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BUSINESS
May 17, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
British media baron Robert Maxwell said Wednesday that his Mirror Group Newspapers Ltd. has agreed to buy the gossipy tabloids Globe, National Examiner and Sun in the latest ownership shakeup among the publishers of magazines sold mainly in grocery checkout aisles. The value of the transaction was not disclosed. Maxwell said he hoped to complete the purchase from Globe International Publishing Inc. by mid-June.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1998
Re the press conference of President Clinton and British Prime Minister Tony Blair on Feb. 6: It was disgusting to watch the members of the press attack the president by asking personal questions pertaining to the "sex scandal" in front of another head of state. It was utterly disrespectful of the American presidency and of the distinguished foreign guest, and it had nothing to do with topics discussed by the two statesmen. It is distressing enough that the American media (with rare exceptions)
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MAGAZINE
March 18, 1990
"Pure Gore" was pure glop. I waded into this profile hoping to gain some new substantive insights into Vidal's inimitable wit and intellect. Instead, what came out was preciously written, titillating swill worthy of supermarket tabloids. Next time you run a feature like this, don't send a girl to do a woman's job. ED MITCHELL, Los Angeles
BUSINESS
September 6, 1997 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It doesn't take a tabloid basher like actor George Clooney or Hollywood icon Elizabeth Taylor to shake things up at the nation's scandal sheets. Something simpler will do: the recognition that a lot fewer people are buying them to read about Jacko's shenanigans, JFK Jr.'s alleged marital problems or an ice cream-eating chimpanzee than did just a few years ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 1989
Come on, L.A. Times! An article on Wade Boggs-Margo Adams on the front page as actual news? He's just another boy in the fraternity of sports players, politicians and clergymen caught cheating on his wife. She's just another opportunist using sex as a springboard to plastic surgery, a pictorial in Penthouse or Playboy, and the talk show circuit. Wise up. Leave their sleazy affairs to papers who thrive on their news--the supermarket tabloids. SUSAN KNIGHT Orange
NEWS
February 7, 1993
Re "The First Family" (Jan. 25): What a tasteless way to greet and introduce the new President's family. Most of our Presidents have included some offbeat family members during their terms--a rather normal expectation in most families. To begin an introduction with the words "potentially embarrassing" when the country in general is trying to be optimistic about the future of a new Administration exhibits a style better left to the supermarket tabloids. NANCY FRIEDMAN Mission Viejo
SPORTS
August 24, 1996
The Aug. 20 article trumpeting Justin Huish's prior arrest put your paper squarely in the ranks of the supermarket tabloids. The L.A. Times is now willing to publish derogatory information about any prominent individual's past, primarily for its titillation value. This trashy article (which took two reporters to write) could have been the story of a young athlete who righted himself and acquired the maturity and focus to become an Olympic champion. Instead, The Times took the low road of sensationalism.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1998
Re the press conference of President Clinton and British Prime Minister Tony Blair on Feb. 6: It was disgusting to watch the members of the press attack the president by asking personal questions pertaining to the "sex scandal" in front of another head of state. It was utterly disrespectful of the American presidency and of the distinguished foreign guest, and it had nothing to do with topics discussed by the two statesmen. It is distressing enough that the American media (with rare exceptions)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 1986 | DON WALLER
"UN'SUNG STORIES." Phil Alvin. Slash. Before there were CDs, LPs, 78s, wax cylinders or even a sheet-music publishing industry, there were songs. Oftimes they told stories, either of events recent or long-remembered: storms, train wrecks, murders committed for love or money. In other words, the stuff that people have always talked about.
BUSINESS
September 6, 1997 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It doesn't take a tabloid basher like actor George Clooney or Hollywood icon Elizabeth Taylor to shake things up at the nation's scandal sheets. Something simpler will do: the recognition that a lot fewer people are buying them to read about Jacko's shenanigans, JFK Jr.'s alleged marital problems or an ice cream-eating chimpanzee than did just a few years ago.
NEWS
September 4, 1996 | ROY RIVENBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The professional hand-wringers are back. Every couple of years or so--when the mainstream media follow a story that first appeared in a supermarket tabloid like the National Enquirer or the Star--the tsk-tsking begins. In 1992, the outcry was over Gennifer Flowers' claims of an affair with Bill Clinton. After that it was the National Enquirer's scoops on the O.J. Simpson case. And now, it's the Star's expose of Clinton confidant Dick Morris' alleged kinky trysts with a $200-an-hour hooker.
SPORTS
August 24, 1996
The Aug. 20 article trumpeting Justin Huish's prior arrest put your paper squarely in the ranks of the supermarket tabloids. The L.A. Times is now willing to publish derogatory information about any prominent individual's past, primarily for its titillation value. This trashy article (which took two reporters to write) could have been the story of a young athlete who righted himself and acquired the maturity and focus to become an Olympic champion. Instead, The Times took the low road of sensationalism.
NEWS
May 21, 1995 | ARLENE LEVINSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Readers of The Spotlight, a fear-mongering tabloid look-alike, were treated last September to a report describing Soviet-made tanks spotted on U.S. highways and railroads. "American Citizens Want to Know . . . IS OUR TOWN NEXT? Why Are Strange Military Maneuvers Taking Place All Over America?" the headline screamed. The Spotlight never named an enemy. It never stated the presumed purpose of tanks and other vehicles shown in photographs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 1994 | BILL BOYARSKY
In the Criminal Courts Building pressroom the other day, a few of the reporters were saying they had begun buying the supermarket tabloids for information and insights into the O.J. Simpson murder case. The reporters, who worked for traditional newspapers and wire services, were embarrassed to admit they were purchasing the Star, the Globe, the National Enquirer, the National Examiner and the rest. One said she put the papers under the groceries in the shopping cart before leaving the store.
NEWS
February 7, 1993
Re "The First Family" (Jan. 25): What a tasteless way to greet and introduce the new President's family. Most of our Presidents have included some offbeat family members during their terms--a rather normal expectation in most families. To begin an introduction with the words "potentially embarrassing" when the country in general is trying to be optimistic about the future of a new Administration exhibits a style better left to the supermarket tabloids. NANCY FRIEDMAN Mission Viejo
BUSINESS
May 17, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
British media baron Robert Maxwell said Wednesday that his Mirror Group Newspapers Ltd. has agreed to buy the gossipy tabloids Globe, National Examiner and Sun in the latest ownership shakeup among the publishers of magazines sold mainly in grocery checkout aisles. The value of the transaction was not disclosed. Maxwell said he hoped to complete the purchase from Globe International Publishing Inc. by mid-June.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 1994 | BILL BOYARSKY
In the Criminal Courts Building pressroom the other day, a few of the reporters were saying they had begun buying the supermarket tabloids for information and insights into the O.J. Simpson murder case. The reporters, who worked for traditional newspapers and wire services, were embarrassed to admit they were purchasing the Star, the Globe, the National Enquirer, the National Examiner and the rest. One said she put the papers under the groceries in the shopping cart before leaving the store.
NEWS
September 4, 1996 | ROY RIVENBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The professional hand-wringers are back. Every couple of years or so--when the mainstream media follow a story that first appeared in a supermarket tabloid like the National Enquirer or the Star--the tsk-tsking begins. In 1992, the outcry was over Gennifer Flowers' claims of an affair with Bill Clinton. After that it was the National Enquirer's scoops on the O.J. Simpson case. And now, it's the Star's expose of Clinton confidant Dick Morris' alleged kinky trysts with a $200-an-hour hooker.
MAGAZINE
March 18, 1990
"Pure Gore" was pure glop. I waded into this profile hoping to gain some new substantive insights into Vidal's inimitable wit and intellect. Instead, what came out was preciously written, titillating swill worthy of supermarket tabloids. Next time you run a feature like this, don't send a girl to do a woman's job. ED MITCHELL, Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 1989
Come on, L.A. Times! An article on Wade Boggs-Margo Adams on the front page as actual news? He's just another boy in the fraternity of sports players, politicians and clergymen caught cheating on his wife. She's just another opportunist using sex as a springboard to plastic surgery, a pictorial in Penthouse or Playboy, and the talk show circuit. Wise up. Leave their sleazy affairs to papers who thrive on their news--the supermarket tabloids. SUSAN KNIGHT Orange
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