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Superconducting Super Collider

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1993
Re "Super Collider is More Than Science," Commentary, Sept. 24: It is difficult for me not to be skeptical in the extreme as to the advisability of continuing with the superconducting super collider (SSC) at this particular time. Nina Byers and Roberto Peccei stated that more than $1.5 billion and a decade of work have been invested in this project. They claim further that "if the SSC is funded, it would cost less than $1 billion per year for the next 10 years"--only $10 billion! The physicists claim also that the SSC would help us to understand this issue of "mass" and "dark matter" and the interaction of "quarks and leptons."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 1993 | From Associated Press
Disappointed American physicists are anxiously searching for a way to salvage some science from the ill-fated superconducting super collider. The $11-billion super collider has been the highest priority of the U.S. high-energy physics program for the past decade--the next leap in the human quest to discover the origins of matter. With no white knight on the horizon, "big science" may have to go international. No single nation, it seems, can afford it.
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NEWS
September 7, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
A joint panel of the House and Senate today approved one of the most ambitious scientific projects ever, giving the green light for construction of the mammoth superconducting super collider in Texas. The Appropriations Conference Committee approved $225 million in 1990 funding for the world's largest atom smasher, going with the higher figure approved by the Senate, with virtually no debate.
NEWS
December 5, 1993 | JOY ASCHENBACH, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC
Disappointed American physicists are anxiously searching for a way to salvage some science from the ill-fated superconducting super collider. The $11-billion super collider has been the highest priority of the U.S. high-energy physics program for the last decade--the next leap in the human quest to discover the origins of matter. With no white knight on the horizon, "big science" may have to go international. No single nation, it seems, can afford it.
BUSINESS
March 1, 1989 | From Associated Press
When the federal government decided to put the superconducting super collider here, bands played and folks celebrated. You would have thought the Spindletop Gusher of 1901 was pumping oil again. Gov. Bill Clements declared a great day for Texas. Newspapers ran huge headlines. Politicians predicted new jobs and a building boom. And the Chamber of Commerce toasted Waxahachie's good fortune.
NEWS
June 20, 1990 | From United Press International
The House Tuesday approved the first of this year's 13 spending bills, a $20.9-billion package of energy and water development projects that includes the massive superconducting super collider. The 1991 bill, approved 355 to 59, includes $318 million to build the giant particle accelerator at Waxahachie, Tex. But Rep. Howard Wolpe (D-Mich.) objected that funds absorbed by the super collider "will ultimately starve other energy research projects."
NEWS
September 15, 1985
A parcel of land straddling the Los Angeles-Kern County border and two other locations in the San Francisco vicinity are under consideration as sites for the world's largest scientific machine--the Superconducting Super Collider, an atom-smasher that would be about 20 miles in diameter.
NEWS
October 28, 1993 | From Associated Press
Congress on Wednesday sent President Clinton legislation to kill the superconducting super collider, putting the death of the multibillion-dollar atom smasher a pen stroke away. By an 89-11 vote, the Senate sent the measure to the White House for Clinton's expected signature. To the chagrin of longtime supporters, the $640 million in the bill originally intended for continued construction on the huge Texas physics project was rechanneled to close out contracts.
NEWS
December 5, 1993 | JOY ASCHENBACH, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC
Disappointed American physicists are anxiously searching for a way to salvage some science from the ill-fated superconducting super collider. The $11-billion super collider has been the highest priority of the U.S. high-energy physics program for the last decade--the next leap in the human quest to discover the origins of matter. With no white knight on the horizon, "big science" may have to go international. No single nation, it seems, can afford it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1992
By a vote of 232 to 181, the House voted to kill the Superconducting Super Collider project under development at Waxahachie, Tex. This removed $450 million from a fiscal 1993 appropriations bill (HR 5373), leaving $34 million for shutting down the project. The issue is now before the Senate. About $1 billion has been appropriated toward the estimated $8.3-billion final cost of the proposed 54-mile oval tunnel for breaking up atoms in high-speed collisions.
NEWS
November 7, 1993
The House voted resoundingly to terminate the superconducting super collider research project in Waxahachie, Tex. The death sentence was included in the Department of Energy's fiscal 1994 budget (HR 2445). The Senate later went along, and the massive construction job has been declared dead by supporters as well as foes in Congress. The super collider was envisioned to conduct high-speed proton collisions in an underground loop, yielding information on the origin of matter.
NEWS
October 28, 1993 | From Associated Press
Congress on Wednesday sent President Clinton legislation to kill the superconducting super collider, putting the death of the multibillion-dollar atom smasher a pen stroke away. By an 89-11 vote, the Senate sent the measure to the White House for Clinton's expected signature. To the chagrin of longtime supporters, the $640 million in the bill originally intended for continued construction on the huge Texas physics project was rechanneled to close out contracts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1993
Re "Super Collider is More Than Science," Commentary, Sept. 24: It is difficult for me not to be skeptical in the extreme as to the advisability of continuing with the superconducting super collider (SSC) at this particular time. Nina Byers and Roberto Peccei stated that more than $1.5 billion and a decade of work have been invested in this project. They claim further that "if the SSC is funded, it would cost less than $1 billion per year for the next 10 years"--only $10 billion! The physicists claim also that the SSC would help us to understand this issue of "mass" and "dark matter" and the interaction of "quarks and leptons."
NEWS
June 25, 1993 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The superconducting super collider smashed into fiscal and political reality Thursday when the House voted overwhelmingly to kill the $8.3-billion project as a "pure science" luxury that a nation bent on serious deficit reduction no longer can afford. The 280-141 vote cut across party lines and pitted passionate arguments for scientific research against those for deficit reduction. Voting against the giant Texas-based atom smasher were 108 Republicans, 171 Democrats and one independent.
NEWS
May 7, 1993 | MARK A. STEIN, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Running the nation's newest national laboratory keeps Roy Schwitters running. He shuttles daily between a Dallas industrial park devoted entirely to his project, the Superconducting Super Collider, and a warehouse here that is its headquarters.
BUSINESS
August 6, 1992 | MICHAEL SCHRAGE, Michael Schrage is a writer, consultant and research associate at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He writes this column independently for The Times.
Let's clear up a little $8.2-billion misunderstanding. The real reason we want to build a superconducting super-collider in Waxahachie, Tex., isn't to explore matter and energy and push back the boundaries of human knowledge; it's to boost U.S. industrial competitiveness versus Japan and Europe. "There is no question that our economic future is being harmed by a declining international competitiveness due in part to insufficient investment in basic scientific research," argues Sen.
NEWS
May 7, 1993 | MARK A. STEIN, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Running the nation's newest national laboratory keeps Roy Schwitters running. He shuttles daily between a Dallas industrial park devoted entirely to his project, the Superconducting Super Collider, and a warehouse here that is its headquarters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 1987
By all accounts, the National Academy of Sciences has done a credible job in narrowing the number of sites for the $4.4-billion superconducting super collider, and the academy's proposals should be rigorously respected. This could have been a procedure dangerously corrupted by politics. The 21 educators, scientists and industrial managers who made the study for the academy appear to have avoided issues extraneous to an objective identification of the best sites from a scientific point of view.
NEWS
August 4, 1992 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a victory for President Bush and the scientific community, the Senate Monday voted to reverse a House decision to kill the superconducting super collider and approved $550 million to continue work on the giant atom smasher now under construction in Texas. The approval came in a two-step process that reflected strong lobbying by the Bush Administration and by leading U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1992
By a vote of 232 to 181, the House voted to kill the Superconducting Super Collider project under development at Waxahachie, Tex. This removed $450 million from a fiscal 1993 appropriations bill (HR 5373), leaving $34 million for shutting down the project. The issue is now before the Senate. About $1 billion has been appropriated toward the estimated $8.3-billion final cost of the proposed 54-mile oval tunnel for breaking up atoms in high-speed collisions.
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