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Superstring Theory

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1988 | KATHRYN PHILLIPS, Phillips is a Pasadena-based freelance writer. and
Crisp, white manuscripts are carefully arranged in a row of sharp stacks across the top of his desk. Two shelves of books, their bindings flush with each other, hang on one wall, two small photos on another. All other walls are free of clutter. Physicist John Schwarz's Caltech office epitomizes orderliness.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2012 | By Sara Lippincott, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Stephen Hawking An Unfettered Mind Kitty Ferguson Palgrave Macmillan: 320 pp., $27 Today is Stephen Hawking's 70th birthday. It's an event worth marking, not least for its profound unlikelihood. As many even outside the physics community know, he learned about 50 years ago that he had amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (a.k.a. Lou Gehrig's disease). He was given two years to live. However, at the time he was just coming into his own as a theoretical physicist, and he couldn't be bothered to die. Kitty Ferguson, a graduate of Juilliard and author of this intelligent and readable biography, "Stephen Hawking: An Unfettered Mind," is astonishing in her own right.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2012 | By Sara Lippincott, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Stephen Hawking An Unfettered Mind Kitty Ferguson Palgrave Macmillan: 320 pp., $27 Today is Stephen Hawking's 70th birthday. It's an event worth marking, not least for its profound unlikelihood. As many even outside the physics community know, he learned about 50 years ago that he had amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (a.k.a. Lou Gehrig's disease). He was given two years to live. However, at the time he was just coming into his own as a theoretical physicist, and he couldn't be bothered to die. Kitty Ferguson, a graduate of Juilliard and author of this intelligent and readable biography, "Stephen Hawking: An Unfettered Mind," is astonishing in her own right.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1988 | KATHRYN PHILLIPS, Phillips is a Pasadena-based freelance writer. and
Crisp, white manuscripts are carefully arranged in a row of sharp stacks across the top of his desk. Two shelves of books, their bindings flush with each other, hang on one wall, two small photos on another. All other walls are free of clutter. Physicist John Schwarz's Caltech office epitomizes orderliness.
OPINION
July 10, 1988
Is it just our imagination, or are we hearing more rumbles of dissatisfaction from physicists over superstring theory, which has been touted as the much-sought Theory of Everything? This theory has been all the rage among theoretical physicists for several years now, though it is untestable in principle and bizarre to describe. Its strength, its proponents say, is its beautiful mathematics, which unifies diverse phenomena. The key question is whether it is anything more than that.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 1986 | DELTHIA RICKS, United Press International
Not long after Albert Einstein published his theory of relativity 71 years ago, physicists began searching for something they call TOE--or Theory of Everything. Now they think they are on the brink of that discovery with a theory called superstrings. The concept seeks to illustrate the interrelationship among the four basic forces of nature--gravity, electromagnetism and the quantum strong and weak forces. These forces are responsible for all things in nature.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 1996 | ROBERT KOEHLER
The next time you hear an account demonizing science and scientists, remember physicist Jim Gates or Nobel Prize winner Mario Molina or Disney engineer Victoria Aguilera. You'll be able to remember them if you watch the new Blackside-produced series for PBS, "Breakthrough: The Changing Face of Science in America," which shows the human side of science as well as anything on television.
NEWS
November 20, 1987 | LEE DEMBART
Search for a Supertheory: From Atoms to Superstrings by Barry Parker (Plenum: $21.95; 292 pages, illustrated). What is the world made of? is a question that people have wondered about since the ancient Greeks. But only in this century has science zeroed in on the right answer, which turns out to be extraordinarily elusive. Theoretical physics is not easy. In fact, it's very hard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1987
This year marks the 300th anniversary of the publication of Isaac Newton's "Principia Mathematica," one of the great milestones of science and of all thought. In this book (which, like too many other great books, is hardly read anymore) Newton established the idea that the same law of nature that governed falling bodies on Earth also governed the motion of planets and comets in the universe. The idea that nature obeys the same laws everywhere is one of the basic tenets of science.
NEWS
April 3, 1990 | LEE DEMBART
"Big book, big bore," the Greek Callimachus said. "Dialogo" is a little book--a tiny book, hardly a book at all--and it is anything but boring. In 68 pages--with wide margins, no less--Primo Levi, who was a chemist as well as a writer, and Tullio Regge, a physicist, conduct an acrobatic conversation that leaps from Robert Oppenheimer to Kurt Godel to Jorge Luis Borges to studying Hebrew to super-string theory to interstellar travel and then some.
NEWS
November 14, 1989 | LEE DEMBART
An Old Man's Toy: Gravity at Work and Play in Einstein's Universe by A. Zee (Macmillan: $21.95; 272 pages) Physics began in 1687 with the publication of Isaac Newton's "Principia Mathematica," which showed that the law of gravity governs falling apples, the moon and the planets. One law of physics rules everything in the heavens and on Earth. It was one of the greatest intellectual achievements of all time. But in this century, Einstein showed that Newton didn't have it quite right.
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