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Super Bowl Xxxvi

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 2002
Before Super Bowl XXXVI takes over your TV set Sunday, Steve Harvey reviews some of the more colorful broadcast fumbles and strange calls of the 2001 football season. (Don't worry--TV Times' play-review system is much faster than the NFL's.)
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
January 26, 2003 | Helene Elliott, Times Staff Writer
NFL Commissioner Pete Rozelle had many battles over the years with Al Davis, the Oakland Raider owner and managing general partner. But even Rozelle had to admire Davis' work after the AFC champion Raiders toyed with the NFC champion Minnesota Vikings, 32-14, and won Super Bowl XI. "I'm sorry the trophy isn't silver and black, but it's close," Rozelle said as he presented the silver Vince Lombardi Trophy to Davis at the Rose Bowl on Jan. 9, 1977....
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NEWS
February 10, 2002
Super Bowl statistics--The headings above the team portion of the Super Bowl XXXVI statistics were reversed in the Super Bowl section Monday. The St. Louis Rams' statistics were on the left, the New England Patriots' on the right.
SPORTS
September 1, 2002 | BOB OATES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Before we all sit down to a new football season, here's a take on the most recent NFL title game--a view that repairs the record, I'd say--varying, as this does, from the national perception: * The notion that the St. Louis Rams' offense was beaten by the New England Patriots' defense last winter in Super Bowl XXXVI is false. Although it was a 17-3 game for three quarters, it was 17-17 in the fourth.
SPORTS
February 4, 2002 | Diane Pucin
Coming from nowhere to somewhere, from Millbrook, Ala., and Lynchburg, Va., from odd jobs to community college to Houston, from Western Kentucky, where basketball was king, to being an NFL defensive coordinator, standing on the turf of the Superdome and looking up to see your teammates, your defenders, holding up the Super Bowl trophy, it can make men positively teary-eyed. Humility joined with hard work. That's what shaped Antowain Smith, New England Patriot running back, and Romeo Crennel, New England Patriot defensive coordinator.
SPORTS
September 1, 2002 | BOB OATES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Before we all sit down to a new football season, here's a take on the most recent NFL title game--a view that repairs the record, I'd say--varying, as this does, from the national perception: * The notion that the St. Louis Rams' offense was beaten by the New England Patriots' defense last winter in Super Bowl XXXVI is false. Although it was a 17-3 game for three quarters, it was 17-17 in the fourth.
SPORTS
February 3, 2002 | Bill Plaschke
The game is a mismatch, the town is a rascal, and the cops are everywhere. Everyone's talking about patriotism, but the team wearing red, white and blue will probably have the dawn's early light beaten out of it. Everyone's talking about security, but the probable winners were stolen from another city. Thus, the Super Bowl will stagger into our homes this afternoon, as it has done for 35 years, wearing a gaudy tie of excess knotted above a wrinkled shirt of expectation. But also with a pulse.
SPORTS
February 4, 2002
I don't want to hear anymore about the poor Red Sox, or The Curse of the Bambino. Please, no more whining from New Englanders about Billy Buckner or how long-suffering they are. They've got a team, a hero, a victory, and a championship to take to their graves now, an in-the-clutch, game-ending play to win the title of all titles, the Super Bowl.
SPORTS
February 3, 2002 | T.J. Simers
My Super Bowl Diary: Days 5 and 6 NEW ORLEANS--When I heard the mayor of Los Angeles was going to make the selfless sacrifice to fly here for Super Bowl 36 to meet Commissioner Paul Tagliabue and make a pitch for the return of football, I wanted to help. I called the mayor's office, the lady on the phone wanted to know who was calling, and when I told her, she immediately put me through--to Hilda Delgado. I made a promise to myself to start reading the front page of The Times instead of only the Sports section because I was embarrassed to say I had no idea Hilda had already replaced Jim Hahn as mayor of L.A. Hilda explained to me she worked in the press office, she doesn't read the Sports section unless it's baseball season and she's an Oakland A's fan. I'm not surprised City Hall ran out of Dodger fans to hire.
SPORTS
January 26, 2003 | Helene Elliott, Times Staff Writer
NFL Commissioner Pete Rozelle had many battles over the years with Al Davis, the Oakland Raider owner and managing general partner. But even Rozelle had to admire Davis' work after the AFC champion Raiders toyed with the NFC champion Minnesota Vikings, 32-14, and won Super Bowl XI. "I'm sorry the trophy isn't silver and black, but it's close," Rozelle said as he presented the silver Vince Lombardi Trophy to Davis at the Rose Bowl on Jan. 9, 1977....
NEWS
February 10, 2002
Super Bowl statistics--The headings above the team portion of the Super Bowl XXXVI statistics were reversed in the Super Bowl section Monday. The St. Louis Rams' statistics were on the left, the New England Patriots' on the right.
BUSINESS
February 4, 2002 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Anheuser-Busch Cos. draped one of its five commercials in red, white and blue in memory of the victims of the Sept. 11 attacks, but most advertisers that paid an average of $1.9 million for 30-second spots during Sunday's Super Bowl XXXVI broadcast stuck with tradition and went for laughs. Along the way, General Motors Corp. resurrected Led Zeppelin for Cadillac, H&R Block Inc. enlisted the Beatles, and Britney Spears time-warped her way through a jingle for Pepsi.
SPORTS
February 4, 2002 | T.J. Simers
My Super Bowl Diary: Day 7 NEW ORLEANS--Before we could make our way into the Superdome Sunday to hear Paul McCartney sing about "Freedom," we were told to arrive "at least four hours early and naked" for Super Bowl 36. That's no big deal for the people accustomed to spending time in this den of iniquity, of course, because you take a walk down Bourbon Street and you see women lifting their tops for a few beads. You see that happen two or three hundred times a day and you no longer take that much notice.
SPORTS
February 4, 2002 | Diane Pucin
Coming from nowhere to somewhere, from Millbrook, Ala., and Lynchburg, Va., from odd jobs to community college to Houston, from Western Kentucky, where basketball was king, to being an NFL defensive coordinator, standing on the turf of the Superdome and looking up to see your teammates, your defenders, holding up the Super Bowl trophy, it can make men positively teary-eyed. Humility joined with hard work. That's what shaped Antowain Smith, New England Patriot running back, and Romeo Crennel, New England Patriot defensive coordinator.
SPORTS
February 4, 2002
I don't want to hear anymore about the poor Red Sox, or The Curse of the Bambino. Please, no more whining from New Englanders about Billy Buckner or how long-suffering they are. They've got a team, a hero, a victory, and a championship to take to their graves now, an in-the-clutch, game-ending play to win the title of all titles, the Super Bowl.
SPORTS
February 3, 2002 | T.J. Simers
My Super Bowl Diary: Days 5 and 6 NEW ORLEANS--When I heard the mayor of Los Angeles was going to make the selfless sacrifice to fly here for Super Bowl 36 to meet Commissioner Paul Tagliabue and make a pitch for the return of football, I wanted to help. I called the mayor's office, the lady on the phone wanted to know who was calling, and when I told her, she immediately put me through--to Hilda Delgado. I made a promise to myself to start reading the front page of The Times instead of only the Sports section because I was embarrassed to say I had no idea Hilda had already replaced Jim Hahn as mayor of L.A. Hilda explained to me she worked in the press office, she doesn't read the Sports section unless it's baseball season and she's an Oakland A's fan. I'm not surprised City Hall ran out of Dodger fans to hire.
SPORTS
February 4, 2002 | T.J. Simers
My Super Bowl Diary: Day 7 NEW ORLEANS--Before we could make our way into the Superdome Sunday to hear Paul McCartney sing about "Freedom," we were told to arrive "at least four hours early and naked" for Super Bowl 36. That's no big deal for the people accustomed to spending time in this den of iniquity, of course, because you take a walk down Bourbon Street and you see women lifting their tops for a few beads. You see that happen two or three hundred times a day and you no longer take that much notice.
BUSINESS
February 4, 2002 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Anheuser-Busch Cos. draped one of its five commercials in red, white and blue in memory of the victims of the Sept. 11 attacks, but most advertisers that paid an average of $1.9 million for 30-second spots during Sunday's Super Bowl XXXVI broadcast stuck with tradition and went for laughs. Along the way, General Motors Corp. resurrected Led Zeppelin for Cadillac, H&R Block Inc. enlisted the Beatles, and Britney Spears time-warped her way through a jingle for Pepsi.
SPORTS
February 3, 2002 | Bill Plaschke
The game is a mismatch, the town is a rascal, and the cops are everywhere. Everyone's talking about patriotism, but the team wearing red, white and blue will probably have the dawn's early light beaten out of it. Everyone's talking about security, but the probable winners were stolen from another city. Thus, the Super Bowl will stagger into our homes this afternoon, as it has done for 35 years, wearing a gaudy tie of excess knotted above a wrinkled shirt of expectation. But also with a pulse.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 2002
Before Super Bowl XXXVI takes over your TV set Sunday, Steve Harvey reviews some of the more colorful broadcast fumbles and strange calls of the 2001 football season. (Don't worry--TV Times' play-review system is much faster than the NFL's.)
Los Angeles Times Articles
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