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Super Collider

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1991
Super collider equals super waste. Waste not, want not. JIM MOORE North Hollywood
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1999 | K.C. COLE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Ever since Ernest Lawrence built the first 11-inch cyclotron at Berkeley, the United States has taken the lead in building "atom smashers" to probe the recesses of inner space. Now miles in circumference, these mammoth machines accelerate subatomic particles to nearly the speed of light, then smash them together. The idea is to re-create the specks of the primordial soup that spawned particles during the big bang.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1992
By a vote of 232 to 181, the House voted to kill the Superconducting Super Collider project under development at Waxahachie, Tex. This removed $450 million from a fiscal 1993 appropriations bill (HR 5373), leaving $34 million for shutting down the project. The issue is now before the Senate. About $1 billion has been appropriated toward the estimated $8.3-billion final cost of the proposed 54-mile oval tunnel for breaking up atoms in high-speed collisions.
OPINION
September 29, 1996 | EDWARD WITTEN, Edward Witten is professor of physics at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, N.J
When the superconducting super collider particle accelerator project was canceled three years ago, many physicists worried that it might have a contagious effect on the science policies of other countries. In December 1994, however, a consortium of European countries, making up the European Center for Nuclear Research voted unanimously to approve construction of a European super collider, the Large Hadron Collider, to be built at the center laboratory near Geneva.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A report from the Energy Department shows that costs for the Superconducting Super Collider have jumped nearly 50% and construction time will be extended another year. In a report to lawmakers last week, the department estimated the cost at $8.2 billion, compared to an initial estimate of $5.3 billion, and predicted that the project will not be completed until the fall of 1999. The facility, to be built in the Dallas-Ft.
NEWS
November 18, 1987 | ROBERT GILLETTE, Times Staff Writer
Walt Davey, who farms 10,000 acres near Dixon, Calif., and wears a red-pepper emblem on his lapel--"When you think of V-8 juice, think of us"--may be one of the more unusual lobbyists plying the halls of Washington these days on behalf of high-energy physics. But in Davey's view, farming has at least one point in common with smashing atoms. "If you don't stay out on the cutting edge of technology," Davey says, "you're gone tomorrow."
NEWS
September 13, 1989
The House approved a compromise $18.6-billion spending bill that includes money to break ground on a $5-billion superconducting super collider physics research center in Texas. The energy and water projects appropriations bill for fiscal 1990 also includes $636 million for environmental clean-ups at the nation's nuclear weapons plants. The compromise between earlier House and Senate versions of the bill was approved by the House 392 to 27.
NEWS
July 28, 1989
The Senate agreed to release the first federal construction funds for a $4.4-billion atom smasher, which Texans are counting on to bring jobs and revenues and which scientists hope will solve a few mysteries of the universe. The spending bill containing the funds provides $135 million to begin construction of the superconducting super collider in Waxahachie, Tex., and $90 million for research and development.
NEWS
January 12, 1988
The Energy Department has delayed announcement of its own "best qualified list" of states for the multibillion dollar super collider scientific research project, officials said. The department, which is reviewing a report from a special scientific panel that recommended eight sites in late December, had been expected to announce its short list for the superconducting super collider today. But department spokesman Jeff Sherwood said the announcement had been delayed until Jan. 19.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1994 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Researchers at UCLA have taken a promising step toward a new generation of the high-energy machines that physicists use to pick the locks of creation. With a pair of carbon dioxide lasers, they persuaded electrons to "surf" on plasma waves of superheated, energized gas, briefly speeding them up to the highest energy level seen so far. The technique accelerates particles more rapidly than modern atom smashers, like a car that can go from 0 to 50 m.p.h. in 100 milliseconds.
NEWS
February 15, 1994 | LIANNE HART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Congress canceled funding for the $11-billion superconducting super collider last October, lawmakers called for the "orderly" shutdown of what would have been the largest scientific instrument ever built. Having decided what to do, Congress didn't say how to do it. As Dr. Tom Bush, associate director of the laboratory near rural Waxahachie, Tex., says: "It's 35 miles out in a cow pasture. What happens to everything that's there?" Bush doesn't mean the desks and chairs and office supplies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 1993 | From Associated Press
Disappointed American physicists are anxiously searching for a way to salvage some science from the ill-fated superconducting super collider. The $11-billion super collider has been the highest priority of the U.S. high-energy physics program for the past decade--the next leap in the human quest to discover the origins of matter. With no white knight on the horizon, "big science" may have to go international. No single nation, it seems, can afford it.
NEWS
December 5, 1993 | JOY ASCHENBACH, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC
Disappointed American physicists are anxiously searching for a way to salvage some science from the ill-fated superconducting super collider. The $11-billion super collider has been the highest priority of the U.S. high-energy physics program for the last decade--the next leap in the human quest to discover the origins of matter. With no white knight on the horizon, "big science" may have to go international. No single nation, it seems, can afford it.
OPINION
November 21, 1993 | HAZEL R. O'LEARY and GEORGE E. BROWN JR., Hazel R. O'Leary is U.S. secretary of energy. Rep. George E. Brown Jr. (D-Colton) is chairman of the House Committee on Science, Space and Technology.
The superconducting super collider as we know it is now dead, yet the quest for a comprehensive understanding of the world around us lives on. The scientific questions that compelled development of the SSC will not suddenly disappear, nor are they likely to be answered by anything other than a "big science" endeavor during the next century.
NEWS
November 7, 1993
The House voted resoundingly to terminate the superconducting super collider research project in Waxahachie, Tex. The death sentence was included in the Department of Energy's fiscal 1994 budget (HR 2445). The Senate later went along, and the massive construction job has been declared dead by supporters as well as foes in Congress. The super collider was envisioned to conduct high-speed proton collisions in an underground loop, yielding information on the origin of matter.
NEWS
October 28, 1993 | From Associated Press
Congress on Wednesday sent President Clinton legislation to kill the superconducting super collider, putting the death of the multibillion-dollar atom smasher a pen stroke away. By an 89-11 vote, the Senate sent the measure to the White House for Clinton's expected signature. To the chagrin of longtime supporters, the $640 million in the bill originally intended for continued construction on the huge Texas physics project was rechanneled to close out contracts.
NEWS
October 22, 1993 | From Associated Press
Congress officially killed the superconducting super collider Thursday, halting construction of the giant machine that was one-fifth complete at a cost of $2 billion. The $640 million sought by the Clinton Administration to continue construction this year will instead be used to shut down the project under an agreement reached Thursday by House and Senate negotiators. "The SSC has been lynched, and we have to bury the body," said Sen. J. Bennett Johnston (D-La.
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