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NATIONAL
May 19, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
The federal prison dubbed the nation's most secure has dangerously low staffing levels, making it more difficult to guard notorious criminals such as Sept. 11 conspirator Zacarias Moussaoui and Unabomber Ted Kaczynski, a union representing its guards said. The Supermax prison, 90 miles southwest of Denver, opened in 1994 with a staff of 220 that has now dwindled to 185, the union said. The prison houses about 400 of the nation's most violent and disruptive inmates.
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NEWS
May 23, 2012 | By Sandra Hernandez
It seems that Theodore Kaczynski, better known as the Unabomber, couldn't pass up the opportunity to let his former classmates at Harvard College know just what he's up to these days. Associated Press reported that in an alumni directory, Kaczynski lists his occupation as "prisoner" and under awards lists "eight life sentences. " He is indeed serving a life sentence at the supermax prison in Florence, Colo., for killing three people during his bombing spree in which he mailed bombs to universities around the nation.
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OPINION
January 23, 2008
Re "Too harsh," editorial, Jan. 16 Your editorial rightfully characterized sentencing youths to life without parole as cruel and unusual punishment. It did not answer the question of how many of them end up in prolonged solitary confinement in a "supermax" prison. The larger question of conscience is the use of such prisons for any but the most dangerous prisoners guilty of the most heinous crimes. Such confinement must be judged cruel and unusual punishment, and allowing it to continue will someday be viewed as the national shame it is. We have lost our own humanity when we allow fear and vengeance to bring us to treat our fellow humans without humanity.
OPINION
February 19, 2011
It was supposed to be one of President Obama's priorities. But the closing of the Guantanamo Bay detention center has been delayed ? if not rendered impossible ? by congressional opposition in which the president unfortunately has acquiesced. This week the administration itself seemed to erect another barrier to closure when CIA Director Leon E. Panetta said that, if captured, Osama bin Laden and his lieutenant, Ayman Zawahiri, probably would be held at Guantanamo, perhaps after questioning at the U.S. air base at Bagram, Afghanistan.
OPINION
September 17, 2006
Re "L.A. Dope Peddler Catches a Big Break," column, Sept. 14 The district attorney, the police chief, the mayor, the sheriff, county supervisors and judges can yell at each other all they want, but it won't change the fact that the jails are full. Shall we build more jails? Evidently, incarceration doesn't slow down the drug dealers, even those housed in Colorado's "Supermax" prison ("Drug Web Reportedly Spun in Cell," Sept. 13). Perhaps it's time to consider some rational alternatives, such as treating these drugs the same way we treat aspirin, caffeine, nicotine, alcohol and other federally blessed drugs, i.e. with Food and Drug Administration safety standards, taxation and public education.
NEWS
May 23, 2012 | By Sandra Hernandez
It seems that Theodore Kaczynski, better known as the Unabomber, couldn't pass up the opportunity to let his former classmates at Harvard College know just what he's up to these days. Associated Press reported that in an alumni directory, Kaczynski lists his occupation as "prisoner" and under awards lists "eight life sentences. " He is indeed serving a life sentence at the supermax prison in Florence, Colo., for killing three people during his bombing spree in which he mailed bombs to universities around the nation.
OPINION
February 19, 2011
It was supposed to be one of President Obama's priorities. But the closing of the Guantanamo Bay detention center has been delayed ? if not rendered impossible ? by congressional opposition in which the president unfortunately has acquiesced. This week the administration itself seemed to erect another barrier to closure when CIA Director Leon E. Panetta said that, if captured, Osama bin Laden and his lieutenant, Ayman Zawahiri, probably would be held at Guantanamo, perhaps after questioning at the U.S. air base at Bagram, Afghanistan.
NATIONAL
May 5, 2006 | Richard A. Serrano, Times Staff Writer
Halfway through the trial, prison expert James E. Aiken looked straight at jurors and told them what Zacarias Moussaoui could expect if they sent him away for the rest of his life. "I have seen them rot," he said. "They rot." Aiken was describing what happens to the nation's highest-risk prisoners after they settle in at the federal government's maximum-security prison in Florence, Colo., known as Supermax.
NATIONAL
June 6, 2006 | Richard A. Serrano, Times Staff Writer
Richard Lee McNair's job in the prison factory was mending U.S. mailbags. Thousands of the leather pouches were routinely delivered to the shop at the federal maximum-security penitentiary here, and the middle-aged convict worked quietly each day, helping to stitch them back up. Once the bags were refurbished, they were stacked on pallets, hundreds in a pile. McNair watched for four months as forklifts scooped up the pallets and hauled them to a warehouse just outside the prison walls.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1998 | STEVE J. MARTIN, Steve J. Martin is a former general counsel and chief of staff to the director of the Texas prison system. Now a private attorney, he is serving as a court monitor in an excessive use of force case involving a facility at Riker's Island, New York City. He is co-author of "Texas Prisons: The Walls Came Tumbling Down" (Texas Monthly Press, 1987)
In framing a government which is to be administered by men over men," James Madison wrote, "the great difficulty lies in this: You must first enable the government to control the governed; in the next place oblige it to control itself." As the public has become accustomed to the idea that "super predators" must be kept in "super-max prisons" in a "no frills" environment, the use of lethal force at the two California super-max prisons, Corcoran and Pelican Bay, has risen to extraordinary heights.
NATIONAL
June 4, 2009 | Nicholas Riccardi
Like many folks in this tranquil town, Patty Liberty has no problem living just down the road from some of the world's most notorious terrorists. Zacarias Moussaoui, known as "the 20th hijacker" for his attempts to join in the Sept. 11 attacks, resides at the supermax prison just outside the city limits. So do would-be shoe bomber Richard Reid and Ramzi Yousef, who tried to blow up the World Trade Center in 1993. Unabomber Theodore Kaczynski lives there too.
OPINION
January 23, 2008
Re "Too harsh," editorial, Jan. 16 Your editorial rightfully characterized sentencing youths to life without parole as cruel and unusual punishment. It did not answer the question of how many of them end up in prolonged solitary confinement in a "supermax" prison. The larger question of conscience is the use of such prisons for any but the most dangerous prisoners guilty of the most heinous crimes. Such confinement must be judged cruel and unusual punishment, and allowing it to continue will someday be viewed as the national shame it is. We have lost our own humanity when we allow fear and vengeance to bring us to treat our fellow humans without humanity.
OPINION
September 17, 2006
Re "L.A. Dope Peddler Catches a Big Break," column, Sept. 14 The district attorney, the police chief, the mayor, the sheriff, county supervisors and judges can yell at each other all they want, but it won't change the fact that the jails are full. Shall we build more jails? Evidently, incarceration doesn't slow down the drug dealers, even those housed in Colorado's "Supermax" prison ("Drug Web Reportedly Spun in Cell," Sept. 13). Perhaps it's time to consider some rational alternatives, such as treating these drugs the same way we treat aspirin, caffeine, nicotine, alcohol and other federally blessed drugs, i.e. with Food and Drug Administration safety standards, taxation and public education.
NATIONAL
June 6, 2006 | Richard A. Serrano, Times Staff Writer
Richard Lee McNair's job in the prison factory was mending U.S. mailbags. Thousands of the leather pouches were routinely delivered to the shop at the federal maximum-security penitentiary here, and the middle-aged convict worked quietly each day, helping to stitch them back up. Once the bags were refurbished, they were stacked on pallets, hundreds in a pile. McNair watched for four months as forklifts scooped up the pallets and hauled them to a warehouse just outside the prison walls.
NATIONAL
May 19, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
The federal prison dubbed the nation's most secure has dangerously low staffing levels, making it more difficult to guard notorious criminals such as Sept. 11 conspirator Zacarias Moussaoui and Unabomber Ted Kaczynski, a union representing its guards said. The Supermax prison, 90 miles southwest of Denver, opened in 1994 with a staff of 220 that has now dwindled to 185, the union said. The prison houses about 400 of the nation's most violent and disruptive inmates.
NATIONAL
May 5, 2006 | Richard A. Serrano, Times Staff Writer
Halfway through the trial, prison expert James E. Aiken looked straight at jurors and told them what Zacarias Moussaoui could expect if they sent him away for the rest of his life. "I have seen them rot," he said. "They rot." Aiken was describing what happens to the nation's highest-risk prisoners after they settle in at the federal government's maximum-security prison in Florence, Colo., known as Supermax.
NATIONAL
June 4, 2009 | Nicholas Riccardi
Like many folks in this tranquil town, Patty Liberty has no problem living just down the road from some of the world's most notorious terrorists. Zacarias Moussaoui, known as "the 20th hijacker" for his attempts to join in the Sept. 11 attacks, resides at the supermax prison just outside the city limits. So do would-be shoe bomber Richard Reid and Ramzi Yousef, who tried to blow up the World Trade Center in 1993. Unabomber Theodore Kaczynski lives there too.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 2006 | Christopher Goffard, Times Staff Writer
Due to a production error part of the following story was omitted from some editions of Saturday's paper. It is reprinted in its entirely below. * Two kingpins of the Aryan Brotherhood were convicted of racketeering and murder Friday, capping a five-month trial aimed at crushing one of the nation's most fearsome, far-flung prison gangs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1998 | STEVE J. MARTIN, Steve J. Martin is a former general counsel and chief of staff to the director of the Texas prison system. Now a private attorney, he is serving as a court monitor in an excessive use of force case involving a facility at Riker's Island, New York City. He is co-author of "Texas Prisons: The Walls Came Tumbling Down" (Texas Monthly Press, 1987)
In framing a government which is to be administered by men over men," James Madison wrote, "the great difficulty lies in this: You must first enable the government to control the governed; in the next place oblige it to control itself." As the public has become accustomed to the idea that "super predators" must be kept in "super-max prisons" in a "no frills" environment, the use of lethal force at the two California super-max prisons, Corcoran and Pelican Bay, has risen to extraordinary heights.
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