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Superstition

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NEWS
December 29, 2000 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
College professor Nguyen Ngoc Hung had spent nearly three decades searching for the remains of his brother, who died at age 20 fighting U.S. troops. Hung had scoured battlefields in Vietnam's Central Highlands and talked to military commanders and pored through archival records, always coming up empty-handed. Finally, in desperation, he went to a psychic here and explained his grief. "This is easy," Pham Thi Hang said. "I can help."
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2012 | By Jonathan Landreth
BEIJING - Unlike Japan, where Godzilla destroyed countless Tokyo landmarks, or South Korea, where celluloid sea beasts slink around the riverbanks into Seoul, China has no creature-feature tradition because film regulators historically have shunned superstition on the silver screen. But a new film, "Bigfoot," aims to take a swipe at China's long-standing monster movie ban. The Hollywood co-production of a local legend will begin shooting in a central China nature reserve in October with help from a special-effects master who worked on "Gremlins.
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NEWS
May 18, 2003 | Audra Ang, Associated Press Writer
Hiring sorcerers. Lighting firecrackers. Following advice reputed to be from a mystical talking baby. While China's government promotes science, thousands of people are turning to superstition to fight SARS. The resort to tradition has prompted efforts by China's state press and the officially atheist communist government to discourage it.
HEALTH
October 25, 2010 | By Karen Ravn, Special to the Los Angeles Times
How would you like to see an honest-to-goodness witch flying by your place at midnight this Halloween? Just put your clothes on inside out, start walking around backward, and it'll happen. At least that's how the superstition goes. If you believe in that sort of thing. And there's a good chance that you do. Polls consistently show that about half of all Americans hold some superstitious beliefs (although not necessarily the fly-by one). Superstitions are claims of a particular type ?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 2000
It is absolutely amazing that some readers would get themselves so worked up over feng shui, which at worst is harmless, and rail at The Times for promoting "superstition" (letters, April 20). Human history has been guided in large part by the fears and superstitions promoted by organized religion. I daresay that feng shui has never been used to murder and enslave nonbelievers or to deny them basic human rights and its adherents have never had to apologize for their mistreatment of humanity, as the pope has belatedly done.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 1985 | KEVIN THOMAS
Among this weekend's offerings in UCLA's Indian Cinema retrospective is Manmohan Mahapatra's "Neeraba Jhada" ("The Silent Storm"), a beautiful, grueling film about a peasant's brave stand against a greedy landlord's determination to grab the peasant's holdings, the last bit of property in the region not in his possession.
SPORTS
June 23, 1995 | DANA HADDAD
Superstition will lead some athletes to eat the same foods every day until they lose. Some refuse to step on white lines for fear of bad luck. Nick Varvais always stays in the same motel room--with his grandmother. For the past four years, the Simi Valley tennis player has reserved Room 104 at the La Quinta Inn in Costa Mesa, three miles from the Southern California Junior Sectional tournament in Fountain Valley.
SPORTS
October 10, 1988 | MIKE PENNER, Times Staff Writer
Oakland Manager Tony La Russa hasn't changed his baseball cap since March and outlawed the word "sweep" at his family's dinner table this weekend, but insists he isn't taken by superstition. "I'm not superstitious," he said. "Just sentimental."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1996 | Dana Parsons
I'm not the superstitious type, preferring paranoia and self-deception as my main modes of reality avoidance. But today is Friday the 13th, so if only to honor tradition, I'm going nowhere near the two black cats that in recent weeks have made overtures suggesting they want to get to know me better. I don't think they're related, but who knows, it could be a setup.
NEWS
April 2, 1996 | WENDY WITHERSPOON and MARTIN HENDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Amanda Beard doesn't believe in luck. It wasn't luck, she said, that crowned her with championships in the 100- and 200-meter breaststroke at the U.S. Olympic trials in Indianapolis last month. It wasn't luck that pushed her to the wall in 2 minutes 26.25 seconds in the 200, the second-fastest time ever by an American woman. And it wasn't that teddy bear either. At the trials, 14-year-old Beard carried a teddy bear around the pool deck.
SPORTS
February 1, 2010 | By Steve Virgen
After seven seasons without an individual title on the Professional Bowlers Assn. Tour, Mike Fagan resorted to almost anything to get him over the hump. He even depended on some superstition. The 29-year-old with the boyish features and spiky hair sported an unshaven look for his final match at the One A Day Dick Weber Open on Sunday at Fountain Bowl. He didn't ditch the razor to look older, mind you. But maybe appearing mature could help. After all, he was facing Walter Ray Williams Jr., a Hall of Famer and the all-time Lumber Liquidators PBA Tour titles leader with 46. All of a sudden it wasn't about the way Fagan looked.
WORLD
August 7, 2009 | Mark Magnier
Some say it was the prayers, others the all-night vigils, still others the three days without meat or alcohol. Whatever it was that foiled the angry god, residents in this village of about 600 breathed a huge sigh of relief Thursday when the day passed without another death. "We were so scared," said Kuldeep Singh, 32, village head. "Now we feel better." Amloha has been on a knife's edge since late December when the first person died mysteriously.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2007 | Jo Perry, Special to The Times
Have you ever had an unlucky streak when everything went wrong? Then you'll sympathize with Addison Darby, the unluckiest girl at Brookside Elementary School. Sue Wilkowski tells Addison's story in "The Bad Luck Chair." Luckily, the book will be published on July 5, in time to make it your Friday the 13th book club selection. Fourth-grader Addison Darby dislikes being the center of attention.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2006 | Martin Miller, Times Staff Writer
Few spots in sports are as lonely as the batter's box. Even for an all-star such as Dodgers first baseman Nomar Garciaparra. So to elevate his comfort level, he approaches the 4-foot-by-6-foot patch of dirt with one of the oddest sets of pre-batting behaviors the national pastime has ever seen. A Garciaparra snapshot looks like this: Adjust red arm band on right arm. Tap home plate with bat. Then, quickly touch helmet bill, end of bat, then back to helmet bill.
WORLD
January 29, 2004 | Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writer
"Best to stay away from that one." That was the whispered warning about Liony Accelus when neighbors, fellow drivers on the tap-tap bus runs and even some lifelong friends concluded that the evil eye had given him AIDS. "They thought it was a voodoo spell that was making me sick," the 36-year-old father of four said of the time, just two years ago, when he weighed 105 pounds and was too weak to hold his head up.
SPORTS
October 25, 2003 | Mike Penner, Times Staff Writer
Gary Margolis will be at Santa Anita Park again today, scribbling in the margins of his Daily Racing Form, same as usual, except with maybe a slightly shakier hand and quicker pulse. Margolis has a small stake in Ten Most Wanted, one of the leading contenders in today's Breeders' Cup Classic. He says he owns about 5% of the horse, give or take. "Just say 'one of the 10 largest listed owners,' " he says, scripting his own bio blurb. "Like, the ones who get the publicity."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1995 | From Religion News Service
When Connie Palumb put her house up for sale last year, she made sure it sparkled from floor to ceiling. Then she did something even the most eagle-eyed home buyer wouldn't notice. She buried a plastic statue of St. Joseph, the patron saint of carpenters, in her yard. The house, which was marketed without a real estate agent, attracted a buyer within 10 days. "And that's unusual in this market," Palumb said.
MAGAZINE
May 22, 1988
Regarding "Superstitious L.A.," by Paul Ciotti (April 17): First, it was interesting and entertaining reading, especially for someone like myself, a psychotherapist, who deals with people's magical thinking almost every working day. Second, I'm sure I know what brought on our April showers--I washed my car. CANDIDA S. CHRISTIE Riverside
NEWS
May 18, 2003 | Audra Ang, Associated Press Writer
Hiring sorcerers. Lighting firecrackers. Following advice reputed to be from a mystical talking baby. While China's government promotes science, thousands of people are turning to superstition to fight SARS. The resort to tradition has prompted efforts by China's state press and the officially atheist communist government to discourage it.
NEWS
February 23, 2003 | Chandni Singh, Associated Press Writer
Farm laborer Jeevan dragged his kicking and screaming wife by her hair toward the priests at the temple of Guru Deoji Maharaj. Jeevan said she was possessed by evil spirits and needed to be exorcised. He was among tens of thousands of rural Indians who trekked to the monthlong exorcism fair held every year at the temple in central India, 170 miles south of Bhopal, capital of Madhya Pradesh state. Jeevan said his wife, Jagoti, had changed after they married.
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