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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1985 | Associated Press
The Cray-2 is only four feet high and four feet in diameter, but the new $17-million device at NASA's Ames Research Center is the world's fastest, most powerful supercomputer. Because its micro-miniaturized electronic circuits are packed so close together, the compact machine is the first supercomputer to have components immersed in a colorless fluorocarbon liquid that prevents overheating. The liquid also often is used as artificial human blood plasma.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2014 | By Jessica Gelt
Fans of the television series "Lost" are licking their lips in anticipation of a new cyber-themed spy thriller called "Intelligence. " The show, which premieres on CBS on Tuesday, stars Josh Holloway, who stole hearts and won accolades for his portrayal of the rakish con man James "Sawyer" Ford on "Lost. " "Lost" intrigued viewers with the ominous mysteries of a mythical island for six seasons, and aired its controversial finale in 2010. After that, Holloway strayed from television in favor of film, appearing in "Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol," "Paranoia" and "Battle of the Year.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 2012 | Scott Gold
Here in the shortgrass prairie, where being stuck in the ways of the Old West is a point of civic pride, scientists are building a machine that will, in effect, look into the future. This month, on a barren Wyoming landscape dotted with gopher holes and hay bales, the federal government is assembling a supercomputer 10 years in the making, one of the fastest computers ever built and the largest ever devoted to the study of atmospheric science. The National Center for Atmospheric Research's supercomputer has been dubbed Yellowstone, after the nearby national park, but it could have been named Nerdvana.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2013 | By Julie Makinen
BEIJING -- “Transcendence,” the upcoming Johnny Depp sci-fi film directed by Christopher Nolan's longtime cinematographer Wally Pfister, will get a boost in China from DMG Entertainment, the Beijing-based company that helped add Chinese elements to “Iron Man 3” and “Looper.” But don't look for any extra China-specific footage in the 2014 film. DMG said Thursday it had partnered with Alcon Entertainment to help finance, produce and distribute the movie in China, which is now filming stateside and will be released in the U.S. by Warner Bros.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2011 | By Melissa Maerz, Los Angeles Times
Will supercomputers one day crush our puny mortal brains? Some scientists at IBM believe it's possible. And if they have their way, it will start Monday night. Beginning on Valentine's Day, an IBM-engineered machine named Watson will compete in a three-night, two-game stretch on "Jeopardy!," battling all-star champions Ken Jennings and Brad Rutter. Only one will emerge as interspecies overlord, but with 10 refrigerator-sized racks of IBM Power 7 Systems firing its mega-mind, Watson's got a pretty good shot.
BUSINESS
April 28, 1989
Control Data: The Minneapolis-based company, which is shutting down its supercomputer business, reported a 55% decline in earnings. First-quarter earnings were $3.5 million on revenue of $843.5 million, compared to earnings of $7.7 million on revenue of $902.2 million for the same period a year earlier. The latest results were hurt by losses in computer systems and supercomputer operations. There were gains, however, in such areas as information services and government systems.
NEWS
May 20, 1989 | From a Times Staff Writer
Saying that computer technology is a vital element of America's infrastructure, Sen. Albert Gore Jr. (D-Tenn.) on Friday urged that the federal government devote $1.75 billion over the next five years to make the nation a "supercomputer superpower." The proposal, introduced in new legislation, would establish a national data network to make high-performance computers more accessible to researchers, educators and businesses. At the same time, it would provide aid to the private sector's efforts to develop supercomputer technology.
OPINION
March 2, 1986
It was very interesting to learn, through The Times (Feb. 16) that NASA's Ames Research Center's supercomputer has calculated pi to the 29,360,000 decimal place. This sounds like an attempt to explain eternity, for which there is an old aphorism: Every hundred years a sparrow rubs its beak on a mountain. When the mountain is worn down, that is a moment of eternity! HELEN LEE Studio City
BUSINESS
June 4, 1989 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, Times Staff Writer
Why did Seymour Cray leave Cray Research, the Minneapolis supercomputer company he founded 17 years ago, to form yet another supercomputer firm? Some analysts have surmised that engineering genius Cray wanted to escape Wall Street's fixation on quarterly financial reports. Others, including Cray Research officials, have said the company lacked the financial strength to support two rival supercomputer designs. But both explanations are off the mark, says Cray Research Chairman John Rollwagen, in his first detailed explanation of the breakup announced last month.
BUSINESS
April 11, 1989 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, Times Staff Writer
Upping the ante in the fierce battle among the world's supercomputer makers, a partnership including Japan's giant NEC Corp. unveiled plans Monday for what it called "the world's fastest computer," a machine up to eight times more powerful than any currently available. Although some analysts said the planned supercomputer could alter the balance of power in an industry that has been dominated by a U.S. company, Cray Research of Minneapolis, others cautioned against reading too much into the announcement.
BUSINESS
June 18, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
In the race to build the fastest computer in the world, America is back on top. On Monday, a super-computer designed by IBM for the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), took the first spot on the Top 500 list, a list that comes out twice a year ranking the 500 fastest computers on the planet.  It is the first time the U.S. has topped the list since November 2009.  The winning super-computer is called Sequoia, and it is housed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, Calif.  Sequoia will be used to build complex models that let scientists test the nation's stockpile of nuclear weapons without having to do nuclear testing in the real world.  So how fast is the fastest computer in the world?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 2012 | Scott Gold
Here in the shortgrass prairie, where being stuck in the ways of the Old West is a point of civic pride, scientists are building a machine that will, in effect, look into the future. This month, on a barren Wyoming landscape dotted with gopher holes and hay bales, the federal government is assembling a supercomputer 10 years in the making, one of the fastest computers ever built and the largest ever devoted to the study of atmospheric science. The National Center for Atmospheric Research's supercomputer has been dubbed Yellowstone, after the nearby national park, but it could have been named Nerdvana.
BUSINESS
September 13, 2011 | By Duke Helfand, Los Angeles Times
Instant diagnosis? That's the idea behind a new partnership between insurance giant WellPoint Inc. and IBM Corp. WellPoint, the nation's largest health insurer by membership, is tapping IBM's Watson supercomputer to diagnose medical illnesses and, within seconds, recommend treatment options for patients. The new system will debut at several cancer centers early next year. Executives at the two companies say that Watson, best known for defeating "Jeopardy!" quiz champs on the popular television show earlier this year, can sift through millions of pages of data and offer diagnoses to doctors virtually on the spot.
NEWS
March 1, 2011 | By James Oliphant, Washington Bureau
Watson -- the IBM supercomputer that cleaned up on "Jeopardy!" -- lost to Rep. Rush Holt of New Jersey in a battle of wits Monday evening at a D.C. hotel. So it looks like we can put off welcoming our new machine overlords for one more day. The faux "Jeopardy!" contest pitting Watson against Holt and some other House members was intended to emphasize the need for increased math and science education to bolster U.S. global competitiveness. Holt, a physicist who was a five-time winner on "Jeopardy!"
BUSINESS
February 28, 2011 | By Hugo Martín, Los Angeles Times
After delaying for more than three years a bill to reauthorize the Federal Aviation Administration, Congress appears ready to adopt legislation that would also make several changes in the way airlines operate. For example: An amendment to the bill could more than double the number of daily round-trip flights between the western U.S. and Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport, to 28 from 12. Long-distance flights into Reagan National have been limited because of noise concerns and an effort to shift more flights to Washington Dulles International Airport.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2011 | By Melissa Maerz, Los Angeles Times
Will supercomputers one day crush our puny mortal brains? Some scientists at IBM believe it's possible. And if they have their way, it will start Monday night. Beginning on Valentine's Day, an IBM-engineered machine named Watson will compete in a three-night, two-game stretch on "Jeopardy!," battling all-star champions Ken Jennings and Brad Rutter. Only one will emerge as interspecies overlord, but with 10 refrigerator-sized racks of IBM Power 7 Systems firing its mega-mind, Watson's got a pretty good shot.
BUSINESS
April 28, 1985 | From Christian Science Monitor
Sequestered inside a well-guarded compound on the edge of Tokyo, Mikio Watanabe's SX-2 supercomputer cuts a singularly unimpressive figure. For starters, it is bulky and gray, with all the visual appeal of a filing cabinet. Watanabe, an engineer at NEC laboratory here who has spent every working moment for the last seven years on this numerical Goliath, senses his visitor's disappointment. "OK, comparisons speak for themselves," he says.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2013 | By Julie Makinen
BEIJING -- “Transcendence,” the upcoming Johnny Depp sci-fi film directed by Christopher Nolan's longtime cinematographer Wally Pfister, will get a boost in China from DMG Entertainment, the Beijing-based company that helped add Chinese elements to “Iron Man 3” and “Looper.” But don't look for any extra China-specific footage in the 2014 film. DMG said Thursday it had partnered with Alcon Entertainment to help finance, produce and distribute the movie in China, which is now filming stateside and will be released in the U.S. by Warner Bros.
SCIENCE
August 6, 2010 | By Rachel Bernstein, Los Angeles Times
Supercomputers may routinely defeat human chess champions these days, but sometimes regular folks still beat out fancy technology. An example published in the journal Nature this week: Lay people were better than a computer program dreamed up by scientists at figuring out how a complicated protein takes its shape. In a broad array of disciplines — molecular biology, astronomy, archaeology and more — researchers are outsourcing their time-consuming dirty work to volunteer gamers and everyday people with some extra hours on their hands, with promising results.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 2007 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
Teresa Reynolds, daughter Kelsea, son Tyler and their miniature dachshund Sable settled into chairs Saturday morning at the San Diego Supercomputer Center for an early Christmas present. A satellite connection was established, and soon Marine Master Gunnery Sgt.-select Kenneth Reynolds was on the screen from the air base at Al Asad, Iraq, as part of a program to keep military families in touch with deployed loved ones through teleconferencing.
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