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NEWS
June 9, 1989 | From Times wire service s
The first raven to be hatched at the Tower of London in more than 300 years made its public debut today, allowing superstitious Britons to relax at last. Legend has it that if the ravens leave the fortified tower, the British kingdom will be destroyed. "Now we have the knack of breeding them here," said John Wilmington, keeper of the queen's ravens. "Royalty, the fortress and England are safe." Ravens have always lived at the tower, London's historic prison for traitors where the crown jewels are now on display, but superstitious British authorities have been shipping them in as fledglings for the last three centuries.
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HEALTH
October 25, 2010 | By Karen Ravn, Special to the Los Angeles Times
How would you like to see an honest-to-goodness witch flying by your place at midnight this Halloween? Just put your clothes on inside out, start walking around backward, and it'll happen. At least that's how the superstition goes. If you believe in that sort of thing. And there's a good chance that you do. Polls consistently show that about half of all Americans hold some superstitious beliefs (although not necessarily the fly-by one). Superstitions are claims of a particular type ?
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1988
A friend accused Niels Bohr, the late Danish quantum physicist, of being superstitious because he had a horseshoe above his office door. The physicist said he wasn't superstitious, but the horseshoe seemed to work just the same. Are our lives affected by the stars? Can the measurement of a particle affect another particle light years away? The late Carroll Righter, astrologer, said yes to the first question. Physicist Bohr said yes to the second. Who's to say a nation's destiny isn't written in the stars?
NEWS
October 15, 2006 | Patrick T. Reardon, Chicago Tribune
If one seven is lucky, three must be really lucky. That's the thinking behind the bonanza of weddings scheduled throughout the nation for Saturday, July 7, 2007 -- or 07/07/07. "Couples are definitely superstitious," says Kathleen Murray, deputy editor of TheKnot.com, a wedding-planning website. "I think they're looking for a great fun date, and 7-7-7 is very lucky."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 1986
Regarding AIDS Project Los Angeles and the Archdiocese of Los Angeles, it is a terrible shame that the church is more concerned with preserving its superstitious dogma than with saving lives. D. NEIL HOROHO West Hollywood
NEWS
June 11, 1989 | From Reuters
The first raven to be hatched at the Tower of London in more than 300 years made its public debut Friday, allowing superstitious Britons to relax at last. Legend has it that if the ravens leave the fortified tower, the British kingdom will be destroyed. "Now we have the knack of breeding them here," said John Wilmington, keeper of the queen's ravens. "Royalty, the fortress and England are safe." Ravens have always lived at the tower, London's historic prison for traitors where the crown jewels are now on display, but superstitious British authorities have been shipping them in as fledglings for the last three centuries.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2004
Author Dean H. Hamer's contention that human "spirituality" is hard-wired in our genes may be true ["Ability to Believe May Be in the Genes," by Bernadette Murphy, Sept. 24], but it doesn't follow that "spirituality" is good for humanity. Indeed, given our penchant for religious wars and stubborn adherence to all kinds of superstitious nonsense, "spirituality" could just as easily be cited as proof of homo sapiens' evolutionary shortcomings. Bonnie Sloane Los Angeles
TRAVEL
October 27, 2002
I enjoyed Susan Spano's article, "For some, only superstition appeases the travel gods" (Her World, Oct. 13). When friends are going on a long journey or a trip overseas, I give them at least one dollar to carry with instructions to give it to a beggar on the day they return home, because I believe angels watch over a traveler on a mission of charity. My grandmother always gave me a new bill to carry with me when I went on a trip. Marcia Cohn Spiegel Rolling Hills Estates
HOME & GARDEN
June 6, 1992 | PATRICK MOTT
Having Irish blood is a pretty good gig. You can hang just about anything in your life on it--credit it for your successes, blame it for your transgressions. Diluted as mine is, I believe it has given me a certain facility with the language (good), a nasally tenor voice (bad), a taste for Guinness (good), a hair-trigger sentimentality (bad) and an inexplicable devotion to superstition. I'm undecided on that last one.
NEWS
June 30, 2005 | Mark Sachs
Since his notorious 1972 breakthrough film, "Pink Flamingos," director John Waters has exhibited a dogged determination to outrage. Whether it's his casting sensibilities (Waters regulars include Patty Hearst and ex-teen porn queen Traci Lords) or his production experiments (1981's "Polyester" was released in Odorama, complete with scratch-and-sniff cards for the audience), Waters always seems to choose the path not only less traveled but off the map altogether.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2004
Author Dean H. Hamer's contention that human "spirituality" is hard-wired in our genes may be true ["Ability to Believe May Be in the Genes," by Bernadette Murphy, Sept. 24], but it doesn't follow that "spirituality" is good for humanity. Indeed, given our penchant for religious wars and stubborn adherence to all kinds of superstitious nonsense, "spirituality" could just as easily be cited as proof of homo sapiens' evolutionary shortcomings. Bonnie Sloane Los Angeles
WORLD
March 25, 2004 | Richard C. Paddock, Times Staff Writer
Nearly every weekday, rocks sent from around the world arrive here at the headquarters of the Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park. Some are the size of gravel. One weighed in at 75 pounds. But they all have one thing in common: They were taken from a sacred mountain by travelers later weighed down by remorse. Most of these stones are pieces of Uluru, the huge red formation in the middle of the Australian Outback that is widely known as Ayers Rock.
OPINION
February 7, 2003 | Michael Keane, Michael Keane is a lecturer on strategy at USC's Marshall School of Business and the author of "Modern Strategy and Tactics," due this fall from Prentice Hall.
The televised images of the loss of the space shuttle Columbia have, as in the Challenger disaster and the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, become seared into the collective American consciousness. Unlike the other tragedies, however, Columbia's, which comes perhaps only weeks before the U.S. commits its troops to war, has an additional, ominous dimension.
BUSINESS
January 27, 2003 | Tom Petruno
Wall Street to Tampa Bay's Bucs: Thank you, we hope. The so-called Super Bowl Indicator holds that a win by the National Football Conference team, or by an American Conference team that was in the original National Football League before its merger with the American Football League in 1970, foreshadows an up year for the stock market. If an original AFL team wins the Super Bowl, it's supposed to predict a down year for stocks.
TRAVEL
October 27, 2002
I enjoyed Susan Spano's article, "For some, only superstition appeases the travel gods" (Her World, Oct. 13). When friends are going on a long journey or a trip overseas, I give them at least one dollar to carry with instructions to give it to a beggar on the day they return home, because I believe angels watch over a traveler on a mission of charity. My grandmother always gave me a new bill to carry with me when I went on a trip. Marcia Cohn Spiegel Rolling Hills Estates
NEWS
June 12, 2002 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the Lakers lost the two playoff games that super-fan Caleb Osborne had videotaped, superstition set in. All taping stopped at his house. Not only that, he refused to watch a game in any room where it was being recorded. "It would have been bad luck," said the Orange resident, who dons Laker shorts, jersey, warmups and his special good luck hard hat for games.
SPORTS
October 22, 1990 | JOHN NELSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
If all goes according to superstition, Jane du Pont Lunger could have the Horse of the Year by the end of the week. Lunger, owner of the 3-year-old filly Go For Wand, will wear the same shoes with the same mud she wore nearly three months ago, and trainer Billy Badgett will be banished from the owner's box again Saturday.
NEWS
March 20, 1992 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A woman entered a tunnel under construction Thursday. In Japan, a nation where modernity and economic development still haven't wiped out ancient myths, that's news. Indeed, both the Construction Ministry and the Assn. of Women Construction Technicians claimed that, to the best of their knowledge, it was the first time that a woman had ever entered a tunnel under construction--at least a woman technician.
SPORTS
August 17, 2001 | PETE THOMAS
They're sweet, nutritious, and might even help lower blood pressure and reduce the risk of strokes. But bananas are not the perfect food they're made out to be. Ask any fisherman. More than likely, you'll be told that the sleek and slender fruit has one major imperfection: It does not sit well with the fish gods. "You bring bananas and you're going to get a lot of bites, but you're going to lose a lot of fish," says Kenny Llanes, 60, captain of On the Fly on the big island of Hawaii.
SPORTS
April 19, 1997 | MARTIN HENDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mission Viejo's Bill Grace was in line for Friday's Mighty Ducks playoff game against Phoenix. And despite Duck Coach Ron Wilson's request that the home fans wear white as a show of support, Grace wore black. Again. Yes, he knew that Wilson had referred to those who didn't wear white at Wednesday's Game 1 as "slackers." But that didn't bother Grace. He figured he was doing Wilson a favor.
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