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Supershuttle International Inc

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BUSINESS
June 5, 1998 | Bloomberg News
SuperShuttle International Inc., which carried more than 7 million passengers to and from airports in its bright blue and yellow vans last year, plans to sell 3.32 million shares in an initial public offering. The Phoenix-based company operates in 15 U.S. cities serving 18 airports, including Los Angeles International. It wants to build a national brand by expanding into new cities and targeting corporate customers, according to its registration with the Securities and Exchange Commission.
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BUSINESS
February 14, 2000
* Japan's current account surplus narrowed a more-than-expected 33.6% in December, as exports fell more than imports, signaling the stronger yen is eating into overseas earnings. The current account surplus narrowed to $6 billion in December, seasonally adjusted, following a 15% decline in November, the Ministry of Finance said. Economists had expected a 6% drop. From a year earlier, the surplus shrank 40%.
BUSINESS
September 19, 2001 | MARLA DICKERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tight security and more restrictions on private cars would seem a boon to the operators of airport shuttles, taxis and limousines. But with fewer passengers flying after last week's terrorist attacks, some local transportation providers said their businesses are hurting. SuperShuttle International Inc.
BUSINESS
June 11, 1998 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to pick up a financial cushion from Wall Street, van-ride operator SuperShuttle International Inc. plans to go public with a 3-million-share stock offering. Phoenix-based SuperShuttle, whose blue-and-yellow passenger vans are familiar sights on Southland freeways, provides shared rides to and from 18 airports in 15 U.S. cities, including airports in Los Angeles, Burbank, Orange County and Ontario. Nine of the cities are served by company-owned operations, and six are franchises.
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