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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 2013 | By Samantha Schaefer
Locals watch the so-called supermoon on June 23 as it rises and brightens up the Los Angeles skyline. John Megliorino shot this photo of the scene from a view spot on Mulholland Drive in the Hollywood Hills. Megliorino said he originally planned to photograph the moon, but the haze prevented it from being viewed at its largest size. "When it did come out people were very excited to see it and enjoyed viewing the moon in all its brightness," he said. Each week, we're featuring photos of Southern California submitted by readers.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 2013 | By Samantha Schaefer
Locals watch the so-called supermoon on June 23 as it rises and brightens up the Los Angeles skyline. John Megliorino shot this photo of the scene from a view spot on Mulholland Drive in the Hollywood Hills. Megliorino said he originally planned to photograph the moon, but the haze prevented it from being viewed at its largest size. "When it did come out people were very excited to see it and enjoyed viewing the moon in all its brightness," he said. Each week, we're featuring photos of Southern California submitted by readers.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 2013 | From a Times Staff Writer
The Supermoon put on quite a show Saturday night in Southern California -- and it had many reaching for their cameras. The so-called supermoon will reach its closest distance to the Earth at exactly 4:32 a.m. PDT Sunday, but both Saturday evening and Sunday morning will offer good opportunities to observe the spectacle, according to NASA. The supermoon will be up to 14% larger and 30% brighter than a typical full moon.   Here are some of the images aggregated from social media:   Goodnight, #Supermoon . #solstice #california (that's the moon at dusk.)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 2013 | From a Times Staff Writer
Images of Saturday night's Supermoon filled social-media sites such as Twitter and Instagram last night. One person captured this panoramic video of the moon over the L.A. skyline from Griffith Park. Here's another video of the Supermoon vying for attention with a police helicopter. Here was the view from Orange County: Here are some images aggregated from social media: Super Moon over the Los Angeles Skyline. #YoureWelcome pic.twitter.com/gOCBaTY23k - David (@MrPolitico45)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
The largest and brightest full moon of 2013 will light up the sky this weekend when it passes the closest point to the Earth in its elliptical orbit. The so-called supermoon will reach its closest distance to the Earth at exactly 4:32 a.m. PDT Sunday, but both Saturday night and Sunday morning will offer good opportunities to observe the spectacle, according to NASA. The supermoon will be up to 14% larger and 30% brighter than a typical full moon. When the moon reaches its perigee, it will be just 221,824 miles away from Earth -- or 16,176 miles closer than usual.
NEWS
June 22, 2013 | By Rene Lynch
Supermoon 2013 is here, one of the most anticipated astronomical happenings of the year, when we'll turn to the skies and see the biggest, fullest and brightest moon of the year. You know what that means, right? Time for a moonlit picnic. Our sister blog, Science Now , tells us that you don't have to do anything special to see the fullest moon of the year. Just look up into the sky and Supermoon 2013 will be there. That means you can keep your focus on putting together a picnic basket and finding a place where, ideally, you can get away from city lights for the best viewing options.
SCIENCE
June 21, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
It's supermoon time. Look to the sky this weekend to see the biggest, fullest and brightest moon of 2013. The supermoon is the largest full moon of the year. On Sunday at 4:32 a.m. PDT the moon will be at its most full, just 22 minutes after it passes the closest point to the Earth in its eliptical orbit around our planet. The average distance of the moon from the Earth is 238,000 miles. On Sunday morning, it will be just 221,824 miles away -- or 16,176 miles closer than usual.
NEWS
March 18, 2011 | By Tami Dennis, Tribune Health
If a full moon affects the human body, then a supermoon surely would send those effects into overdrive, leading to even more pregnancies, epileptic seizures, surgery screw-ups, suicides, assaults and various other types of biological havoc. Surely, it would. The operative word, of course, is "if. " And the Skeptic's Dictionary begins a nice distillation of moon-related folklore this way: "The full moon has been linked to crime, suicide, mental illness, disasters, accidents,  birthrates, fertility, and werewolves, among other things.
NEWS
May 8, 2012 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
While some of us were hunting for a good, dark spot to gaze at the biggest moon of the year on Saturday, Jarrod Lyman headed over to Yosemite National Park where he captured something other than the moon with his camera: a moonbow. Lyman, who works for the Yosemite Sierra Visitors Bureau in Oakhurst, Calif., said via e-mail there were "tripods and cameras everywhere taking advantage of the conditions. "  His photograph shows Yosemite Falls with a moonbow emerging from the mist of its waters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 2013 | From a Times Staff Writer
Images of Saturday night's Supermoon filled social-media sites such as Twitter and Instagram last night. One person captured this panoramic video of the moon over the L.A. skyline from Griffith Park. Here's another video of the Supermoon vying for attention with a police helicopter. Here was the view from Orange County: Here are some images aggregated from social media: Super Moon over the Los Angeles Skyline. #YoureWelcome pic.twitter.com/gOCBaTY23k - David (@MrPolitico45)
NEWS
June 22, 2013 | By Rene Lynch
Supermoon 2013 is here, one of the most anticipated astronomical happenings of the year, when we'll turn to the skies and see the biggest, fullest and brightest moon of the year. You know what that means, right? Time for a moonlit picnic. Our sister blog, Science Now , tells us that you don't have to do anything special to see the fullest moon of the year. Just look up into the sky and Supermoon 2013 will be there. That means you can keep your focus on putting together a picnic basket and finding a place where, ideally, you can get away from city lights for the best viewing options.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 2013 | From a Times Staff Writer
The Supermoon put on quite a show Saturday night in Southern California -- and it had many reaching for their cameras. The so-called supermoon will reach its closest distance to the Earth at exactly 4:32 a.m. PDT Sunday, but both Saturday evening and Sunday morning will offer good opportunities to observe the spectacle, according to NASA. The supermoon will be up to 14% larger and 30% brighter than a typical full moon.   Here are some of the images aggregated from social media:   Goodnight, #Supermoon . #solstice #california (that's the moon at dusk.)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
The largest and brightest full moon of 2013 will light up the sky this weekend when it passes the closest point to the Earth in its elliptical orbit. The so-called supermoon will reach its closest distance to the Earth at exactly 4:32 a.m. PDT Sunday, but both Saturday night and Sunday morning will offer good opportunities to observe the spectacle, according to NASA. The supermoon will be up to 14% larger and 30% brighter than a typical full moon. When the moon reaches its perigee, it will be just 221,824 miles away from Earth -- or 16,176 miles closer than usual.
SCIENCE
June 21, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
It's supermoon time. Look to the sky this weekend to see the biggest, fullest and brightest moon of 2013. The supermoon is the largest full moon of the year. On Sunday at 4:32 a.m. PDT the moon will be at its most full, just 22 minutes after it passes the closest point to the Earth in its eliptical orbit around our planet. The average distance of the moon from the Earth is 238,000 miles. On Sunday morning, it will be just 221,824 miles away -- or 16,176 miles closer than usual.
NEWS
May 8, 2012 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
While some of us were hunting for a good, dark spot to gaze at the biggest moon of the year on Saturday, Jarrod Lyman headed over to Yosemite National Park where he captured something other than the moon with his camera: a moonbow. Lyman, who works for the Yosemite Sierra Visitors Bureau in Oakhurst, Calif., said via e-mail there were "tripods and cameras everywhere taking advantage of the conditions. "  His photograph shows Yosemite Falls with a moonbow emerging from the mist of its waters.
NEWS
March 18, 2011 | By Tami Dennis, Tribune Health
If a full moon affects the human body, then a supermoon surely would send those effects into overdrive, leading to even more pregnancies, epileptic seizures, surgery screw-ups, suicides, assaults and various other types of biological havoc. Surely, it would. The operative word, of course, is "if. " And the Skeptic's Dictionary begins a nice distillation of moon-related folklore this way: "The full moon has been linked to crime, suicide, mental illness, disasters, accidents,  birthrates, fertility, and werewolves, among other things.
NEWS
May 3, 2012 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
The largest full moon of 2012 happens this Saturday, but it's OK if you don't really notice. The moon doesn't really get bigger, it just gets closer to Earth (but you knew that). At 8:40 p.m. Pacific Time on Saturday, according to the Griffith Observatory Sky Report , the moon will be at its closest point in its orbit to the Earth this year. (Accounting for the time zone difference, European moon-watchers will see it Sunday.) To be precise, Earth and moon will be just 221,801 miles apart -- more than 17,000 miles closer than average.
NATIONAL
March 19, 2011 | Stephen Ceasar
As the sun sets in the west Saturday, the biggest, brightest moon in about 20 years will begin peeking over the eastern horizon. The so-called "supermoon" will appear about 14% bigger and 30% brighter than normal, according to NASA. Because the moon's orbit is oval, there is a point where it is the closest to the Earth, known as its perigee. The farthest point is its apogee. On Saturday, the moon's closest perigee of the year happens to occur within one hour of the monthly astronomical phase of the full moon, which together will create the rarely seen spectacle of illumination and size, said Geoff Chester, an astronomer at the U.S. Naval Observatory in Washington.
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