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Superstitions

NEWS
September 17, 2000 | NEELESH MISRA, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Waving swords in the dark, 10 frenzied men battered at the frail wooden door of Manikui Goipai's mud and thatch house while she trembled on her bed and her family tried to keep the attackers out. "Kill the witch!" they screamed. Hours earlier, a villager had died of tuberculosis. But in a land where people grow up on superstition, rumors quickly spread that a woman had caused the death through witchcraft. The village ojha, or exorcist, declared it was Goipai.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 2000 | JENIFER RAGLAND, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For 12-year-old Elizabeth Best, it's eating a sugary wad of cotton candy. For 14-year-old Allison Kanny, it's slurping an ice-cold cherry slush. And for 13-year-old Alysia Sanchez, it's making sure her mom stays home. Call it superstition, but for members of Mesa Union School's Academic Rodeo team, these quirky pre-competition rituals Saturday spelled W-I-N.
NEWS
January 9, 2000 | Reuters
A terrified Belgian tourist has asked that a stone he took home from an ancient Scottish burial site be returned to its rightful place, saying the souvenir had been haunting him. Tourism officials in Scotland's northern Highlands region said they received the 2-pound stone in the mail with a letter from the unnamed tourist. The letter said that, since the tourist took the stone home, his daughter had broken her leg, he had lost his job and his wife had fallen ill.
REAL ESTATE
December 19, 1999
Why do you insist on printing fatuous superstitions such as feng shui in what purports to be a news section of your paper? Put this bogus claptrap where it belongs, somewhere between the religion column and the horoscopes. I hate to be the one to tell you, but the quality of one's life has nothing to do with frontdoor placement. ROBERT BARRETT Santa Monica
SPORTS
November 30, 1999 | JIM HODGES
Maybe it's the pacing, which is wearing out a carpet at Staples Center. Maybe it's the "OK, Rob, give the guys a stretch." Maybe it's leaving the locker room the same way, every game. It could be Andy Murray's coaching, unless you're into the occult or looking for some sort of mystic reason for the Kings' success through their first 25 games.
NEWS
September 8, 1999 | BARBARA THOMAS
Are you the superstitious bride or groom type, making sure your marriage mojo is a go-go before you utter "I do"? If you are, we've got nuptial news for you: avoiding ladders, black cats and cracks on sidewalks is wimpy stuff compared with what author Dona Chernoff Eichner has uncovered in her book "Getting Hitched Without a Hitch: How to Plan a Dream Wedding in the Real World," (Andrews McMeel Publishing, 1999, $12.95).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1999
Q: Why is Friday the 13th considered unlucky? A: To understand 13, one has to understand 12. The number 12 has traditionally represented completeness. There are, for example, 12 months in the year, 12 gods of Olympus, 12 signs of the zodiac and 12 disciples of Jesus. Thirteen, then, is traditionally the symbol of the first departure from completeness, and the first step toward evil. Judas Iscariot was the 13th disciple, and the 13th tribe of Israel was the only tribe left without land.
NEWS
July 2, 1999 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yoshio Yasaki, 84, says he's been hospitalized 10 times in his life for various ailments. Each time, he carefully studies his calendar and, when possible, delays his checkout until the next occurrence of taian, a lucky day under Japan's centuries-old lunar calendar. "The best day for checkout is taian," he says. "If you don't follow the calendar, you will regret it." Yasaki evidently isn't alone.
SPORTS
June 5, 1999 | PETER YOON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the day before the big game, Ty Harper said he would approach it like any other game and not a soul on the Corona del Mar High baseball team doubted him. They have seen him all season, eating the same pregame meals, listening to the same music on game day, sitting in the same seat on the bus and placing his equipment bag in the same spot under the Sea King bench.
NEWS
April 5, 1999 | MARTIN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Let's look at the math: David Letterman's top 10 list, a weeknight tradition for well over a decade. Peter Jennings' "The Century," first a book, now a TV miniseries about the last hundred years. Then there's the new millennium, no sponsor yet, but some believe Beelzebub will eventually rule the new era. Even without an official backer, 2000 is still a topic people can't seem to read, write and scream enough about.
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