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Supplemental Security Income

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1993 | DEBRA CANO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Addie D'Agui and Michael Bergeron are like any other couple who fall in love and want to marry. But if this couple said "I do," their combined income would drop substantially. D'Agui and Bergeron are disabled and living on Supplemental Security Income payments. If they married, they would lose about $90 a month, a result of a government policy that provides married couples with less assistance than two single individuals.
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NATIONAL
October 16, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
Seniors will get a 1.7% increase in their monthly Social Security payments in 2013, one of the smallest cost-of-living adjustments since the automatic annual increase in benefits took effect in 1975. The Social Security Administration on Tuesday announced the 1.7% COLA, which is based on the rate of inflation. It is the sixth time since 1975 that the adjustment has been less than 2%. This year, retirees received a 3.6% increase after receiving no increase the previous two years.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1997 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Forgive George Poon if he remained unconvinced Thursday, a day after Congress moved to restore benefit eligibility to 86,000 disabled and elderly legal immigrants living in L.A. County and more than 400,000 noncitizens elsewhere. "They could still pull a fast one on us," said Poon, director of the Chinatown Senior Citizen Service Center, where government assistance checks have long been a mainstay for elderly clients.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 2010 | By Alexandra Zavis, Los Angeles Times
Leaning on a cane, Donjean Gardner eases open her fridge and surveys the contents: half a Subway sandwich, several boxes of tangerine juice, a jar of pickles and half a jar of salsa. Her one good meal a day comes from Meals on Wheels. Diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in her 30s, Gardner traveled the world for 20 more years working in television production. But the disease caught up with her eventually. Now 70, she is mostly confined to the metal bed that dominates her cramped apartment in Echo Park.
NEWS
July 26, 1993 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Advocates for the elderly say that up to 25,000 impoverished senior citizens could be evicted from board-and-care facilities statewide under regulations proposed this month by officials at the California Department of Social Services. The regulations would effectively abolish restrictions on the fees that private residential care facilities can charge elderly recipients of Supplemental Security Income. Under current regulations, such facilities can charge SSI recipients only $650 per month.
NEWS
September 24, 1998 | From Associated Press
About 18,000 mostly poor, elderly immigrants would keep their supplemental security income benefits under legislation the House passed Wednesday. Under the welfare reform law of 1996, noncitizens were cut from the SSI rolls. Congress later extended the benefits through Sept. 30, 1998. The bill, passed by voice vote, would permanently extend the help.
NEWS
July 23, 1986
The House voted unanimously to make the Social Security Administration an independent agency and prohibit the Treasury Department from using the agency's investments to finance the federal debt. The new agency would have a three-member, bipartisan governing board and would be responsible for the old-age, survivors and disability programs and for Supplemental Security Income.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 2010 | By Alexandra Zavis, Los Angeles Times
Leaning on a cane, Donjean Gardner eases open her fridge and surveys the contents: half a Subway sandwich, several boxes of tangerine juice, a jar of pickles and half a jar of salsa. Her one good meal a day comes from Meals on Wheels. Diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in her 30s, Gardner traveled the world for 20 more years working in television production. But the disease caught up with her eventually. Now 70, she is mostly confined to the metal bed that dominates her cramped apartment in Echo Park.
OPINION
May 4, 2004
If Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger is truly interested in addressing and ending waste and fraud in government, he would do well to work toward ending the abuse that was written about in "Public Pays for Wealthy Seniors' Care" (May 2). Instead of finding more ways to make the disabled, poor and blind pay for the state budgetary problems, instead of cutting wages to in-home support services workers, instead of terminating the federal cost-of-living adjustment on SSI [Supplemental Security Income]
NEWS
October 16, 1987 | Associated Press
A new Reagan Administration policy that will mean lower welfare benefits for many elderly, blind and disabled people who get free food, shelter, firewood or winter clothing from churches and other charitable organizations drew outrage today from advocates for the poor and homeless. Under the new policy, non-cash help must be counted as income, the New York Times reported today. "For every bag of groceries we give these poor people, the government will reduce their benefit checks," said Sharon M.
OPINION
May 4, 2004
If Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger is truly interested in addressing and ending waste and fraud in government, he would do well to work toward ending the abuse that was written about in "Public Pays for Wealthy Seniors' Care" (May 2). Instead of finding more ways to make the disabled, poor and blind pay for the state budgetary problems, instead of cutting wages to in-home support services workers, instead of terminating the federal cost-of-living adjustment on SSI [Supplemental Security Income]
NEWS
September 24, 1998 | From Associated Press
About 18,000 mostly poor, elderly immigrants would keep their supplemental security income benefits under legislation the House passed Wednesday. Under the welfare reform law of 1996, noncitizens were cut from the SSI rolls. Congress later extended the benefits through Sept. 30, 1998. The bill, passed by voice vote, would permanently extend the help.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1998 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 4,000 elderly or disabled immigrants living in Los Angeles County stand to lose federal aid Sept. 30 unless they can show they have obtained U.S. citizenship or permanent resident status, officials said Friday. The residents receive Supplemental Security Income, a federal cash assistance program for elderly, blind and disabled legal residents. Benefits range up to $640 a month from federal and state governments.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1997 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Forgive George Poon if he remained unconvinced Thursday, a day after Congress moved to restore benefit eligibility to 86,000 disabled and elderly legal immigrants living in L.A. County and more than 400,000 noncitizens elsewhere. "They could still pull a fast one on us," said Poon, director of the Chinatown Senior Citizen Service Center, where government assistance checks have long been a mainstay for elderly clients.
NEWS
May 4, 1997 | JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The new federal budget agreement gives President Clinton much of what he wanted when he promised to fix some of the most glaring problems he saw in the welfare reform measure he signed into law last year. The bargain struck Friday between the White House and Republican leaders in Congress does not change core features of the welfare law, including its work requirements and time limits on benefits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1997
When President Clinton signed the welfare reform bill last August, he did so knowing he was putting at risk about 500,000 elderly and disabled legal immigrants and he vowed to ease the new law's harshest aspects after the presidential election. Now, however, many of these people are being notified that their aid may be cut by Aug. 1, and they rightly are fearful. Congress should help stem their panic by delaying the implementation of the welfare reform law until the problem is resolved.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1997
When President Clinton signed the welfare reform bill last August, he did so knowing he was putting at risk about 500,000 elderly and disabled legal immigrants and he vowed to ease the new law's harshest aspects after the presidential election. Now, however, many of these people are being notified that their aid may be cut by Aug. 1, and they rightly are fearful. Congress should help stem their panic by delaying the implementation of the welfare reform law until the problem is resolved.
OPINION
December 23, 1990
I have just received a letter from the Social Security Administration in Baltimore, Md., telling me that I will get a $23 decrease in Supplemental Security Income. Not only will I not receive a $23 increase, but coupled with the decrease, it will cost me $552 a year. How many thousands of people in California are in the same shape? With the state being broke, do you think it will be enough to pay for the raises they just passed for the politicians. Think about it when you hear about someone being laid off in your department or your company.
NEWS
April 6, 1997 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Everything about Mary Cross' future is steeped in uncertainty. Can she maintain the precarious existence she has eked out on public assistance? Will she be able to keep the three young sons whom she adores--despite increasing signs that authorities think they might be better off elsewhere? How long will she survive as she battles the scourge of AIDS?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1997 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The federal government unveiled long-awaited guidelines Tuesday that could allow tens of thousands of physically and mentally disabled immigrants, many of them in Los Angeles, to become U.S. citizens without passing English and U.S. civics tests. The new rules, more than two years in the making, come as 500,000 elderly and disabled noncitizens nationwide--40% of them in California--face a cutoff this summer of federal Supplemental Security Income benefits.
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