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Supervisor Harriett M Wieder

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1988
The citizens of Dana Point owe Supervisor Harriett M. Wieder a debt of gratitude for making it possible for the future city of Dana Point to control development of the Dana Point Headlands. When Wieder cast her "no" vote to the developer's agreement between the Sherman Corp. and Orange County, it in essence made it possible for our future city to control the development of an extremely environmentally sensitive area that offers spectacular ocean-coastline vistas. As a citizen of Dana Point, I say thank you Harriett Wieder.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 1994 | KEVIN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two Orange County businesswomen, both political novices, announced their candidacies Wednesday for separate seats on the Board of Supervisors. * Madelene Arakelian, 60, co-owner of South Coast Refuse Corp., will challenge state Sen. Marian Bergeson (R-Newport Beach) for the South County district post being vacated by retiring Supervisor Thomas F. Riley. Haydee Tillotson, 55, owner of a Huntington Beach-based property management company, enters a race to replace Supervisor Harriett M.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1990
I must react to your article last Sunday that implied that Supervisor Harriett M. Wieder has been neglectful of her duties. During the nine years I served on the Huntington Beach City Council and the past two years off the council, I have been able to observe Wieder and work with her on many city issues, including flood control, hazardous waste, the Bolsa Chica wetlands, offshore oil and mobile home protection. At all times, she has been available and conscientious, ready to work with council representatives and concerned citizen groups.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 1992
Supervisor Harriett M. Wieder has finally come out of the closet and shown her true colors. On Aug. 21, Wieder joined other "Republicans," by publicly endorsing Gov. Bill Clinton over President Bush. With this one stroke, she has guaranteed retirement from the Board of Supervisors in 1994. For someone claiming to be a "Republican," Wieder seems compelled to make headlines, by fueling the national media with yet another story about Clinton's supposed strength in conservative Orange County.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1991 | LYNDA NATALI
In an effort to relieve the county's already overcrowded jails, the Board of Supervisors has agreed to pursue state legislation that would establish a sober station for drunks instead of putting them behind bars. At the request of Supervisor Harriett M. Wieder, the board supported the idea of setting up a Sobering Up Station Pilot Program for the county. Only people arrested for public intoxication would qualify.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1987
Turning to their own backyard in an attempt to ease traffic problems, the Board of Supervisors on Tuesday told county agencies and departments to come up with plans to stagger work hours for their 12,000 employees. Supervisor Harriett M. Wieder said 68% of the county's workers now commute to work Monday through Friday during the 7-to-8 a.m. rush hour.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 1986 | John Needham
Supervisor Harriett M. Wieder laughed off remarks Friday by Orange County's Sacramento lobbyist about a new state officeholder being "a mere woman" but said later she thought the comment was "inappropriate." Lobbyist Dennis Carpenter told the county's Legislative Planning Committee, which includes the entire Board of Supervisors and the heads of most county departments, of upcoming meetings with Elizabeth Hill, the state legislative analyst.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 1990 | GEBE MARTINEZ
Boosted by recent contributions from development and real estate groups, engineers and a statewide public employee organization, Supervisor Harriett M. Wieder enters the homestretch in her November reelection bid with an 11-to-1 cash advantage over her challenger. Wieder's latest campaign finance statement, received Friday by the county registrar of voters, showed that she has raised $290,149 this year and spent $311,572. Wieder's opponent, Westminster Councilwoman Joy L.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 1990 | GREG HERNANDEZ
Westminster Councilwoman Joy L. Neugebauer will challenge Supervisor Harriett M. Wieder in her expected bid for a fourth term on the Board of Supervisors. Neugebauer, 62, a three-time former mayor, said she will take out nomination papers next week to run for Wieder's District 2 seat. Instead of paying a $752.96 candidate filing fee, Neugebauer is collecting the 3,012 signatures needed to have her name placed on the ballot.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 1992
Supervisor Harriett M. Wieder has finally come out of the closet and shown her true colors. On Aug. 21, Wieder joined other "Republicans," by publicly endorsing Gov. Bill Clinton over President Bush. With this one stroke, she has guaranteed retirement from the Board of Supervisors in 1994. For someone claiming to be a "Republican," Wieder seems compelled to make headlines, by fueling the national media with yet another story about Clinton's supposed strength in conservative Orange County.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1991 | LYNDA NATALI
In an effort to relieve the county's already overcrowded jails, the Board of Supervisors has agreed to pursue state legislation that would establish a sober station for drunks instead of putting them behind bars. At the request of Supervisor Harriett M. Wieder, the board supported the idea of setting up a Sobering Up Station Pilot Program for the county. Only people arrested for public intoxication would qualify.
NEWS
November 3, 1991 | JIM NEWTON and MARK LANDSBAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As county supervisors cleared the way for a decade-long housing boom that changed the face of Orange County, millions of dollars poured into their campaign coffers from development interests, many of which stood to profit from that growth. A new computer-assisted investigation by The Times found that developers and related businesses--architects, contractors, realty agents and the like--have donated 42% of the campaign money collected by supervisors and board candidates during the last 14 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 1990 | GEBE MARTINEZ
Boosted by recent contributions from development and real estate groups, engineers and a statewide public employee organization, Supervisor Harriett M. Wieder enters the homestretch in her November reelection bid with an 11-to-1 cash advantage over her challenger. Wieder's latest campaign finance statement, received Friday by the county registrar of voters, showed that she has raised $290,149 this year and spent $311,572. Wieder's opponent, Westminster Councilwoman Joy L.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1990
I must react to your article last Sunday that implied that Supervisor Harriett M. Wieder has been neglectful of her duties. During the nine years I served on the Huntington Beach City Council and the past two years off the council, I have been able to observe Wieder and work with her on many city issues, including flood control, hazardous waste, the Bolsa Chica wetlands, offshore oil and mobile home protection. At all times, she has been available and conscientious, ready to work with council representatives and concerned citizen groups.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 1990 | GREG HERNANDEZ
Westminster Councilwoman Joy L. Neugebauer will challenge Supervisor Harriett M. Wieder in her expected bid for a fourth term on the Board of Supervisors. Neugebauer, 62, a three-time former mayor, said she will take out nomination papers next week to run for Wieder's District 2 seat. Instead of paying a $752.96 candidate filing fee, Neugebauer is collecting the 3,012 signatures needed to have her name placed on the ballot.
NEWS
June 14, 1989 | DAVE LESHER, Times Staff Writer
In a 3-2 vote before a tense and emotional crowd, the Orange County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday rejected a proposed ordinance that would ban discrimination against AIDS victims, making Orange County the only urban area in California without such a measure. The vote capped an 18-month study by the county's HIV Advisory Committee that concluded the ordinance was necessary to reduce the spread of acquired immune deficiency syndrome by making its victims more likely to seek treatment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 1987 | JOHN NEEDHAM, Times County Bureau Chief
As the Orange County Board of Supervisors voted Tuesday to make it illegal to brandish fake guns, Supervisor Harriett M. Wieder urged the board to consider a gun control measure that would ban possession of real firearms. With her colleagues on the board listening in stunned silence, Wieder said that the 5-0 vote outlawing threatening displays of replica guns "does open the door on this discussion" and that firearms are "2 times, 10 times, 100 times as dangerous" as replicas.
NEWS
November 3, 1991 | JIM NEWTON and MARK LANDSBAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As county supervisors cleared the way for a decade-long housing boom that changed the face of Orange County, millions of dollars poured into their campaign coffers from development interests, many of which stood to profit from that growth. A new computer-assisted investigation by The Times found that developers and related businesses--architects, contractors, realty agents and the like--have donated 42% of the campaign money collected by supervisors and board candidates during the last 14 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1988 | JEFFREY L. RABIN, Times Staff Writer
Supervisor Harriett M. Wieder on Thursday criticized a volunteer working as her press secretary in the 42nd Congressional District race for impersonating a reporter to get information, but she declined to remove him from her campaign organization. "It was very dumb," Wieder said. "The campaign doesn't need it. I don't need it. . . . It was wrong." But she added: "I can't fire him because he's a volunteer."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1988
The citizens of Dana Point owe Supervisor Harriett M. Wieder a debt of gratitude for making it possible for the future city of Dana Point to control development of the Dana Point Headlands. When Wieder cast her "no" vote to the developer's agreement between the Sherman Corp. and Orange County, it in essence made it possible for our future city to control the development of an extremely environmentally sensitive area that offers spectacular ocean-coastline vistas. As a citizen of Dana Point, I say thank you Harriett Wieder.
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