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Supersonic Transports

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NEWS
June 1, 1994 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A sleek, needle-nosed jetliner carrying 300 passengers taxis out of Los Angeles International Airport, rolls to a hushed takeoff over Playa del Rey then accelerates above the Pacific Ocean like no commercial plane in history--reaching 2.4 times the speed of sound nearly 12 miles above the earth. The titanium airplane with a cockpit that looks like a video arcade pulls into Tokyo in just over four hours--cutting six hours off the normal trip. Getting to Asia from L.A.
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SCIENCE
September 6, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
NASA says it's found a way to soften the window-rattling impact of the sonic boom from supersonic jets: change the shape of the aircraft. Proof of that long-held theory came in a series of test runs at Edwards Air Force Base near Palmdale. Changes to the skin and nose of a Navy F-5E jet flattened out the sound it produced, dulling the sharp report of the sonic boom into a thud, according to NASA spokeswoman Kathy Barnstorff.
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BUSINESS
April 14, 2003 | Greg Schneider, The Washington Post
How will Mick Jagger even be Mick Jagger without the Concorde? In a blow to jet-setters everywhere, British Airways and Air France have announced that they will end the supersonic Concorde's commercial service in October -- closing a 27-year era in public air travel as excessive as George Hamilton's tan and as shameless as a Sylvia Kristel soft-porn movie.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 1998
Its quirky, whale-like appearance is almost in defiance of the importance the windless, black-and-white vessel will one day hold. So too are its relatively minuscule budget ad reliance on available equipment and existing technology. Despite all that, the X-38 is intended to become the emergency crew-return vehicle for the seven- astronaut- capacity International Space Station, the construction of which is scheduled to begin in space this year.
BUSINESS
October 6, 1997 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Think of the Concorde. Extreme luxury. Extreme speed. And extremely noisy. The unsettling roar of supersonic jets is one of the main reasons these machines are banned from most airports in the United States. Hoping to increase public access to supersonic transportation, scientists at UC Irvine have spent more than four years developing a way to muzzle the jet. Some of the loudest sounds come from the exhaust when a pilot revs the engines, experts said.
BUSINESS
April 10, 2001 | PETER PAE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For more than four decades, frustrated scientists have been trying to develop a jet-powered aircraft that could zip across the sky at five times the speed of sound, a formidable feat that has been harder to accomplish than sending a man to the moon.
SCIENCE
September 6, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
NASA says it's found a way to soften the window-rattling impact of the sonic boom from supersonic jets: change the shape of the aircraft. Proof of that long-held theory came in a series of test runs at Edwards Air Force Base near Palmdale. Changes to the skin and nose of a Navy F-5E jet flattened out the sound it produced, dulling the sharp report of the sonic boom into a thud, according to NASA spokeswoman Kathy Barnstorff.
BUSINESS
March 3, 1989 | RONE TEMPEST, Times Staff Writer
In a festive and sentimental moment, French and British aerospace leaders Thursday celebrated the 20th anniversary of the first test flight of the Concorde, the world's only supersonic airliner. The lavish birthday party for the jet, held in a hangar owned by the French national aerospace company, Aerospatiale, attracted the cream of European engineers and aviators.
WORLD
August 16, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
Australian researchers said an air-breathing "scramjet" engine had successfully achieved supersonic ignition in the atmosphere for the first time, reaching 7.6 times the speed of sound. Project leader Allan Paull said data analyzed from the July 30 test showed the engine, which uses oxygen in the atmosphere to ignite hydrogen fuel, had reached Mach 7.6--a speed that would allow travel from London to Sydney in two hours instead of more than 20.
BUSINESS
April 10, 2001 | PETER PAE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For more than four decades, frustrated scientists have been trying to develop a jet-powered aircraft that could zip across the sky at five times the speed of sound, a formidable feat that has been harder to accomplish than sending a man to the moon.
NEWS
February 6, 1999 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After NASA poured an estimated $1.6 billion into a risky effort to help Boeing Co. develop a revolutionary supersonic jetliner, the Seattle-based aerospace giant has decided not to build it. Officials at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration disclosed this week that they have dropped the research program from their $13.6-billion budget for fiscal 2000. Even before federal officials cut off the money supply, Boeing had slashed its involvement in the project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 1998
Its quirky, whale-like appearance is almost in defiance of the importance the windless, black-and-white vessel will one day hold. So too are its relatively minuscule budget ad reliance on available equipment and existing technology. Despite all that, the X-38 is intended to become the emergency crew-return vehicle for the seven- astronaut- capacity International Space Station, the construction of which is scheduled to begin in space this year.
BUSINESS
October 6, 1997 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Think of the Concorde. Extreme luxury. Extreme speed. And extremely noisy. The unsettling roar of supersonic jets is one of the main reasons these machines are banned from most airports in the United States. Hoping to increase public access to supersonic transportation, scientists at UC Irvine have spent more than four years developing a way to muzzle the jet. Some of the loudest sounds come from the exhaust when a pilot revs the engines, experts said.
BUSINESS
January 25, 1996 | From Reuters
The Concorde, the world's only supersonic airliner, celebrated 20 years in service this week, but it will still be around for wealthy passengers in a hurry well into the next century, British Airways said. The first commercial Concorde flight took off from London's Heathrow airport for Bahrain on Jan. 21, 1976, with a round-trip fare of about $1,015. That compares with the $8,490 that British Airways now charges for its London-to-New York service.
BUSINESS
January 25, 1996 | From Reuters
The Concorde, the world's only supersonic airliner, celebrated 20 years in service this week, but it will still be around for wealthy passengers in a hurry well into the next century, British Airways said. The first commercial Concorde flight took off from London's Heathrow airport for Bahrain on Jan. 21, 1976, with a round-trip fare of about $1,015. That compares with the $8,490 that British Airways now charges for its London-to-New York service.
WORLD
August 16, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
Australian researchers said an air-breathing "scramjet" engine had successfully achieved supersonic ignition in the atmosphere for the first time, reaching 7.6 times the speed of sound. Project leader Allan Paull said data analyzed from the July 30 test showed the engine, which uses oxygen in the atmosphere to ignite hydrogen fuel, had reached Mach 7.6--a speed that would allow travel from London to Sydney in two hours instead of more than 20.
NEWS
June 1, 1994 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A sleek, needle-nosed jetliner carrying 300 passengers taxis out of Los Angeles International Airport, rolls to a hushed takeoff over Playa del Rey then accelerates above the Pacific Ocean like no commercial plane in history--reaching 2.4 times the speed of sound nearly 12 miles above the earth. The titanium airplane with a cockpit that looks like a video arcade pulls into Tokyo in just over four hours--cutting six hours off the normal trip. Getting to Asia from L.A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 1992
A recent sighting over the Mojave Desert near Daggett by the cockpit crew of a United Airlines jumbo jet has increased speculation that the Air Force is secretly developing a new supersonic aircraft. The pilot and co-pilot of Flight 934, a Boeing 747 en route from Los Angeles to London on Aug.
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