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Supercomputer Systems Company

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BUSINESS
December 24, 1987 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, Times Staff Writer
Christmas came a bit early this year for supercomputer designer Steve Chen. On Tuesday, the soft-spoken 43-year-old engineer, who dreams of designing the world's fastest computer, announced that industry giant IBM had agreed to back his fledgling $100-million venture. Chen boasts that it's a sure-win combination that will produce a supercomputer unlike any other. "We have great design capabilities," Chen said of Supercomputer Systems, his 3-month-old company in Eau Claire, Wis.
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BUSINESS
February 15, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
New Supercomputer Venture: Steve Chen and former employees of his failed Supercomputers Systems Inc. announced a new supercomputer venture just one day after abandoning efforts to keep his company alive. Chen said the new company will seek to create the world's fastest computer. "In our attempt to save SSI, we found a number of potential investors who were interested in our team and our shared vision," Chen said. The new company, SuperComputers International of Eau Claire., Wisc.
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BUSINESS
January 26, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Supercomputer Systems Closes: Supercomputer Systems Inc., unable to find new investors to build the world's most powerful computer after losing IBM's support, closed its doors and left about 300 people jobless. Steve Chen, founder of the Eau Claire, Wis., company, said he was unable to find an investment banker willing to raise money through an SSI stock offering to complete development and manufacture of the SS-1.
BUSINESS
September 24, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
International Business Machines said Monday that it has signed a joint-development agreement with Thinking Machines Corp. that strengthens a new technology for the world's largest and most powerful computer systems. Thinking Machines, a small Boston-area company, pioneered "massively parallel" processing, in which hundreds or thousands of microprocessor chips simultaneously solve pieces of a large problem.
BUSINESS
December 30, 1987 | JAMES FLANIGAN
If you looked behind the glare of publicity at recent events in the supercomputer business, you could learn a lot about how companies and nations achieve and maintain technological leadership. Challenge and response, the late, great historian Arnold Toynbee would call it. Others would simply call it competition. The publicity surrounded Cray Research Corp., the Minneapolis company founded in 1972 by Seymour Cray, a brilliant engineer and original thinker, who left Control Data Corp.
BUSINESS
September 24, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
International Business Machines said Monday that it has signed a joint-development agreement with Thinking Machines Corp. that strengthens a new technology for the world's largest and most powerful computer systems. Thinking Machines, a small Boston-area company, pioneered "massively parallel" processing, in which hundreds or thousands of microprocessor chips simultaneously solve pieces of a large problem.
BUSINESS
December 30, 1987 | JAMES FLANIGAN
If you looked behind the glare of publicity at recent events in the supercomputer business, you could learn a lot about how companies and nations achieve and maintain technological leadership. Challenge and response, the late, great historian Arnold Toynbee would call it. Others would simply call it competition. The publicity surrounded Cray Research Corp., the Minneapolis company founded in 1972 by Seymour Cray, a brilliant engineer and original thinker, who left Control Data Corp.
BUSINESS
December 24, 1987 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, Times Staff Writer
Christmas came a bit early this year for supercomputer designer Steve Chen. On Tuesday, the soft-spoken 43-year-old engineer, who dreams of designing the world's fastest computer, announced that industry giant IBM had agreed to back his fledgling $100-million venture. Chen boasts that it's a sure-win combination that will produce a supercomputer unlike any other. "We have great design capabilities," Chen said of Supercomputer Systems, his 3-month-old company in Eau Claire, Wis.
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