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Superstitions

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NEWS
May 13, 1992 | ROY RIVENBURG
Some enduring childhood superstitions, compiled from interviews with kids and ex-kids and from "One Potato, Two Potato," by Mary and Herbert Knapp: * If you see a car with a burned-out headlight, say "Padiddle" and kiss someone for good luck. * Don't make funny faces at a clock striking 12, or your face will grow funny. * If you step over someone's legs and don't go back over them, you will die. Another version has it that the person stepped over is the one who dies.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2012 | By Jonathan Landreth
BEIJING - Unlike Japan, where Godzilla destroyed countless Tokyo landmarks, or South Korea, where celluloid sea beasts slink around the riverbanks into Seoul, China has no creature-feature tradition because film regulators historically have shunned superstition on the silver screen. But a new film, "Bigfoot," aims to take a swipe at China's long-standing monster movie ban. The Hollywood co-production of a local legend will begin shooting in a central China nature reserve in October with help from a special-effects master who worked on "Gremlins.
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SPORTS
November 30, 1999 | JIM HODGES
Maybe it's the pacing, which is wearing out a carpet at Staples Center. Maybe it's the "OK, Rob, give the guys a stretch." Maybe it's leaving the locker room the same way, every game. It could be Andy Murray's coaching, unless you're into the occult or looking for some sort of mystic reason for the Kings' success through their first 25 games.
HEALTH
October 25, 2010 | By Karen Ravn, Special to the Los Angeles Times
How would you like to see an honest-to-goodness witch flying by your place at midnight this Halloween? Just put your clothes on inside out, start walking around backward, and it'll happen. At least that's how the superstition goes. If you believe in that sort of thing. And there's a good chance that you do. Polls consistently show that about half of all Americans hold some superstitious beliefs (although not necessarily the fly-by one). Superstitions are claims of a particular type ?
NEWS
March 4, 1985 | DAVE LARSEN, Times Staff Writer
If you are a cross-eyed redhead who walks with a limp, better stand your ground. They don't want you out on the waves. Take it from Horace Beck, who has spent much of his life studying the lore, tales and superstitions of the sea. In fact, he has just concluded four lectures on the subject in a series sponsored by UCLA Extension. "I once found out firsthand how much weight some superstitions have at sea," he recalled last week before departing for his home in Vermont.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1992 | Dana Parsons
Maybe it's the enforced rhythm of the game that produces baseball's literature. Maybe there's something about standing around in the outfield or languishing in the bullpen or riding the bench day after day that polishes the storytelling instinct. Whatever the reasons, baseball's library of poetry and prose, of drama and comedy, is as much a part of the game as home runs and strikeouts. Mike Blake appreciates that more than most.
NEWS
May 28, 1990 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The scene at the Sexually Transmitted Disease Clinic, in the heart of Bombay's red-light district, provided painful proof that India is losing the battle with AIDS. It was a Tuesday, and two hours are set aside every Tuesday for prostitutes to come in for blood tests and counseling. Dr. Geeta Bhave and her staff of female doctors from the government's only AIDS surveillance center were chatting in the doctors' meeting room.
NEWS
May 13, 1992 | ROY RIVENBURG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When 11-year-old Beth Huber of Orange finds a rubber band on the sidewalk, she puts it on her wrist and makes five wishes before throwing it back on the ground. Across town, Gary Martinez bounces a toothpaste cap against the sink on the night before exams. If the cap lands on the counter, the 13-year-old considers it a good omen. One of his classmates, Heather Estrada, also 13, holds her breath whenever she passes a graveyard; she regards it as protection against bad luck.
NEWS
December 15, 1990 | JOHN DART, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
From descriptions of the nighttime ritual and objects in the house, it appears that Federico Padres Mexia was not part of an identifiable religious movement, according to people familiar with various spiritual traditions. Rather, he appeared to combine religious practices from Christianity and folk, or neo-pagan, beliefs that might appeal to struggling people seeking to change their luck.
NEWS
November 4, 1989 | JOHN H. LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After 10-month-old Amanda Chiang was found to have acute leukemia, her parents went on a search for a compatible bone marrow donor who might help treat the child. But the Sacramento family ran into a hurdle. There is a greater likelihood of finding a matching donor among their own ethnic group, but some Chinese-Americans believe that they will lose their souls if they participate in a transplant.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2010
UNDERRATED Doves: It was easy to lose track of this excellent Manchester band over the past 10 years, but luckily the new best-of compilation "The Places Between" gives everyone a chance to get reacquainted. It's a bit of a mystery why Doves, still adored in Britain, stayed under the radar in the U.S. while Coldplay and Muse took off, because we'll put Doves' "Catch the Sun" and the magnificently catchy "Black and White Town" up against any rock song of the '00s. The DVR as social filter: In addition to the obvious gains in efficient TV-watching these little wonders allow (seriously, get one ASAP)
SPORTS
February 1, 2010 | By Steve Virgen
After seven seasons without an individual title on the Professional Bowlers Assn. Tour, Mike Fagan resorted to almost anything to get him over the hump. He even depended on some superstition. The 29-year-old with the boyish features and spiky hair sported an unshaven look for his final match at the One A Day Dick Weber Open on Sunday at Fountain Bowl. He didn't ditch the razor to look older, mind you. But maybe appearing mature could help. After all, he was facing Walter Ray Williams Jr., a Hall of Famer and the all-time Lumber Liquidators PBA Tour titles leader with 46. All of a sudden it wasn't about the way Fagan looked.
WORLD
August 7, 2009 | Mark Magnier
Some say it was the prayers, others the all-night vigils, still others the three days without meat or alcohol. Whatever it was that foiled the angry god, residents in this village of about 600 breathed a huge sigh of relief Thursday when the day passed without another death. "We were so scared," said Kuldeep Singh, 32, village head. "Now we feel better." Amloha has been on a knife's edge since late December when the first person died mysteriously.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2007 | Jo Perry, Special to The Times
Have you ever had an unlucky streak when everything went wrong? Then you'll sympathize with Addison Darby, the unluckiest girl at Brookside Elementary School. Sue Wilkowski tells Addison's story in "The Bad Luck Chair." Luckily, the book will be published on July 5, in time to make it your Friday the 13th book club selection. Fourth-grader Addison Darby dislikes being the center of attention.
WORLD
March 22, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
A hundred residents of a Russian village have refused to switch to new passports because they believe the documents' bar codes contain satanic symbols, state TV reported. "We believe these new passports are sinful.... People say they contain three sixes," said Valentina Yepifanova, an elderly resident of Bogolyubovo.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2006 | Martin Miller, Times Staff Writer
Few spots in sports are as lonely as the batter's box. Even for an all-star such as Dodgers first baseman Nomar Garciaparra. So to elevate his comfort level, he approaches the 4-foot-by-6-foot patch of dirt with one of the oddest sets of pre-batting behaviors the national pastime has ever seen. A Garciaparra snapshot looks like this: Adjust red arm band on right arm. Tap home plate with bat. Then, quickly touch helmet bill, end of bat, then back to helmet bill.
HEALTH
October 25, 2010 | By Karen Ravn, Special to the Los Angeles Times
How would you like to see an honest-to-goodness witch flying by your place at midnight this Halloween? Just put your clothes on inside out, start walking around backward, and it'll happen. At least that's how the superstition goes. If you believe in that sort of thing. And there's a good chance that you do. Polls consistently show that about half of all Americans hold some superstitious beliefs (although not necessarily the fly-by one). Superstitions are claims of a particular type ?
NEWS
May 20, 1987 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
Oyeyinka Adegoke, the elderly tribal chief for this steamy little village, has fathered three sets of twins in his 70 years, a feat not much rarer in these parts than an afternoon rain shower. "There are many, many twins here, yes," Adegoke said one afternoon not long ago, as heavy clouds rolled in. "But as a Yoruba man, I know there are twins everywhere." The 18 million Yoruba people of western Nigeria, in fact, have the highest rate of producing twins in the world.
SPORTS
June 1, 2006 | Sam Farmer, Times Staff Writer
The first thing Christian Fauria did after signing a free-agent contract with the Washington Redskins in March was make a phone call. It wasn't to his wife, his parents, or even his agent. It was to his new team's equipment manager. "I said, 'Dude, hold that number!' " said Fauria, who wanted to keep the No. 88 he had worn as a tight end for the New England Patriots. "I had to make sure he kept it." For Fauria, and countless other athletes, the first stop on the road to success is jersey city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2005 | David Pierson, Times Staff Writer
From reserving a banquet room at a highly coveted Chinese restaurant to ordering the three-layer wedding cake with pink icing, Daniel Ha made sure everything was perfect on his wedding day. But perhaps the most important detail was planned in consideration of his tradition-minded Chinese parents: He got married before the upcoming Chinese New Year.
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