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Superhero Comics

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2012 | By Laura Hudson
"Marvel Comics: The Untold Story" performs an act of what superhero comics fans might term "retcon" - or retroactive continuity - by returning to the beginning of the superhero industry and telling the tale again with a number of previously invisible heroes suddenly added to the story: the men and women who created superhero comics. Superhero comics has always been a bit of an oddball, a niche genre with a small but fiercely devoted fan base and a penchant for stories about flawed, outcast heroes who struggle not only to save the world but find their place in it. Sean Howe's book traces the byzantine histories of the colorful characters on the comics pages and in the Marvel offices, from the inception of the superhero in the 1930s through the modern era, and finds the real and the fictional equally laced with epic triumphs, tragic reversals of fortune, backstabbing and melodrama.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2014 | By Martin Tsai
"Tiger & Bunny the Movie: The Rising" puts such a radical spin on superhero comics that it almost reads as satire. The film boasts a Justice League of its own, but one reminiscent of a professional sports league complete with stars, duds, corporate sponsors, a farm system and even an ancillary television network that literally keeps score on these avengers. To recap for the "Tiger & Bunny" uninitiated, the film follows a short-lived anime television series and a 2012 movie ("The Beginning")
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2008 | David L. Ulin
It's fitting that "Omega: The Unknown" (Marvel: unpaged, $29.99), Jonathan Lethem's first foray into comics, should come with a blurb from Michael Chabon. Chabon, after all, is the only other literary novelist I can think of who has made the jump to writing superhero comics -- with "The Escapist," which grew out of his Pulitzer Prize-winning novel "The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2012 | By Laura Hudson
"Marvel Comics: The Untold Story" performs an act of what superhero comics fans might term "retcon" - or retroactive continuity - by returning to the beginning of the superhero industry and telling the tale again with a number of previously invisible heroes suddenly added to the story: the men and women who created superhero comics. Superhero comics has always been a bit of an oddball, a niche genre with a small but fiercely devoted fan base and a penchant for stories about flawed, outcast heroes who struggle not only to save the world but find their place in it. Sean Howe's book traces the byzantine histories of the colorful characters on the comics pages and in the Marvel offices, from the inception of the superhero in the 1930s through the modern era, and finds the real and the fictional equally laced with epic triumphs, tragic reversals of fortune, backstabbing and melodrama.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2014 | By Martin Tsai
"Tiger & Bunny the Movie: The Rising" puts such a radical spin on superhero comics that it almost reads as satire. The film boasts a Justice League of its own, but one reminiscent of a professional sports league complete with stars, duds, corporate sponsors, a farm system and even an ancillary television network that literally keeps score on these avengers. To recap for the "Tiger & Bunny" uninitiated, the film follows a short-lived anime television series and a 2012 movie ("The Beginning")
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2004 | Douglas Wolk
Before there was Michael Chabon's "The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay," there was the early comics industry that inspired it -- a chaotic, lawless, backstabbing mess of a business that Gerard Jones documents in "Men of Tomorrow: Geeks, Gangsters and the Birth of the Comic Book." A former comics writer who's written extensively about the relationship between children and mass media, Jones has drawn on industry lore and long-buried documents, and dug up some remarkably juicy stories about the creators of Superman, Batman, Captain America and Wonder Woman as well as the men who published the first comic books.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 1989 | CHARLES SOLOMON
King Arthur, the model of chivalric virtue, leads the valiant knights of the Table Round into battle once more. But things have changed: The Once and Future King has been transformed into a 6-foot-3 Hercules who numbers a woman, a samurai and a mutant among his vassals. And their foes consist of a horde of green-skinned aliens. Toto, I've got a feeling we're not in Tintagel anymore. And we're not. "Camelot 3000" by Mike W. Barr and Brian Bolland takes place in the not-too-distant future.
BOOKS
June 19, 2005 | Gina Misiroglu, Gina Misiroglu is the editor of "The Superhero Book: The Ultimate Encyclopedia of Comic-Book Icons and Hollywood Heroes" and the forthcoming "The Supervillain Book."
Scholars of popular culture have long analyzed the dichotomy of good and evil in comic books. Readers have embraced the tension between good and evil so much that superhero comics have been called the new mythology for the 21st century.
BUSINESS
August 23, 2011 | By Ben Fritz and Geoff Boucher, Los Angeles Times
DC Comics co-publisher Dan DiDio was at a comic-book store in New Jersey when he noticed something alarming. Over the course of an hour, only two customers came in. And, this was a Saturday — the busiest day of the week for most retailers. "The walk-in, casual fans have gotten away from us," DiDio observed. "We are down to just the die-hard buyers. " Comic-book stores have become increasingly barren, with sales dropping consistently over the last three years and down an additional 7% so far in 2011.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 1990 | MIKE WYMA
Frank Balkin, a USC graduate and aspiring screenwriter, was browsing in a bookstore on a recent afternoon. He leafed through one selection after another, approving of the sophisticated characters and the diversity of subjects, even though these were comic books. "There are comics aimed at women," he said. "There are comics aimed at 35-year-old men. Hopefully someday we'll have comics aimed at senior citizens." Balkin, 22, had himself in mind when he expressed that hope.
BUSINESS
August 23, 2011 | By Ben Fritz and Geoff Boucher, Los Angeles Times
DC Comics co-publisher Dan DiDio was at a comic-book store in New Jersey when he noticed something alarming. Over the course of an hour, only two customers came in. And, this was a Saturday — the busiest day of the week for most retailers. "The walk-in, casual fans have gotten away from us," DiDio observed. "We are down to just the die-hard buyers. " Comic-book stores have become increasingly barren, with sales dropping consistently over the last three years and down an additional 7% so far in 2011.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2008 | David L. Ulin
It's fitting that "Omega: The Unknown" (Marvel: unpaged, $29.99), Jonathan Lethem's first foray into comics, should come with a blurb from Michael Chabon. Chabon, after all, is the only other literary novelist I can think of who has made the jump to writing superhero comics -- with "The Escapist," which grew out of his Pulitzer Prize-winning novel "The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay."
BOOKS
June 19, 2005 | Gina Misiroglu, Gina Misiroglu is the editor of "The Superhero Book: The Ultimate Encyclopedia of Comic-Book Icons and Hollywood Heroes" and the forthcoming "The Supervillain Book."
Scholars of popular culture have long analyzed the dichotomy of good and evil in comic books. Readers have embraced the tension between good and evil so much that superhero comics have been called the new mythology for the 21st century.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2004 | Douglas Wolk
Before there was Michael Chabon's "The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay," there was the early comics industry that inspired it -- a chaotic, lawless, backstabbing mess of a business that Gerard Jones documents in "Men of Tomorrow: Geeks, Gangsters and the Birth of the Comic Book." A former comics writer who's written extensively about the relationship between children and mass media, Jones has drawn on industry lore and long-buried documents, and dug up some remarkably juicy stories about the creators of Superman, Batman, Captain America and Wonder Woman as well as the men who published the first comic books.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 1991 | KEVIN BRASS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Though the San Diego Comic Convention is at the Convention Center, Brother Man isn't there. The Dictator of Discipline and his creators instead are at a promotional event in New Jersey, where they believe they will find more acceptance for an independent comic book that features a black super-hero than they would at a mainstream comic convention.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 1990 | MIKE WYMA
Frank Balkin, a USC graduate and aspiring screenwriter, was browsing in a bookstore on a recent afternoon. He leafed through one selection after another, approving of the sophisticated characters and the diversity of subjects, even though these were comic books. "There are comics aimed at women," he said. "There are comics aimed at 35-year-old men. Hopefully someday we'll have comics aimed at senior citizens." Balkin, 22, had himself in mind when he expressed that hope.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 1991 | KEVIN BRASS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Though the San Diego Comic Convention is at the Convention Center, Brother Man isn't there. The Dictator of Discipline and his creators instead are at a promotional event in New Jersey, where they believe they will find more acceptance for an independent comic book that features a black super-hero than they would at a mainstream comic convention.
NEWS
May 17, 1998
California's fourth-graders tie for last, with Louisiana, in reading. Eighth-graders lag a full year behind in science. Half the high school graduates need remedial help when they enter state colleges. Even the children of college graduates trail their counterparts across the country. California's classrooms contain 45% of the nation's immigrant students and hundreds of thousands living in poverty. Yet more than 31,000 of the state's teachers lack full credentials.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 1989 | CHARLES SOLOMON
King Arthur, the model of chivalric virtue, leads the valiant knights of the Table Round into battle once more. But things have changed: The Once and Future King has been transformed into a 6-foot-3 Hercules who numbers a woman, a samurai and a mutant among his vassals. And their foes consist of a horde of green-skinned aliens. Toto, I've got a feeling we're not in Tintagel anymore. And we're not. "Camelot 3000" by Mike W. Barr and Brian Bolland takes place in the not-too-distant future.
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