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ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2001 | MARK SWED, Mark Swed is The Times' music critic
Opera's numbers are up. There are more opera companies and more opera performances than ever. Curiously, however, there are not more opera superstars, the kind who are worshiped by canary fanciers and who, through a combination of voice and personality, are household names. Despite a decent quantity of conventional stars (Renee Fleming, for example), there are really only three singers who fit the supernova description--Cecilia Bartoli, Placido Domingo and Andrea Bocelli.
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SPORTS
June 14, 2000 | GRAHAME L. JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sigi Schmid showed commendable restraint Tuesday, but don't expect the Galaxy to do the same tonight. Tempted by an array of Italian dishes during a luncheon in Pasadena, the Galaxy coach settled instead on a simple pasta. He even declined dessert. Schmid's Galaxy team expects to feast a little better tonight. Los Angeles' opponent in the Lamar Hunt U.S. Open Cup is the Seattle Sounders of the A-League. On paper, at least, the Galaxy should make a meal of them.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2000 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Supernova" isn't so super, which is no doubt why MGM opened it Friday without early press previews. Despite the distinctive presences of James Spader, Angela Bassett, Robert Forster and Lou Diamond Phillips and a great high-tech look, the film is a relentlessly routine outer-space adventure further hampered by a load of technical jargon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1999
Caltech astronomers say a burst of cosmic gamma rays--one of the most powerful explosions ever observed--probably originated in a supernova explosion and the formation of a black hole. The observation leaves astronomers more convinced that these brief but brilliant cosmic flashes are generated by the fiery collapse of massive, dying stars. The short-lived gamma ray burst occurred March 26, 1998.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 1999
Astronomers from Argentina and South Africa have provided the first direct evidence for the origin of the most common cosmic rays, atomic particles that bombard the Earth at nearly the speed of light. Earlier observations showed that cosmic ray electrons are propelled toward the Earth by supernovas, but the origin of cosmic ray protons--which outnumber electrons 10 to one--has been in doubt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 1999
Spanish astronomers have obtained the first evidence of a direct link between a supernova explosion and the formation of a black hole. Stars with masses more than about 10 times that of our sun are thought to end their lives either as a supernova or in gravitational collapse, either of which would produce a black hole. A team from the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias in the Canary Islands studied emissions from a star orbiting a black hole in the binary system Nova Scorpii 1994.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1998
Astrophysicists have found a remnant from what would have been the biggest, brightest explosion in the galaxy, a supernova that appeared in AD 1250, but there is no historical record of it ever being seen, two teams report in today's issue of the journal Nature. That is perplexing because someone, somewhere should have seen it.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1998 | MIKE BOEHM
Supernova has fallen off the wagon--the kiddie wagon, that is. The punk-pop trio from Costa Mesa pioneered the band-as-Saturday-morning-cartoon concept that the Aquabats have subsequently seized upon. Now, three years after debuting with "Ages 3 and Up," a self-explanatory CD title if ever there was one, Supernova has graduated from elementary school, where they sang about the delights of drooling, eating Oreo cookies and taking vitamins.
NEWS
February 27, 1998 | K.C. COLE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
In what may be a major insight into the nature of space itself, astronomers have discovered evidence that the universe is expanding rapidly under pressure of an anti-gravity-like force first proposed by Albert Einstein. Although he later called his proposal the worst blunder of his life, the great scientist's idea has resurfaced over the past decade as a way to solve a host of cosmological conundrums, including suggestions that the universe is younger than some of its stars.
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