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NEWS
October 8, 1994 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House ended an intensely fought battle between the dietary supplement industry and its critics Friday by approving a measure that guarantees consumers' continued access to the products but also preserves the government's right to regulate claims used to sell them.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
August 25, 2012 | By Matea Gold and Melanie Mason
Washington Bureau WASHINGTON - Eight months into Mitt Romney's tenure running the Salt Lake City Olympics, he had some good news for the cash-strapped organizing committee, which still was short $179 million. Nu Skin Enterprises, a Utah-based distributor of nutritional supplements and beauty products, would sponsor the 2002 Olympic Winter Games and the U.S. Olympic Team in a deal worth $20 million. Romney, who announced the arrangement along with company executives, touted the partnership as the perfect fit. Both Nu Skin and the Olympics were "about taking control of your life and managing your own destiny," he told 10,000 Nu Skin distributors Oct. 15, 1999, the Deseret News reported.
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NATIONAL
August 25, 2012 | By Matea Gold and Melanie Mason
Washington Bureau WASHINGTON - Eight months into Mitt Romney's tenure running the Salt Lake City Olympics, he had some good news for the cash-strapped organizing committee, which still was short $179 million. Nu Skin Enterprises, a Utah-based distributor of nutritional supplements and beauty products, would sponsor the 2002 Olympic Winter Games and the U.S. Olympic Team in a deal worth $20 million. Romney, who announced the arrangement along with company executives, touted the partnership as the perfect fit. Both Nu Skin and the Olympics were "about taking control of your life and managing your own destiny," he told 10,000 Nu Skin distributors Oct. 15, 1999, the Deseret News reported.
HEALTH
December 20, 2010 | By Chris Woolston, Special to the Los Angeles Times
We all know what aging looks like from the outside: wrinkled skin, gray hair, a growing need to turn up the volume on "Jeopardy. " But in recent years, scientists have made some breakthrough discoveries about how we age on the inside, right down to our genes. The science of aging has created a glimmer of hope that we could someday slow the process ? a dream that has already spread beyond the lab to the marketplace. Anti-aging research used to be mainly about finding new ways to get lab mice to take their vitamins.
HEALTH
December 20, 2010 | By Chris Woolston, Special to the Los Angeles Times
We all know what aging looks like from the outside: wrinkled skin, gray hair, a growing need to turn up the volume on "Jeopardy. " But in recent years, scientists have made some breakthrough discoveries about how we age on the inside, right down to our genes. The science of aging has created a glimmer of hope that we could someday slow the process ? a dream that has already spread beyond the lab to the marketplace. Anti-aging research used to be mainly about finding new ways to get lab mice to take their vitamins.
MAGAZINE
February 22, 2004
I found Matthew Heller's article on St. George, Utah, the supplement industry and the FDA fascinating ("Healthy, Wealthy, But Wise?" Feb. 1). But it left me wondering: Wouldn't it be preferable to educate consumers to act in their own best interests and then trust them to do so? Carol Nahin Palm Desert
OPINION
November 2, 2003
"FDA Draws Fire Over Dietary Aids" (Oct. 29) should have read "Sen. Orrin Hatch Draws Fire.... " The Utah senator is guilty of the same hypocrisy that seems to permeate his party these days. This longtime supplement champion has kept Food and Drug Administration regulators at bay for years while he and his son, a lobbyist for the industry, have both benefited from his cozy relationship with this ephedra-producing industry. After joyfully pocketing the campaign contributions of these supplement manufacturers based in Utah -- the "Silicon Valley" of the supplement industry, for years -- Hatch now says he finds it inexcusable that "a small number of irresponsible supplement companies are taking advantage of consumers."
HEALTH
December 18, 2006 | From Times wire reports
The $22-billion-a-year U.S. dietary supplement industry will be required to report consumer side effects from its products under a bill that Congress passed and President Bush is expected to sign. Supplement manufacturers, including Herbalife Ltd., United Natural Foods Inc., Nature's Sunshine Products Inc. and Usana Health Sciences Inc., will have 15 business days to report adverse events, including death and hospitalization, to the Food and Drug Administration.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 1993
In response to "Truth in Labeling Goes for Vitamins, Too," editorial, Nov. 15: It was not the tiny "supplement industry" that forced a (temporary) delay to the FDA's tender ministrations. It was the enormous number of vitamin users who take responsibility for their own well-being. The truly huge drug industry and "health" industry hate this--cuts down on profits, doesn't it. RAY DORFMAN, Woodland Hills Nobody in the vitamin industry has any problem with labels for vitamins and health supplements.
MAGAZINE
February 1, 2004 | Matthew Heller, Matthew Heller's last article for the magazine was about the proliferation of "spam" e-mails and their effect on Internet marketers.
The federal government banned herbal supplements containing ephedra just four weeks ago, but for America's $16-billion nutritional supplement industry, the good times--those go-go years of unchecked growth and relative freedom from regulation--may have ended much sooner. On Oct. 30, 2001, armed U.S. marshals traveling in a convoy drove to an industrial park on the outskirts of the sleepy, southwestern Utah community of St. George.
NATIONAL
December 16, 2010 | By Andrew Zajac, Washington Bureau
The Food and Drug Administration warned the nation's dietary supplements industry Wednesday against spiking its products with steroids, prescription drugs and other prohibited substances. The warning was the latest salvo in a long-running battle between federal regulators and an industry that is held to far less rigorous health and safety standards than those imposed on makers of pharmaceuticals and medical devices ? thanks in part to powerful friends in Congress. Unlike drugs, dietary supplements don't have to be proven safe before being sold, and manufacturers can make general claims about health benefits.
HEALTH
May 25, 2009 | Melissa Healy
The recent recall of a popular weight-loss supplement comes at a time when Americans are more desperate than ever to lose weight. The pharmaceutical industry has come up virtually empty in a multibillion-dollar race to find a safe and effective weight-loss pill, and consumers, to many health experts' chagrin, are often turning to dietary supplements instead. Now proponents and critics of these products have snapped to attention.
HEALTH
December 18, 2006 | From Times wire reports
The $22-billion-a-year U.S. dietary supplement industry will be required to report consumer side effects from its products under a bill that Congress passed and President Bush is expected to sign. Supplement manufacturers, including Herbalife Ltd., United Natural Foods Inc., Nature's Sunshine Products Inc. and Usana Health Sciences Inc., will have 15 business days to report adverse events, including death and hospitalization, to the Food and Drug Administration.
OPINION
August 6, 2005
IN THE INTERVIEW MONDAY in which President Bush made news by defending the teaching of the "intelligent design" theory, he also defended former Texas Ranger (now Baltimore Oriole) Rafael Palmeiro, recently suspended from Major League Baseball for a positive steroid test. "Palmeiro is a friend," said Bush, once the Rangers' managing partner. "He testified in public [that he never took steroids], and I believe him."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 2005 | Robert Salladay and Dan Morain, Times Staff Writers
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger ended his $8-million contract with a muscle magazine publisher last week. But his deep emotional, political and business ties to bodybuilding -- and to the supplement industry that feeds it -- won't be so easily severed. Since becoming governor, Schwarzenegger has remained closely involved with the bodybuilding world and with the supplement companies whose products promise such things as ripped muscles, "thermonuclear" energy and better sex.
BUSINESS
July 18, 2005 | Michael Hiltzik
In 2003, the chief executive of Metabolife International Inc., then the leading purveyor of herbal dietary supplements in the country, complained to me about the "negative media" concerning its top product, ephedra. Ephedra was then heading toward a government ban, largely because of its links to heart attacks and strokes. The CEO, David Brown, insisted ephedra was generally safe. He said his company was the target of an irrational attack.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 1994
Let's keep something straight about the new regulations on vitamins issued by the Food and Drug Administration. The FDA is not saying, "Do not take vitamins." The agency is not saying, "Do not sell vitamins." It is only requiring that vitamin and dietary supplement makers provide us with accurate information. They must, for example, substantiate with scientific evidence any health claims they make in selling their products. That's the same FDA standard that is applied to processed foods.
OPINION
December 31, 2003
The Bush administration's announcement that it plans to ban ephedra came several weeks after lawsuits forced Metabolife, the last major manufacturer of products containing the risky drug, to stop selling ephedra products. It's a classic case of closing the barn door long after the cows have ambled on. Health and Human Services Secretary Tommy G. Thompson said he decided to announce the ban now -- the government's first-ever on a dietary supplement -- so that people making New Year's weight-loss resolutions wouldn't be tempted to try "speed"-like ephedra, long sold as an exercise and weight loss aid. The obvious question is, why did he wait so long?
MAGAZINE
February 22, 2004
I found Matthew Heller's article on St. George, Utah, the supplement industry and the FDA fascinating ("Healthy, Wealthy, But Wise?" Feb. 1). But it left me wondering: Wouldn't it be preferable to educate consumers to act in their own best interests and then trust them to do so? Carol Nahin Palm Desert
MAGAZINE
February 1, 2004 | Matthew Heller, Matthew Heller's last article for the magazine was about the proliferation of "spam" e-mails and their effect on Internet marketers.
The federal government banned herbal supplements containing ephedra just four weeks ago, but for America's $16-billion nutritional supplement industry, the good times--those go-go years of unchecked growth and relative freedom from regulation--may have ended much sooner. On Oct. 30, 2001, armed U.S. marshals traveling in a convoy drove to an industrial park on the outskirts of the sleepy, southwestern Utah community of St. George.
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