Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSupplemental Nutrition Assistance Program
IN THE NEWS

Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
November 15, 2010 | By P.J. Huffstutter, Los Angeles Times
About 15% of U.S. households ? 17.4 million families ? lacked enough money to feed themselves at some point last year, according to a new U.S. Department of Agriculture report. Released Monday, the study also found that 6.8 million of these households ? with as many as 1 million children ? had ongoing financial problems that forced them to miss meals regularly. The number of these "food insecure" homes, or households that had a tough time providing enough food for their members, stayed somewhat steady from 2008 to 2009.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
November 28, 2013
Re "When holiday tables are bare," Column, Nov. 26 While the Thanksgiving holiday is a time of celebration for many families, for the 49 million Americans experiencing food insecurity, these are tough times. The Great Recession forced many families and individuals into food pantry lines. It is seldom reported, but the economy has recovered a little more than 7.2 million of the 8.7 million jobs lost between the start of the recession in December 2007 and early 2010. It's not surprising that 47.6 million Americans have turned to the federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, called CalFresh locally)
Advertisement
OPINION
May 29, 2013
Re "The case for food stamps," Opinion, May 24 The proposed reductions to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (also known as food stamps) are more evidence of the inequality between rich and poor in the United States. There are some 50 million Americans who are "food insecure," including roughly 17 million children, according to the charity Feeding America. The cuts are more than an economic misstep - they are a moral failing. The average food stamp benefit is a little more than $4 a day, about what one pays for a latte at Starbucks.
OPINION
November 3, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
The day after Halloween, the federal government rolled back food stamp benefits for all 47.6 million people who receive them, officially ending one of the last remaining stimulus efforts left over from President Obama's first months in office - while also making it harder for millions of Americans to get enough to eat. The callousness displayed in cutting vital safety net benefits at a time when millions lack the resources to feed their families adequately...
OPINION
August 2, 2013 | By Felice J. Freyer and Irene M. Wielawski
The debate in Congress about cutting the food stamp program has sparked predictable clashes between those who want to help the poor and those who want to cut government spending. But strangely missing from the arguments is a shocking fact: The public, including Congress, knows almost nothing about how the program's $80 billion is spent. What foods are being purchased by the 47 million Americans who rely on the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP (the official name for food stamps)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2010
The U.S. Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP, was established in 1969. California residents received $4.8 billion in food stamp benefits in 2009. WHO QUALIFIES: The program is available to U.S. citizens and many legal residents. Net household income after certain deductions must be at or below the poverty line -- $903 a month for a single adult or $1,838 for a family of four. Most applicants must show that their total household income does not exceed 130% of the federal poverty level -- $1,174 a month for a single adult or $2,389 for a family of four.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2010 | By Alexandra Zavis, Los Angeles Times
California's food stamp program has a new name, which officials hope will encourage more people to apply for the nutrition benefit: CalFresh. The new name and logo ? an abstract representation of the diverse produce available in California ? was launched Saturday at an event in Long Beach sponsored by first lady Maria Shriver to provide free medical, financial and educational services to low-income women. "This rebranding campaign will go a long way in helping to erase the unfortunate stigma associated with this program and encourage families to seek CalFresh as a resource for putting healthy meals on their table," Shriver said in a statement.
NATIONAL
January 12, 2010 | Mcclatchy Newspapers
The United States has more poor children now than it did a year ago. As more families are hammered by the recession, more are using food stamps to feed their kids, according to a study by the Brookings Institution and First Focus, a bipartisan child advocacy group. "They are a really good barometer, a kind of economic-needs test," said Mark R. Rank, an expert on social welfare programs at Washington University in St. Louis. "If you're receiving food stamps and you're a child, by definition, you're in poverty."
OPINION
November 28, 2013
Re "When holiday tables are bare," Column, Nov. 26 While the Thanksgiving holiday is a time of celebration for many families, for the 49 million Americans experiencing food insecurity, these are tough times. The Great Recession forced many families and individuals into food pantry lines. It is seldom reported, but the economy has recovered a little more than 7.2 million of the 8.7 million jobs lost between the start of the recession in December 2007 and early 2010. It's not surprising that 47.6 million Americans have turned to the federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, called CalFresh locally)
BUSINESS
September 17, 2013 | By Shan Li
Panera Bread Chief Executive Ron Shaich can afford to eat just about anywhere. But for one week the millionaire is shelling out no more than $4.50 a day as part of an effort to see how people on food stamps live. Called the SNAP challenge, the experiment involves buying food using only what a family would receive on the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, formerly known as the Food Stamp program. Shaich, who is blogging about the experience on the career site LinkedIn, is taking up the cause just as the House of Representatives is set to take up a proposal that could cut SNAP funding by $40 billion over the next decade.
BUSINESS
November 1, 2013 | By Walter Hamilton and Tiffany Hsu
U.S. food retailers are poised to take a hit as the federal government reduces its $78 billion-a-year food stamp program. Grocery stores and other food retailers have struggled in recent years as consumers battered by high unemployment and shrinking wages switched from upscale products to discounted bulk goods and generic brands. Food sales, especially at discounters such as Wal-Mart Stores Inc., could be further crimped by the $5-billion, or roughly 6%, annual cut in food stamps that took effect Friday.
BUSINESS
September 17, 2013 | By Shan Li
Panera Bread Chief Executive Ron Shaich can afford to eat just about anywhere. But for one week the millionaire is shelling out no more than $4.50 a day as part of an effort to see how people on food stamps live. Called the SNAP challenge, the experiment involves buying food using only what a family would receive on the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, formerly known as the Food Stamp program. Shaich, who is blogging about the experience on the career site LinkedIn, is taking up the cause just as the House of Representatives is set to take up a proposal that could cut SNAP funding by $40 billion over the next decade.
OPINION
August 2, 2013 | By Felice J. Freyer and Irene M. Wielawski
The debate in Congress about cutting the food stamp program has sparked predictable clashes between those who want to help the poor and those who want to cut government spending. But strangely missing from the arguments is a shocking fact: The public, including Congress, knows almost nothing about how the program's $80 billion is spent. What foods are being purchased by the 47 million Americans who rely on the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP (the official name for food stamps)
BUSINESS
July 24, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
Congressman George Miller (D-Martinez), has called out his colleagues in the House of Representatives who voted two weeks ago to zero out funding for food stamps while collecting millions of dollars in farm subsidies for themselves with both hands.  There are 14 of them, all Republicans, according to the report Miller's office issued this week . Titled "Pork Barrel Politics," it names names. This rogues' gallery of hypocrisy has a total net worth of up to $124.5 million (the exact figure isn't public, because members of Congress only have to declare their wealth in ranges)
OPINION
June 20, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
"The one who is unwilling to work shall not eat," Rep. Stephen Fincher (R-Tenn.) said in quoting the Bible last month of the 48 million hungry Americans, mostly working families and senior citizens, who require federal help to put food on the table. That misguided principle stands at the center of a House farm bill that threatens $20.5 billion in cuts over a decade to food stamps, officially known as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. Pursuing the sacred cause of deficit reduction, Congress would sooner shrink aid to struggling families than substantially reform farm subsidies, of which Fincher, who owns a family cotton farm, is one of the largest recipients in Tennessee history.
NEWS
June 20, 2013 | By Jon Healey
Supporters of the federal food stamp program exulted Thursday when the House defeated a major agriculture bill that would have trimmed its budget by a few percent. But if they think the House rejected the bill because of the food stamp cuts, they can't count votes. The bill, HR 1947, would have reauthorized the full range of farm programs for five years at an estimated cost of almost $1 trillion. About three-quarters of the funds would have gone to food stamps, a.k.a. the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program.
OPINION
November 3, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
The day after Halloween, the federal government rolled back food stamp benefits for all 47.6 million people who receive them, officially ending one of the last remaining stimulus efforts left over from President Obama's first months in office - while also making it harder for millions of Americans to get enough to eat. The callousness displayed in cutting vital safety net benefits at a time when millions lack the resources to feed their families adequately...
NEWS
December 1, 2012 | By James Rainey
Negotiators in Washington like to say “everything is on the table” as they struggle to meet a year-end budget deadline. But the irony is that while looking for the big-ticket solution to avoid the automatic cuts and tax increases of the “fiscal cliff,” official Washington has been too preoccupied to move ahead on another bill that would save $23 billion to $35 billion. The five-year farm bill is not a done deal, but legislators from agricultural states have said in recent days they could get it passed if Congress and President Obama expanded their thinking about how to avoid the year-end cliff.
NEWS
June 18, 2013 | By Jon Healey
I realize that members of Congress have to suspend their sense of irony just to get through the day, but I'm still having trouble understanding how the House could consider cutting food stamps in the name of personal responsibility while creating new subsidy programs to preserve farmers' incomes near their historic highs. Food stamps and farm subsidies are joined at the hip in part because the former (a.k.a. the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program ) is overseen by the federal Department of Agriculture, which also administers the panoply of farm supports.
OPINION
May 29, 2013
Re "The case for food stamps," Opinion, May 24 The proposed reductions to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (also known as food stamps) are more evidence of the inequality between rich and poor in the United States. There are some 50 million Americans who are "food insecure," including roughly 17 million children, according to the charity Feeding America. The cuts are more than an economic misstep - they are a moral failing. The average food stamp benefit is a little more than $4 a day, about what one pays for a latte at Starbucks.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|