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NATIONAL
August 24, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Democrats moved Saturday to change the way they nominate presidential candidates and avoid a repeat of this year's primary scramble. But they shied away from substantive debate on issues such as whether to take away Iowa's and New Hampshire's jealously guarded status as the nation's first vetting grounds for presidential candidates. As a rules panel within the Democratic National Convention Committee voted unanimously to start talking about how to prevent a jammed primary schedule, party leaders sought to put off substantive, and divisive, talk on the subject until after this year's campaign.
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NATIONAL
August 24, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Democrats moved Saturday to change the way they nominate presidential candidates and avoid a repeat of this year's primary scramble. But they shied away from substantive debate on issues such as whether to take away Iowa's and New Hampshire's jealously guarded status as the nation's first vetting grounds for presidential candidates. As a rules panel within the Democratic National Convention Committee voted unanimously to start talking about how to prevent a jammed primary schedule, party leaders sought to put off substantive, and divisive, talk on the subject until after this year's campaign.
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NATIONAL
February 17, 2008 | Peter Nicholas, Times Staff Writer
John Millin, an ophthalmologist, fits people for glasses and performs cataract operations. Debbie Marquez owns a restaurant whose specialty is chicken enchiladas in creamy jalapeno sauce. Christopher Stampolis is looking for a job now that the industrial recycling company where he worked for the last decade closed. They share one bond -- late this summer, they will help choose the Democratic presidential nominee at the party's national convention in Denver.
NEWS
June 5, 2008
Obama superdelegates: An article in Wednesday's Section A about superdelegates backing Sen. Barack Obama for president reported that Rep. Maxine Waters (D-Los Angeles) did not praise Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton when Waters announced she was switching her support to Obama. Waters, in a statement, actually called Clinton an extraordinary candidate, saying, "As an outspoken advocate on issues critical to women and children, I have great admiration for Sen. Clinton and know firsthand her commitment to our country."
NEWS
March 10, 2008
Wyoming Democrats: In an article about the caucuses in Sunday's Section A, the last name of the Wyoming Democratic Party Chairman John Millin was misspelled Mullin. Also, in some editions, the article incorrectly said that nearly 500 delegates remained to be awarded in upcoming contests and a little more than 100 superdelegates remained uncommitted. In fact, about 600 delegates remain to be awarded in the upcoming contests, and about 300 superdelegates have not indicated which candidate they back.
OPINION
February 17, 2008
Re "Don't supersede voters," editorial, Feb. 14 The issue of how the Democratic Party superdelegates should vote at their convention boils down to whether they should vote based on their own conscience or interests, or for the candidate with either the most elected pledged delegates or the largest number of actual votes, which may or may not be the same candidate. There's also an issue of whether superdelegates should cast their convention vote based on the primary vote or delegate totals, or those of their respective states and districts.
OPINION
May 8, 2008
Re "Californians' wavering bodes ill for Clinton," May 5 A passage in your article encapsulates a root cause of the Democrats' unsettled electoral situation: "Steven Ybarra, a Sacramento lawyer, and Robert Rankin, a retired Carson steelworker." Who are these people, and why do they have any say in such an important issue as selecting a nominee? One presumes these are local party apparatchiks. Good for them. But to give these local precinct workers a vote equal to that of such party movers as Howard Dean, Al Gore and Ted Kennedy is both a travesty and a living tribute to every late-night comical jab at a party infatuated with the idea of giving everyone an equal voice.
NATIONAL
March 16, 2008 | From the Associated Press
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi says it would be damaging to the Democratic Party for its leaders to buck the will of national convention delegates chosen in primaries and caucuses, a declaration that gives a boost to Sen. Barack Obama. "If the votes of the superdelegates overturn what's happened in the elections, it would be harmful to the Democratic Party," Pelosi said in an interview taped for broadcast today on ABC's "This Week. " The San Francisco Democrat did not mention either Obama or his rival, Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton, by name.
OPINION
May 15, 2008
Re "Clinton wins by a landslide in W. Virginia," May 14 Hillary Rodham Clinton wins the West Virginia primary, and now people are saying that the Democratic primary contest that was over last week isn't over. Clinton's win must be making the pundits pull out their hair. But the bigger problem is what happens if neither Barack Obama nor Clinton reaches the number of pledged delegates necessary to win the nomination? And how did a party come to a situation in which the real voting may be meaningless if superdelegates are to decide the nomination?
NEWS
April 20, 1988 | United Press International
Michael S. Dukakis gained 29 Democratic National Convention delegates today with the election by House Democrats of 207 superdelegates, giving the party's presidential front-runner a small boost. With the House results, which completed selection of 250 House and Senate delegates, Massachusetts Gov. Dukakis has nearly as much support in the bloc as the three other candidates combined.
NATIONAL
June 4, 2008 | Mark Z. Barabak and Michael Finnegan, Times Staff Writers
. -- Barack Obama, a political unknown just four years ago, clinched the Democratic nomination Tuesday, winning a grueling contest against Hillary Rodham Clinton to make history as the first black candidate to lead a major-party bid for president. Obama's protracted nominating fight with Clinton ended on the final day of the primary season, as a slew of superdelegates flocked to his side even before the polls closed in Montana and South Dakota.
NATIONAL
June 4, 2008 | Michael Finnegan and Janet Hook, Times Staff Writers
The first announcement came just after dawn Tuesday: A Michigan superdelegate had pledged her support to Barack Obama. Within hours, a dozen more superdelegates followed suit. Then another dozen. By late afternoon, Obama was just eight delegates short of the 2,118 needed to capture the Democratic nomination for president.
OPINION
May 15, 2008
Re "Clinton wins by a landslide in W. Virginia," May 14 Hillary Rodham Clinton wins the West Virginia primary, and now people are saying that the Democratic primary contest that was over last week isn't over. Clinton's win must be making the pundits pull out their hair. But the bigger problem is what happens if neither Barack Obama nor Clinton reaches the number of pledged delegates necessary to win the nomination? And how did a party come to a situation in which the real voting may be meaningless if superdelegates are to decide the nomination?
NATIONAL
May 11, 2008 | Robin Abcarian, Times Staff Writer
As he closes in on the Democratic presidential nomination, Sen. Barack Obama, who has staked much of his campaign on changing the tenor of American politics, signaled that he had no objection to having voters reminded that the presumptive Republican nominee had admitted to a serious ethical breach. Also Saturday, Obama surpassed Democratic rival Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton in superdelegates, with 275 to her 271.5, according to the Associated Press.
NATIONAL
May 10, 2008 | Bob Drogin, Times Staff Writer
With deep concern etched on her face, Democratic presidential hopeful Hillary Rodham Clinton listened intently Friday morning as Jordan Kokich, a willowy 22-year-old cancer survivor, described her heart-rending history of debilitating health problems. "Jordan beat all the odds, time and time again," Clinton told a few dozen doctors and patients gathered in an outdoor courtyard of Doernbecher Children's Hospital when it was her turn to speak.
NATIONAL
May 10, 2008 | Robin Abcarian and Bob Drogin, Times Staff Writers
. -- Barack Obama and Hillary Rodham Clinton each insisted Friday that the race for the Democratic presidential nomination wasn't over, even as Obama racked up at least nine more superdelegate commitments -- including another Clinton defector. While Clinton contrasted their healthcare policies and Obama took aim at presumptive Republican nominee John McCain, media and supporters pressed the Illinois senator on whether he would ask Clinton to join his ticket and help retire her campaign debts.
NATIONAL
May 8, 2008 | Peter Wallsten and James Hohmann, Times Staff Writers
Unable to revive her presidential campaign at the polls, Hillary Rodham Clinton now envisions a road to the nomination built on disputes over Democratic Party rules and fights over delegate selections. But on Wednesday even that route looked unattainable, with some key party officials warning that they would not cooperate with Clinton's strategy.
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