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Superman The Escape

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BUSINESS
March 29, 1996 | Marla Dickerson
Looks like 1996 is shaping up to be a twisted year indeed. That's because more than 50 new roller coasters are set to open in amusement parks worldwide, leading white-knuckle enthusiasts to declare 1996 the International Year of the Roller Coaster. One of the most terrifying new offerings--Superman The Escape--is scheduled for a late May launch at Six Flags Magic Mountain in Valencia.
NEWS
October 19, 2010 | By Brady MacDonald, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
The Superman coaster at Six Flags Magic Mountain will get a makeover in spring 2011 that will send riders rocketing 100 mph straight up into the air -- backwards. Superman: Escape from Krypton will add new coaster trains that run backward instead of forward, as they have since the $20-million magnetic launch shuttle coaster opened in 1997 at the Valencia amusement park. After the ride operates for a few months, one of the cars on the twin tracks will be turned around to run forward, allowing riders to choose between both options, amusement park officials said.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 1996
The new Superman--The Escape ride under construction at Magic Mountain should be inaugurated by world land-speed demon Craig Breedlove, who's still at the speed thing after 30 years. According to David Wharton's feature ("Creating a Monster," May 19), the ride accelerates passengers on a horizontal track and then sends them up a tower that looks as tall as City Hall for six seconds of weightlessness. The article was confused about the propulsion technology. If, as it suggests, the ride is propelled by linear induction motors, then it is the first train in California to employ the technology under development in Japan, Germany and elsewhere to propel high-speed trains.
BUSINESS
July 2, 1998 | E. SCOTT RECKARD, E. Scott Reckard covers tourism for The Times. He can be reached at (714) 966-7407 and at scott.reckard@latimes.com
Orange County is famous for its plunge into bankruptcy, for native son Richard M. Nixon, who plunged from the presidency into Watergate disgrace, and for Disneyland. So if you think about it, it's fitting that the county's tallest structure is a 300-foot Knott's Berry Farm ride that plunges thrill-seekers 30 stories straight down. Descent time: about three seconds. Top speed: more than 50 mph.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 2004 | From a Times Staff Writer
Knott's Berry Farm reopened its Xcelerator roller coaster over the weekend with enhanced safety features on the restraint system, park officials said. The ride had been closed since earlier this month after state safety inspectors asked the park to improve the design of a T-shaped lap bar. A similar lap bar made by Switzerland-based manufacturer Intamin AG has been the focus of two recent out-of-state fatal accidents.
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