St. Louis," Ram owner Georgia Frontiere after receiving the Lombardi Trophy from NFL Commissioner Paul Tagliabue.
SPORTS
May 2, 1999 | PAUL ATTNBER, SPORTING NEWS
For years, John Elway played quarterback with more bravado than intelligence. Impatient and daring--a risky combination at a position where calmness is a required attribute--he frequently made ill-fated decisions rooted in a desire to produce the spectacular rather than settle for the effectively mundane. If he had finished his career caught in this rut, we would remember him as the most entertaining rascal ever to masquerade as a quarterback.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 1999 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Armchair quarterbacks will be happy to learn professional football has entered the DVD era. Polygram's "The Best One Ever: Super Bowl XXXII" ($30) is the first DVD from a professional sports league. Thanks to multiple camera angles, football fans can choose how they want to relive the 1998 championship game between the Denver Broncos and the Green Bay Packers. Viewers also have the option to watch the terrific highlights with either the Bronco or Packer play-by-play radio broadcasts.
SPORTS
January 31, 1999 | HELENE ELLIOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Super Bowl is more than a game: It's an industry. But the economic benefits of hosting the NFL's showcase event--and the weeklong revelry that precedes it--can't be measured as precisely as the rushing yards Denver's Terrell Davis or Atlanta's Jamal Anderson will gain in Super Bowl XXXIII today at Pro Player Stadium.
SPORTS
August 18, 1998 | T.J. SIMERS
Late in Super Bowl XXXI with Green Bay thrashing New England, the editor back in Los Angeles wanted to know what Murray was going to write. Holding the phone to my ear. I gently asked Murray, sitting next to me, what his twist would be on the Super Bowl. "I'm thinking about the running backs," he said. "This Dorsey Levens guy left Notre Dame and went to Georgia Tech and Edgar Bennett."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 1998 | LEE MARGULIES
Super ratings for the Super Bowl on Sunday sent NBC soaring in the seasonal standings against CBS, ABC and Fox, solidifying the network's bid to win the prime-time championship for the third year in a row. NBC said Super Bowl XXXII, in which the John Elway-led Denver Broncos beat the Green Bay Packers, 31-24, tied with Super Bowl XXVII as the third most-watched TV program in history, with an estimated 133.4 million viewers watching at least part of the football game.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1998 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
NBC kicks off its Super Bowl Sunday coverage at 12:30 p.m. on Channel 4 with the "Super Bowl on NBC," a special hosted by Greg Gumbel and Ahmad Rashad, from Qualcomm Stadium in San Diego. "Super Bowl XXXII," which matches the defending NFL champion Green Bay Packers against the AFC champion Denver Broncos, follows at 3 p.m. Dick Enberg will call the game, assisted by color commentators Phil Simms and Paul Maguire. Jim Gray, John Dockery and Randy Cross will report from the sidelines.
NEWS
February 4, 1997 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If San Diego falters in its drive to expand its stadium, the NFL is ready to shift the 1998 Super Bowl to the Rose Bowl, NFL Commissioner Paul Tagliabue told civic boosters here Monday. "We are talking to the Rose Bowl on a contingency basis as we speak," Tagliabue said at a luncheon meeting of business and political leaders. "I hope this stays a contingency plan. We want to play the game here.
SPORTS
January 27, 1998 | T.J. SIMERS
A review of Super Bowl XXXII, and hey, what's the big deal if Denver quarterback John Elway retires? It's not like Bubby Brister can't hand the ball off to Terrell Davis just as well as Elway. Davis, overlooked after graduating from high school and then falling to the sixth round in the NFL draft, became the seventh running back to be named the most valuable player in the Super Bowl after stomping the Packers, and will ride in style as he begins an extended victory lap.
NEWS
January 26, 1998 | BOB GLAUBER, NEWSDAY
Shaun, Shaun, Shaun. Here you are, covering your first Super Bowl, and right away, you want to puff your chest and play the hero. Be different, just for the sake of being different, even though you know in your heart the Denver Broncos are about to surpass the Buffalo Bills and Minnesota Vikings in Super Bowl futility, and that John Elway is about to join Jim Kelly as the second four-time loser.
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