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Super Show Productions Company

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1997 | JOSE CARDENAS
The 28-year-old operator of a Tustin-based company was sentenced to a Caltrans work crew after pleading no contest to illegally posting signs in the San Fernando Valley advertising a computer show, authorities said Thursday. Darin Lloyd Slack of Super Show Productions Inc. was sentenced Wednesday to 30 days by Van Nuys Municipal Judge Karen Nudell after he pleaded to one count of illegally posting signs on public property.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1997 | JOSE CARDENAS
The 28-year-old operator of a Tustin-based company was sentenced to a Caltrans work crew after pleading no contest to illegally posting signs in the San Fernando Valley advertising a computer show, authorities said Thursday. Darin Lloyd Slack of Super Show Productions Inc. was sentenced Wednesday to 30 days by Van Nuys Municipal Judge Karen Nudell after he pleaded to one count of illegally posting signs on public property.
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BUSINESS
August 19, 1997 | DARRELL SATZMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The owners of a southern Orange County production company were charged Monday with illegally posting advertising materials in the San Fernando Valley. Kay D. Slack, 57, and her son, Darin Lloyd Slack, 28, of Tustin, who operate Super Show Productions Inc. in Rancho Santa Margarita, were charged Monday with three misdemeanor counts of illegally posting signs on public property. If convicted, the Slacks face maximum sentences of six months in jail and $1,000 fines on each count.
BUSINESS
August 19, 1997 | DARRELL SATZMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The owners of a southern Orange County production company were charged Monday with illegally posting advertising materials in the San Fernando Valley. Kay D. Slack, 57, and her son, Darin Lloyd Slack, 28, of Tustin, who operate Super Show Productions Inc. in Rancho Santa Margarita, were charged Monday with three misdemeanor counts of illegally posting signs on public property. If convicted, the Slacks face maximum sentences of six months in jail and $1,000 fines on each count.
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