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MAGAZINE
November 2, 1986
If you're at your wit's end about ants crawling into your pet's food dish, you might consider the Superbowl 4 Pets. The heavy polypropylene molded bowl has a moat for holding water that prevents the insects' advance. Designed by dog-owner/entrepreneur Jerry Peterson, it is 13 3/4 inches across and tip-proof. (Peterson says that a smaller bowl for cats and small dogs is on the way.) Manufactured by Pal-O-Mine Products Inc.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
January 19, 1999 | T.J. SIMERS
A review of championship Sunday in the NFL, and if you think you were stunned by the Falcons' upset of the Vikings, how about league officials? "You could tell they weren't expecting us," said Atlanta Coach Dan Reeves after reviewing the schedule of events for Super Bowl week with NFL officials, "because it said, 'Atlanta Falcons, head coach Denny Green.' " The itinerary, which included several references to the Vikings, was corrected later, but not entirely.
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SPORTS
November 29, 1987 | TOM FRIEND, The Washington Post
A psychologist in San Jose swears he knows why Super Bowl champions tend to get bowled over the following season. His name is Dr. Thomas Tutko, and he says football players can be separated into four basic groups by unique criteria. --Ring envy. Apparently, diamonds are a boy's best friend. Tutko says many football players play solely for that championship ring and, when they finally have it, the only thing left in life is finding a full-length fur coat. Winning?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 1988 | ARMANDO ACUNA, Times Staff Writer
Starting tonight, the wooing of the media covering the Super Bowl begins in earnest. By most accounts, the string of parties for the media on tap in San Diego--ranging from tonight's bash at the Hotel del Coronado and a Tijuana trek to dinner with Shamu and breaking bread with Pete Rozelle--is unprecedented. And that is saying a lot.
SPORTS
June 8, 1986 | SHAV GLICK, Times Staff Writer
Ricky Johnson demonstrated to 50,335 spectators Saturday night at the Coors Superbowl of Motocross in the Coliseum why he has become the nonpareil of American motocross riders this year. The 21-year-old rider from El Cajon, already a winner of the Nippondenso Supercross and national 250cc championships, added his first Coliseum victory on his factory-backed Honda.
SPORTS
June 28, 1987 | SHAV GLICK, Times Staff Writer
When 21 motorcycle riders race for an opening large enough for about three of them, strange things can happen. That's what occurred at the start of the 16th annual Superbowl of Motocross at the Coliseum Saturday night, and the ensuing mixup led to one of the most exciting races in series history. Rick Johnson, the defending Superbowl champion from El Cajon, got caught in the tight quarters and fell back to 18th. Jeff Ward, the newly crowned Supercross champion from Mission Viejo, was 13th.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 1988 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, Times Staff Writer
Ed Castle, 28, has scalped tickets for a decade, but whatever you do, don't call him a scalper. "I'm a ticket broker," he said with a scowl. He's a ticket broker "about to get rich." Super Bowl XXII, scheduled for Jan. 31 in San Diego Jack Murphy Stadium, may bring Castle his "all-time biggest haul" as a scalper, er, ticket broker. He expects something in the neighborhood of $60,000. Wednesday morning, Castle was in the stadium parking lot at 7 o'clock, milling around Gate E looking for action.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 1988 | GREG JOHNSON, Times Staff Writer
By Super Bowl Sunday, crosswind runway 13/31 at Lindbergh Field should look like "an expensive used car lot," according to Jack Barkley, director of operations for Jimsair Aviation Services. Instead of used cars, the usually little-used runway will be filled with as many as 300 luxuriously appointed corporate and private jets that will be carrying VIP passengers into San Diego for the NFL title game, according to Barkley, whose company services private and commercial aircraft at Lindbergh.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 1988 | ANDREA ESTEPA, Times Staff Writer
Lee Galloway isn't a football player. He isn't even a football fan. He's never had any burning desire to go to the Super Bowl. But, come Jan. 31, there he'll be at San Diego Jack Murphy Stadium. He won't be watching the game. He'll be waiting for halftime. Galloway, a local piano teacher, is one of 88 pianists who will perform at the halftime extravaganza being produced by Radio City Music Hall Productions of New York.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 1988 | ARMANDO ACUNA, Times Staff Writer
Starting tonight, the wooing of the media covering the Super Bowl begins in earnest. By most accounts, the string of parties for the media on tap in San Diego--ranging from tonight's bash at the Hotel del Coronado and a Tijuana trek to dinner with Shamu and breaking bread with Pete Rozelle--is unprecedented. And that is saying a lot.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 1988 | ANDREA ESTEPA, Times Staff Writer
Lee Galloway isn't a football player. He isn't even a football fan. He's never had any burning desire to go to the Super Bowl. But, come Jan. 31, there he'll be at San Diego Jack Murphy Stadium. He won't be watching the game. He'll be waiting for halftime. Galloway, a local piano teacher, is one of 88 pianists who will perform at the halftime extravaganza being produced by Radio City Music Hall Productions of New York.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 1988 | DAVID SMOLLAR, Times Staff Writer
When watching previous Super Bowls on television, Megan Haggerty always wondered how the performers in the pregame and halftime shows were picked. Now she knows. The ninth-grade drill team member from Crawford High School is one of more than 500 San Diego County dance and cheerleading students selected for the game's entertainment extravaganzas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 1988 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, Times Staff Writer
Ed Castle, 28, has scalped tickets for a decade, but whatever you do, don't call him a scalper. "I'm a ticket broker," he said with a scowl. He's a ticket broker "about to get rich." Super Bowl XXII, scheduled for Jan. 31 in San Diego Jack Murphy Stadium, may bring Castle his "all-time biggest haul" as a scalper, er, ticket broker. He expects something in the neighborhood of $60,000. Wednesday morning, Castle was in the stadium parking lot at 7 o'clock, milling around Gate E looking for action.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 1988 | GREG JOHNSON, Times Staff Writer
By Super Bowl Sunday, crosswind runway 13/31 at Lindbergh Field should look like "an expensive used car lot," according to Jack Barkley, director of operations for Jimsair Aviation Services. Instead of used cars, the usually little-used runway will be filled with as many as 300 luxuriously appointed corporate and private jets that will be carrying VIP passengers into San Diego for the NFL title game, according to Barkley, whose company services private and commercial aircraft at Lindbergh.
SPORTS
November 29, 1987 | TOM FRIEND, The Washington Post
A psychologist in San Jose swears he knows why Super Bowl champions tend to get bowled over the following season. His name is Dr. Thomas Tutko, and he says football players can be separated into four basic groups by unique criteria. --Ring envy. Apparently, diamonds are a boy's best friend. Tutko says many football players play solely for that championship ring and, when they finally have it, the only thing left in life is finding a full-length fur coat. Winning?
SPORTS
June 28, 1987 | SHAV GLICK, Times Staff Writer
When 21 motorcycle riders race for an opening large enough for about three of them, strange things can happen. That's what occurred at the start of the 16th annual Superbowl of Motocross at the Coliseum Saturday night, and the ensuing mixup led to one of the most exciting races in series history. Rick Johnson, the defending Superbowl champion from El Cajon, got caught in the tight quarters and fell back to 18th. Jeff Ward, the newly crowned Supercross champion from Mission Viejo, was 13th.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 1988 | DAVID SMOLLAR, Times Staff Writer
When watching previous Super Bowls on television, Megan Haggerty always wondered how the performers in the pregame and halftime shows were picked. Now she knows. The ninth-grade drill team member from Crawford High School is one of more than 500 San Diego County dance and cheerleading students selected for the game's entertainment extravaganzas.
SPORTS
January 19, 1999 | T.J. SIMERS
A review of championship Sunday in the NFL, and if you think you were stunned by the Falcons' upset of the Vikings, how about league officials? "You could tell they weren't expecting us," said Atlanta Coach Dan Reeves after reviewing the schedule of events for Super Bowl week with NFL officials, "because it said, 'Atlanta Falcons, head coach Denny Green.' " The itinerary, which included several references to the Vikings, was corrected later, but not entirely.
MAGAZINE
November 2, 1986
If you're at your wit's end about ants crawling into your pet's food dish, you might consider the Superbowl 4 Pets. The heavy polypropylene molded bowl has a moat for holding water that prevents the insects' advance. Designed by dog-owner/entrepreneur Jerry Peterson, it is 13 3/4 inches across and tip-proof. (Peterson says that a smaller bowl for cats and small dogs is on the way.) Manufactured by Pal-O-Mine Products Inc.
SPORTS
June 8, 1986 | SHAV GLICK, Times Staff Writer
Ricky Johnson demonstrated to 50,335 spectators Saturday night at the Coors Superbowl of Motocross in the Coliseum why he has become the nonpareil of American motocross riders this year. The 21-year-old rider from El Cajon, already a winner of the Nippondenso Supercross and national 250cc championships, added his first Coliseum victory on his factory-backed Honda.
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