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BUSINESS
June 8, 1991 | From United Press International
The United States and Japan have agreed to tighten export controls on supercomputers that are used in the development of nuclear weapons and missiles, the White House announced Friday. White House press secretary Marlin Fitzwater said: "Great importance should be attached to export controls on supercomputers for the purpose of preventing the proliferation of such weapons."
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2014 | By Jessica Gelt
Fans of the television series "Lost" are licking their lips in anticipation of a new cyber-themed spy thriller called "Intelligence. " The show, which premieres on CBS on Tuesday, stars Josh Holloway, who stole hearts and won accolades for his portrayal of the rakish con man James "Sawyer" Ford on "Lost. " "Lost" intrigued viewers with the ominous mysteries of a mythical island for six seasons, and aired its controversial finale in 2010. After that, Holloway strayed from television in favor of film, appearing in "Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol," "Paranoia" and "Battle of the Year.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2007 | Robert Lloyd, Times Staff Writer
In a universe in which nothing is really ever created or destroyed, there are only so many stories to tell; you can switch the atoms around, but most everything will look like something you've seen before. This week sees the premiere of two series so structurally alike they might have been created from the same "Mad Libs" page.
BUSINESS
June 18, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
In the race to build the fastest computer in the world, America is back on top. On Monday, a super-computer designed by IBM for the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), took the first spot on the Top 500 list, a list that comes out twice a year ranking the 500 fastest computers on the planet.  It is the first time the U.S. has topped the list since November 2009.  The winning super-computer is called Sequoia, and it is housed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, Calif.  Sequoia will be used to build complex models that let scientists test the nation's stockpile of nuclear weapons without having to do nuclear testing in the real world.  So how fast is the fastest computer in the world?
BUSINESS
April 25, 1990 | DATAQUEST, DATAQUEST is a market-intelligence firm based in San Jose
A supercomputer capable of performing billions of calculations per second may cost as much as $25 million. Therefore the sale of as few as 15 supercomputers can make the difference between a strong and weak performance for the entire industry. Two factors may cause another shakeout among manufacturers. First, government institutions are cutting back. They have consistently purchased the largest systems, contributing, for example, 50% of the revenue of Cray Research Inc., the industry leader.
BUSINESS
February 13, 1992 | From Associated Press
IBM will announce today that it has established a laboratory to develop supercomputers containing hundreds or even thousands of processor chips, machines that would challenge the fastest computers ever built. The lab would mark IBM's entry into a niche market that it had previously avoided. Supercomputers are used for highly complicated scientific calculations such as long-range weather forecasting. International Business Machines Corp.
BUSINESS
April 10, 1990 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Less than two weeks after trade negotiators signed a historic pact to boost sales of U.S. supercomputers in Japan, a major defense contractor said Monday that it wants to install Japanese machines in the United States and worldwide. A spokesman for Bethpage, N.Y.-based Grumman Corp.
BUSINESS
January 8, 1997 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Boulder, Colo.-based National Center for Atmospheric Research has acquired an additional Cray supercomputer after Minnesota-based Cray Research, the last U.S. supercomputer manufacturer, blocked the federal agency's plans to purchase a Japanese-made NEC supercomputer.
BUSINESS
December 24, 1991 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Legendary computer designer Seymour Cray's attempt to revolutionize the way that the world's most powerful computers are built received a stunning setback Monday when the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory canceled a $30-million order for the first Cray-3 computer from Cray Computer Corp. Although the finished system was not scheduled for delivery until 1992, Lawrence Livermore said in a statement that because Cray Computer had missed a Dec.
SCIENCE
May 15, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The United States is launching a push to regain the lead in the competition over who has the most powerful computer, announcing plans Wednesday to build the world's fastest civilian computer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee with the help of three private computer companies. The team envisions a computer capable of performing 50 trillion calculations per second on a sustained basis. The record is 36 trillion calculations per second, held by a Japanese machine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 2012 | Scott Gold
Here in the shortgrass prairie, where being stuck in the ways of the Old West is a point of civic pride, scientists are building a machine that will, in effect, look into the future. This month, on a barren Wyoming landscape dotted with gopher holes and hay bales, the federal government is assembling a supercomputer 10 years in the making, one of the fastest computers ever built and the largest ever devoted to the study of atmospheric science. The National Center for Atmospheric Research's supercomputer has been dubbed Yellowstone, after the nearby national park, but it could have been named Nerdvana.
BUSINESS
September 13, 2011 | By Duke Helfand, Los Angeles Times
Instant diagnosis? That's the idea behind a new partnership between insurance giant WellPoint Inc. and IBM Corp. WellPoint, the nation's largest health insurer by membership, is tapping IBM's Watson supercomputer to diagnose medical illnesses and, within seconds, recommend treatment options for patients. The new system will debut at several cancer centers early next year. Executives at the two companies say that Watson, best known for defeating "Jeopardy!" quiz champs on the popular television show earlier this year, can sift through millions of pages of data and offer diagnoses to doctors virtually on the spot.
NEWS
March 1, 2011 | By James Oliphant, Washington Bureau
Watson -- the IBM supercomputer that cleaned up on "Jeopardy!" -- lost to Rep. Rush Holt of New Jersey in a battle of wits Monday evening at a D.C. hotel. So it looks like we can put off welcoming our new machine overlords for one more day. The faux "Jeopardy!" contest pitting Watson against Holt and some other House members was intended to emphasize the need for increased math and science education to bolster U.S. global competitiveness. Holt, a physicist who was a five-time winner on "Jeopardy!"
BUSINESS
February 28, 2011 | By Hugo Martín, Los Angeles Times
After delaying for more than three years a bill to reauthorize the Federal Aviation Administration, Congress appears ready to adopt legislation that would also make several changes in the way airlines operate. For example: An amendment to the bill could more than double the number of daily round-trip flights between the western U.S. and Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport, to 28 from 12. Long-distance flights into Reagan National have been limited because of noise concerns and an effort to shift more flights to Washington Dulles International Airport.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2011 | By Melissa Maerz, Los Angeles Times
Will supercomputers one day crush our puny mortal brains? Some scientists at IBM believe it's possible. And if they have their way, it will start Monday night. Beginning on Valentine's Day, an IBM-engineered machine named Watson will compete in a three-night, two-game stretch on "Jeopardy!," battling all-star champions Ken Jennings and Brad Rutter. Only one will emerge as interspecies overlord, but with 10 refrigerator-sized racks of IBM Power 7 Systems firing its mega-mind, Watson's got a pretty good shot.
SCIENCE
August 6, 2010 | By Rachel Bernstein, Los Angeles Times
Supercomputers may routinely defeat human chess champions these days, but sometimes regular folks still beat out fancy technology. An example published in the journal Nature this week: Lay people were better than a computer program dreamed up by scientists at figuring out how a complicated protein takes its shape. In a broad array of disciplines — molecular biology, astronomy, archaeology and more — researchers are outsourcing their time-consuming dirty work to volunteer gamers and everyday people with some extra hours on their hands, with promising results.
BUSINESS
March 30, 1990 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Marking its first move into lower-priced, lowered-powered models, supercomputer pioneer Cray Research said Thursday that it has tentatively agreed to acquire a Silicon Valley maker of so-called mini-supercomputers. Terms of the all-cash purchase of Supertek Computer of Santa Clara, Calif., were not disclosed.
BUSINESS
April 25, 1989 | From Reuters
The U.S. government is gearing up to prevent Japan from dominating yet another segment of the high-technology industry, the small but strategic field of supercomputers. Supercomputers are used for the most complex computing jobs such as determining air flow over an airplane wing, designing new weapons systems, cracking military codes or mapping the human body's genes. Priced at $20 million apiece, the machines' processing speed is so great it is measured in billions of computing operations per second.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 2007 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
Teresa Reynolds, daughter Kelsea, son Tyler and their miniature dachshund Sable settled into chairs Saturday morning at the San Diego Supercomputer Center for an early Christmas present. A satellite connection was established, and soon Marine Master Gunnery Sgt.-select Kenneth Reynolds was on the screen from the air base at Al Asad, Iraq, as part of a program to keep military families in touch with deployed loved ones through teleconferencing.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2007 | Robert Lloyd, Times Staff Writer
In a universe in which nothing is really ever created or destroyed, there are only so many stories to tell; you can switch the atoms around, but most everything will look like something you've seen before. This week sees the premiere of two series so structurally alike they might have been created from the same "Mad Libs" page.
Los Angeles Times Articles
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