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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 1987
Telephone, television or computer data transmission lines made from high-temperature superconductors discovered earlier this year can carry 100 times as much information as the best optical fiber lines now in use, scientists at the University of Rochester and Cornell University in Ithaca, N.Y., said Friday. Every second, such a superconducting line could transmit 15 million voice conversations or 10,000 color television channels, said physicist Gerard Mourou of Rochester.
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SCIENCE
January 31, 2004 | K.C. Cole, Times Staff Writer
Particles come in two mostly mutually exclusive varieties: loners and lovers. Loners (fermions) keep each other at arm's length; both you and the wall are made of fermions, which explains why you can't walk through. Lovers (bosons) are so gregarious that infinite numbers can pile into any space, so your body easily pushes aside the bosons in a light beam.
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BUSINESS
December 2, 1987 | Associated Press
A new superconductor that works at relatively high temperatures can carry about 100 times more electricity than earlier versions, an important step toward practical use of these materials, researchers said Tuesday. The researchers said their discovery appears to provide major clues toward solving a problem that has stumped experts trying to fashion superconductors that can work at relatively warm temperatures to transmit large amounts of power without resistance or loss.
SCIENCE
October 8, 2003 | K.C. Cole, Times Staff Writer
The Nobel Prize was awarded Tuesday to three physicists from the U.S. and Russia who explained the bizarre behavior of materials at the extremes of cold -- phenomena that have turned out to have a wealth of practical applications. Anthony Leggett of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign developed the theory explaining a perplexing form of helium that seemed to defy known laws of physics.
BUSINESS
March 18, 1988 | From Reuters
General Electric Co. said Thursday that it succeeded for the first time in applying a film of superconducting material on silicon at temperatures high enough to make practical use possible. GE said scientists at its GE Research Center were able to coat the silicon, the basic building block of most computer chips, with material that lost all resistance to electricity at minus 310 degrees Fahrenheit, a temperature that can be obtained by using liquid nitrogen as a coolant.
BUSINESS
February 20, 2000 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Three small money-losing companies are just about the hottest stocks around because they can dramatically lower resistance to electricity and enable wireless telecommunications devices to work better and longer. The three companies, Superconductor Technologies, Conductus and Illinois Superconductor, make superconducting filters, which eliminate resistance to electricity in materials cooled to roughly 300 degrees below zero.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 1987 | Compiled from Staff and Wire Reports and
It will take a 10-year national research program in superconductors to capitalize on the commercial potential of this new technology before other nations do, a National Academy of Sciences panel said. The group recommended that the federal government proceed with plans to spend $100 million in fiscal 1988 on high-temperature superconductivity research. In addition, it said, the government could help U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
American researchers have reported an advance in the commercial production of superconductors. Paul Chu and colleagues at the University of Houston reported in the journal Nature last week that they had developed a continuous process for bulk production of an yttrium-barium-copper oxide compound capable of carrying electricity without any resistance.
NEWS
January 2, 1988 | Associated Press
Scientists at the Argonne National Laboratory have developed what they say is the world's first electrical motor based on the properties of new superconducting ceramics. The unit, called the Meissner motor, operates at 50 revolutions per minute. "It's too small for practical use and produces negligible power, but it demonstrates for the first time that these motors are possible," Roger Poeppel, an Argonne ceramics specialist, said Friday. "We're all very excited about it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 2001
A recently discovered superconductor, magnesium diboride, can easily carry large amounts of electrical current, scientists report today. The discovery could have great commercial significance. The new material was identified in January by Japanese scientists and is superconductive at the highest temperature--39 degrees Kelvin or -390 degrees F--of any metal yet known.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 2000
The promise of high-temperature superconductors developed in the early 1990s gets a boost today with the report of new versions of the materials that can carry six to 10 times as much electricity as earlier formulations of the material. German researchers report in today's Nature that they were able to produce wafers of the yttrium barium copper oxide material free of defects that previously limited current-carrying capacity.
BUSINESS
February 26, 2000 | Bloomberg News
Apparently, it'll take more than a dive in the Dow to stop this feeding frenzy: Shares of telecom-equipment maker Superconductor Technologies Inc. (ticker symbol: SCON) surged 44% on Friday after the Santa Barbara company said it plans to demonstrate a product to increase the range of cellular-telephone networks. Superconductor Tech jumped $20.63 to $67.50 on Nasdaq. The stock has risen almost 14-fold since the start of the year, although Superconductor Tech reported a loss of $1.
BUSINESS
February 20, 2000 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Three small money-losing companies are just about the hottest stocks around because they can dramatically lower resistance to electricity and enable wireless telecommunications devices to work better and longer. The three companies, Superconductor Technologies, Conductus and Illinois Superconductor, make superconducting filters, which eliminate resistance to electricity in materials cooled to roughly 300 degrees below zero.
NEWS
July 10, 1998 | K.C. COLE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
To the general disbelief of experts in the field, a University of Buffalo scientist claimed Thursday to have discovered a material that conducts electricity with "negative resistance" at room temperature. Such a miraculous material would be a quantum leap better than long-sought room temperature superconductors, which would only carry electricity friction-free, without energy loss. A negative resistance material would actually create electricity.
NEWS
December 12, 1996 | K.C. COLE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
In what some scientists are calling a potentially major breakthrough, French researchers said in a news report Wednesday that they have made a new material that carries electricity friction-free at room temperature--a long-sought discovery that could revolutionize the electric power industry. Such so-called "superconductors" normally work only at frigid temperatures, requiring expensive refrigeration systems.
NEWS
December 17, 1993 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The long-sought dream of room-temperature superconductivity will move much closer to reality today as French researchers report that they have achieved superconductivity at minus 10 degrees Fahrenheit. Superconductors, which offer no resistance to the flow of electricity, hold the promise of loss-free transmission of electricity over long distances, the development of levitating trains and more powerful motors, faster computers and a host of other applications.
NEWS
July 9, 1993 | MARK A. STEIN, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Not so long ago, Paul C.W. Chu was just another physics professor at the University of Houston, doing the things he loved. He taught for a living and gardened for fun. When he could, he would slip on a comfortable old lab coat and indulge in a little basic research. Chu still wears his lab coat most days. But almost everything else about his life has changed.
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